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Modelling the C-13 and C-12 isotopes of inorganic and organic carbon in the Baltic Sea
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
Number of Authors: 4
2015 (English)In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 148, 122-130 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, C-12 and C-13 contents of all carbon containing state variables (dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, detrital carbon, and the carbon content of autotrophs and heterotrophs) have for the first time been explicitly included in a coupled physical-biogeochemical Baltic Sea model. Different processes in the carbon cycling have distinct fractionation values, resulting in specific isotopic fingerprints. Thus, in addition to simulating concentrations of different tracers, our new model formulation improves the possibility to constrain the rates of processes such as CO2 assimilation, mineralization, and air-sea exchange. We demonstrate that phytoplankton production and respiration, and the related air-sea CO2 fluxes, are to a large degree controlling the isotopic composition of organic and inorganic carbon in the system. The isotopic composition is further, but to a lesser extent, influenced by river loads and deep water inflows as well as transformation of terrestrial organic carbon within the system. Changes in the isotopic composition over the 20th century have been dominated by two processes the preferential release of C-12 to the atmosphere in association with fossil fuel burning, and the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea related to increased nutrient loads under the second half of the century.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 148, 122-130 p.
Keyword [en]
Baltic Sea, Modelling, Carbon isotopes
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-119117DOI: 10.1016/j.jmarsys.2015.02.008ISI: 000356546400011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-119117DiVA: diva2:843832
Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-29 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Gustafsson, ErikMörth, Carl-MagnusHumborg, ChristophGustafsson, Bo G.
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Baltic Nest InstituteDepartment of Geological SciencesDepartment of Applied Environmental Science (ITM)
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Journal of Marine Systems
Earth and Related Environmental SciencesBiological Sciences

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