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LPS increases pain sensitivity by decreased pain inhibition and increased insular activation
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Number of Authors: 9
2015 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 49, e1-e1 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have shown that women are more prone to developing LPS-induced pain sensitivity than men, and that the descending endogenous pain inhibition is disrupted in women during experimental systemic inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate some of the central neural mechanisms underlying our previous findings. 51 participants (29 women) were injected with 0.6 ng/kg LPS or saline and went through a thumb-pressure pain fMRI paradigm 2 h after injection. As hypothesized, the subjects injected with LPS had decreased activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), areas involved in descending pain inhibition. In addition, the LPS group had higher activity in the anterior insula, an area involved in medial/affective pain processing and interoception. These effects were not sex dependent. However, the male participants had overall stronger descending pain inhibition, reflected as a stronger rACC activity compared to women. It is possible that the more robust activation of descending pain inhibition rendered the men more resistant to the immune provocation, which may explain previously seen sex differences in LPS-induced pain sensitivity. Our findings give an indication to how the pain matrix is affected during a sickness response. The results strengthen the proposed link between systemic inflammation and weakened pain regulation in chronic pain disorders, and offers a possible mechanism underlying the female predominance in chronic pain disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 49, e1-e1 p.
National Category
Neurosciences Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-124561DOI: 10.1016/j.bbi.2015.06.026Local ID: P-3305OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-124561DiVA: diva2:889869
Conference
The PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society's 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Seattle, USA
Available from: 2015-12-29 Created: 2015-12-29 Last updated: 2016-11-22Bibliographically approved

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Lekander, Mats
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Stress Research Institute
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