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Stylistic and Phonological Conditioning of Rhoticity among Chinese (Yunnan) Speakers of English
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
2015 (English)In: Workshop Chinese "Accents and Accented Chinese": Nordic Centre, Fudan University, Shanghai, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, the presence and importance of English has increased significantly in China, which is now regarded as belonging to the ‘Expanding circles’ of English (Kachru, 1982). Although this has triggered scholarly attention tothe status, function, and features of English in China, research on pronunciation remains limited (Bolton & Graddol, 2012). Spoken forms of English are commonly classified as ‘rhotic’ or ‘non-rhotic’, depending on whether or not /r/ is pronounced in non-prevocalic positions (e.g. car, cart). Although it constitute some of the most salient English pronunciation features globally, little is known about the patterning of rhoticity among Chinese speakers of English. Rhoticity is generally affected by such factors as L1(s), teaching models, and exposure; its presence is often also taken as a sign of growing influence of American English. This paper presents a study of the pronunciation of English by speakers from Yunnan Province. In part 1, ten non-English major undergraduate students participated in three speech tasks of different formality levels, enabling investigation of inter-and intra-speaker variation. The degree of rhoticity was assessed based on auditory analysis (inter-rater agreement 97%). The results point to considerable inter-speaker variation; they further reveal systematic intra-speaker variation: increasing formality is associated with an increase in the degree of rhoticity. In part 2, additional data was collected to examine phonological conditioning of rhoticity in greater detail. Factors assessed include transference andvowel quality. Finally, implications of the present findings for norm emergence among Yunnan speakers of English (cf. Ao & Low, 2012) are considered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
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Research subject
General Linguistics; Asian Languages and Cultures; English; Phonetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-122432OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-122432DiVA: diva2:866177
Conference
Chinese Accents and Accented Chinese, Shanghai, China, October 26-27, 2015
Available from: 2015-11-02 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2016-11-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf