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Work–family conflict and self-rated health: the role of gender and educational level. Baseline data from the Brazilian longitudinal study of adult health (ELSA-Brasil)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 3, 372-382 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

This study examined gender differences in the association between work–family conflict and self-rated health and evaluated the effect of educational attainment.

Method

We used baseline data from ELSA-Brasil, a cohort study of civil servants from six Brazilian state capitals. Our samples included 12,017 active workers aged 34–72 years. Work–family conflict was measured by four indicators measuring effects of work on family, effects of family in work and lack of time for leisure and personal care.

Results

Women experienced more frequent work–family conflict, but in both genders, increased work–family conflict directly correlated with poorer self-rated health. Women’s educational level interacted with three work–family conflict indicators. For time-based effects of work on family, highly educated women had higher odds of suboptimal self-rated health (OR = 1.54; 95 % CI = 1.19–1.99) than less educated women (OR = 1.14; 95 % CI = 0.92–1.42). For strain-based effects of work on family, women with higher and lower education levels had OR = 1.91 (95 % CI 1.48–2.47) and OR = 1.40 (95 % CI 1.12–1.75), respectively. For lack of time for leisure and personal care, women with higher and lower education levels had OR = 2.60 (95 % CI = 1.95–3.47) and OR = 1.11 (95 % CI = 0.90–1.38), respectively.

Conclusion

Women’s education level affects the relationship between work–family conflict and self-rated health. The results may contribute to prevention activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 23, no 3, 372-382 p.
Keyword [en]
Gender, Work and family conflict, Self-rated health, Educational level, ELSA-Brasil cohort study
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-123407DOI: 10.1007/s12529-015-9523-xISI: 000376033200015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-123407DiVA: diva2:873829
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2016-07-19Bibliographically approved

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Härter Griep, RosaneToivanen, Susanna
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