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Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7366-1868
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Number of Authors: 4
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, no 1812, 116-124 p., 20151132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Large brains are thought to result from selection for cognitive benefits, but how enhanced cognition leads to increased fitness remains poorly understood. One explanation is that increased cognitive ability results in improved monitoring and assessment of predator threats. Here, we use male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata), artificially selected for large and small brain size, to provide an experimental evaluation of this hypothesis. We examined their behavioural response as singletons, pairs or shoals of four towards a model predator. Large-brained females, but not males, spent less time performing predator inspections, an inherently risky behaviour. Video analysis revealed that large-brained females were further away from the model predator when in pairs but that they habituated quickly towards the model when in shoals of four. Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males. We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response. Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion. Our results provide experimental support for the general idea that predation pressure is likely to be important for the evolution of brain size in prey species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 282, no 1812, 116-124 p., 20151132
Keyword [en]
brain size, predator response, predator inspection, artificial selection, guppy, Poecilia reticulata
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ethology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-122775DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1132ISI: 000362305500014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-122775DiVA: diva2:868751
Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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van der Bijl, WouterKotrschal, AlexanderKolm, Niclas
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