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Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Epidemiologi)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Epidemiologi)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Epidemiologi)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, e0140516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51-60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 10, no 10, e0140516
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-123152DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140516ISI: 000363799900007PubMedID: 26501351Local ID: P-3288OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-123152DiVA: diva2:871956
Available from: 2015-11-17 Created: 2015-11-17 Last updated: 2015-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Nyberg, AnnaHanson, Linda L. MagnussonLeineweber, ConstanzeJohansson, Gunn
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Stress Research InstituteDepartment of Psychology
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