Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Syllable duration in L1 and its impact on the prominence level in L2
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
2015 (English)In: ISMBS 2015: Abstracts, 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The correct production of contrast in prominence in a second language is challengingfor the learners. Not only is there the placement of stress on the appropriate syllable in the word that has to be learned, but also features which are used to express such a contrast have to be acquired, and to what extent they are used. Such features can be based on the variation of sound intensity, segment and/or syllable length, presence of tonal accents and degree of articulatory precision. Furthermore, the level of prominence of several syllables in an utterance is not just twofold, but can be primary, secondary or tertiary.When studying accented L2-speech of Swedish produced by L1-speakers of Albanian, it was not always clear which syllable in a word was carrying the highest level of stress. Therefore, one of the foreign accent features is not simply based on incorrect stress placement, but there is a need for further explanations. Observations from auditory analysis were that vowel quality reduction –as required in unstressed syllables in Swedish in most cases –was not carried out sufficiently. Visual inspection of the speech wave gave the impression that vowels seemed to be of similar length and at almost equal distance from each other, no matter if they were part of an anticipated stressed or unstressed syllable.Based on these observations, the current contribution aims to give an account for similarities or dissimilarities in syllable length between Swedish and Albanian produced by L1-speakers and L2-Swedish produced by Albanian L1-speakers. Hereby, the approach taken includes the measurements of syllable duration of spontaneous and read speech and the calculation of the nPVI. If the observation presented above is correct, the nPVI for Albanian L1-speech would have a lower value –referring to a language which is more similar to a syllable-timed-language –than the nPVI for Swedish L1-speech, similar to what is referred to as stress-timed. The analysis of the nPVI carried out on L2-Swedish speech, produced by L1-speakers of Albanian will then be compared to the indices received from L1-speech. It is assumed, that the nPVI of L2-Swedish is closer in value to the nPVI of L1-Albanian than to the nPVI of L1-speakers’ Swedish. The analysis of read speech is added here to rule out that the above stated observations were merely based on an artefact. Such an artefact could have been caused by the rather unnatural situation of language production when reading -when the subject’s attention is drawn to the text and effort is made to reproduce the text as clearly as possible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
Keyword [en]
foreign accent, L2-prosody, stress systems, prominence levels, nPVI, syllable duration
National Category
Languages and Literature Didactics
Research subject
Phonetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-121741OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-121741DiVA: diva2:861023
Conference
International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech, Chania, Greece, September 7-10, 2015
Available from: 2015-10-15 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2016-11-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Book of abstracts

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Zetterholm, Elisabeth
By organisation
Department of Language Education
Languages and LiteratureDidactics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 48 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf