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Evaluating Educational Games Using Facial Expression Recognition Software: Measurement of Gaming Emotion
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
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2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the 9th European conference on game-based learning / [ed] Robin Munkvold, Dr Line Kolås, Reading: Academic Conferences Publishing, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The issue of using educational games versus entertainment games as the base for learning environments is complex, and various data to base the decision on is needed. While participants’ verbal accounts of their situation is important, also other modes of expression would be meaningful as data sources. The availability of valid and reliable methods for evaluating games is central to building ones that are successful, and should preferably include outside measurements that are less affected by the participants’ choice of what to share. The present study considers a method using software for analysing facial expressions during gameplay, testing its ability to reveal inherent differences between educational and entertainment games. Participants (N=11) played two games, an entertainment game and an educational game, while facial expressions were measured continuously. The main finding was significantly higher degrees of expressions associated with negative emotions (anger [p < 0.001], fear [p < 0.001] and disgust [p < 0.001]) while playing the educational game, indicating that participants were more negative towards this game type. The combination of cognitive load inherent in learning and negative emotions found in the educational game may explain why educational games sometimes have been less successful. The results suggest that the method used in the present study might be useful as part of the evaluation of educational games.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Reading: Academic Conferences Publishing, 2015.
Keyword [en]
Facial expressions, emotions, games, educational games, evaluation methods
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-122813ISBN: 978-1-910810-58-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-122813DiVA: diva2:868631
Conference
9th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Nord-Trondelag University College, Steinkjer, Norway, 8-9 October, 2015.
Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2016-02-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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