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Transfer of knowledge and skills from computer gaming to non-digital real world contexts
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
2015 (English)In: ICEL 2015, Academic Conferences Publishing , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The "N-generation" or the "digital natives" have now entered university programmes and their extensive use of computers and digital games is a fact (Spires 2008). Digital games and gamification are also proliferating in private, professional as well as in educational domains (Reinhardt & Sykes 2014). Phenomena as play, narration and gamification are classified as transmedial, i.e. they exist in digital as well as non-digital contexts (Dymek, 2010), but there is no consensus on learning transfer from digital gaming to real world contexts. While some researchers claim a strong learning potential (Gee, 2003; Reinhardt & Sykes, 2014), others have more sceptical standpoints (Hays 2005; Linderoth 2012). Would the opinions on learning transfer be different if the question is asked to the digital natives themselves? The aim of this paper is to analyse and discuss what students in the digital natives’ generation might have learnt in gaming and if acquired skills and knowledge can be transferred to other contexts. A content analysis has been carried out on student essays submitted and discussed in a course on Games-based learning. Students’ experiences from gaming and learning transfer have also been discussed in course examination seminars. Findings show that the digital natives definitely have strong gaming habits, and a majority of the students perceived that they had learnt meaningful things from gaming. Regarding knowledge and skill transfer, variations were noted among the various types of games. Furthermore, there are several examples from both educational games and commercial-off-the-shelf games where acquired skills and knowledge can be seen as transmedial and of use in non-digital contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Conferences Publishing , 2015.
Keyword [en]
Game-based learning, GBL, Knowledge transfer, Digital games, Learning by gaming
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-119922OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-119922DiVA: diva2:868534
Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2015-11-11

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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