Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Impacts of high-latitude volcanic eruptions on ENSO and AMOC
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology . National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service Center for Satellite Application and Research, USA; University of Maryland, USA.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Number of Authors: 4
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 45, 13784-13788 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Large volcanic eruptions can have major impacts on global climate, affecting both atmospheric and ocean circulation through changes in atmospheric chemical composition and optical properties. The residence time of volcanic aerosol from strong eruptions is roughly 2-3 y. Attention has consequently focused on their short-term impacts, whereas the long-term, ocean-mediated response has not been well studied. Most studies have focused on tropical eruptions; high-latitude eruptions have drawn less attention because their impacts are thought to be merely hemispheric rather than global. No study to date has investigated the long-term effects of high-latitude eruptions. Here, we use a climate model to show that large summer high-latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere cause strong hemispheric cooling, which could induce an El Nino-like anomaly, in the equatorial Pacific during the first 8-9 mo after the start of the eruption. The hemispherically asymmetric cooling shifts the Intertropical Convergence Zone southward, triggering a weakening of the trade winds over the western and central equatorial Pacific that favors the development of an El Nino-like anomaly. In the model used here, the specified high-latitude eruption also leads to a strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the first 25 y after the eruption, followed by a weakening lasting at least 35 y. The long-lived changes in the AMOC strength also alter the variability of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 112, no 45, 13784-13788 p.
Keyword [en]
high-latitude volcanic eruptions, AMOC-ENSO interaction, volcanism
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-124175DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1509153112ISI: 000364470300038PubMedID: 26504201OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-124175DiVA: diva2:884963
Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2015-12-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pausata, Francesco S. R.Caballero, Rodrigo
By organisation
Department of Meteorology
In the same journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 58 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link