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Contemplate your symptoms and re-evaluate your health
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 49, e38-e39 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bodily signals and how these are interpreted affect self-ratings of health. It is thus reasonable that appraisals of health are affected by imminent exposures and disease primes. We aimed to investigate whether self-ratings of health are affected by a symptom rating and if changes are substantiated in persons who report more symptoms. We used data from 813 persons who completed a questionnaire daily for 21 consecutive days. The questionnaire included a one-item self-rating of health (“pre-SRH”; 1 = excellent, 7 = very poor), a subsequent 26-item rating of physical and mental symptoms and thereafter a second (identical) self-rating of health (“post-SRH”). Paired t-tests were used to test for differences between pre-SRH and post-SRH. Mixed effect regression models were used to calculate the interaction effect of pre-SRH and symptom score on post-SRH adjusted for gender, age and if the person had been working that day (13545 observations). SRH worsened significantly (p  <<.0001) after the symptom rating, from 2.72 pre-SRH (95%CI:−2.70–2.74) to 2.77 post-SRH (95%CI:2.75–2.79). There was a significant interaction between pre-SRH and symptoms on post-SRH so that persons who reported more symptoms changed their post-SRH rating to a higher degree than those who reported fewer symptoms, irrespective of their subjective health status. The results support the notion that subjective health perception is affected by focus of attention, and that the effect depends on level of symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 49, e38-e39 p.
National Category
Psychiatry Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-124564DOI: 10.1016/j.bbi.2015.06.147Local ID: P-3308OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-124564DiVA: diva2:889877
Conference
The PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society's 22nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Seattle, USA
Available from: 2015-12-29 Created: 2015-12-29 Last updated: 2016-11-22Bibliographically approved

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Andreasson, Anna N.Schiller, HelenaKecklund, GöranLekander, Mats
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