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The Environmental Pollutants Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid Upregulate Uncoupling Protein 1 (UCP1) in Brown-Fat Mitochondria Through a UCP1-Dependent Reduction in Food Intake
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
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Number of Authors: 11
2015 (English)In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 146, no 2, 334-343 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The environmental pollutants perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) cause a dramatic reduction in the size of the major adipose tissue depots and a general body weight decrease when they are added to the food of mice. We demonstrate here that this is mainly due to a reduction in food intake; this reduction was not due to food aversion. Remarkably and unexpectedly, a large part of the effect of PFOA/PFOS on food intake was dependent on the presence of the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in the mice. Correspondingly, PFOA/PFOS treatment induced recruitment of brown adipose tissue mitochondria: increased oxidative capacity and increased UCP1-mediated oxygen consumption (thermogenesis). In mice pair-fed to the food intake during PFOA/PFOS treatment in wildtype mice, brown-fat mitochondrial recruitment was also induced. We conclude that we have uncovered the existence of a regulatory component of food intake that is dependent upon brown adipose tissue thermogenic activity. The possible environmental consequences of this novel PFOA/PFOS effect (a possible decreased fitness) are noted, as well as the perspectives of this finding on the general understanding of control of food intake control and its possible extension to combatting obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 146, no 2, 334-343 p.
Keyword [en]
thermogenesis, food restriction, adipose tissue, fatty acid oxidation, body temperature
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-120704DOI: 10.1093/toxsci/kfv098ISI: 000359630300013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-120704DiVA: diva2:854939
Available from: 2015-09-18 Created: 2015-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Shabalina, Irina G.Kramarova, Tatiana V.Petrovic, NatasaQazi, Mousumi RahmanCsikasz, Robert I.DePierre, Joseph W.Cannon, BarbaraNedergaard, Jan
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Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren InstituteDepartment of Biochemistry and Biophysics
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