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Investigating the factorial structure and availability of work time control in a representative sample of the Swedish working population
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Radboud University, The Netherlands.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Swansea University, UK.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 3, 320-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: Past research has often neglected the sub-dimensions of work time control (WTC). Moreover, differences in levels of WTC with respect to work and demographic characteristics have not yet been examined in a representative sample. We investigated these matters in a recent sample of the Swedish working population.

METHODS: The study was based on the 2014 data collection of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. We assessed the structure of the WTC measure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Differences in WTC by work and demographic characteristics were examined with independent sample t-tests, one-way ANOVAs and gender-stratified logistic regressions.

RESULTS: Best model fit was found for a two-factor structure that distinguished between control over daily hours and control over time off (root mean square error of approximation = 0.06; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.09; Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.99). Women, shift and public-sector workers reported lower control in relation to both factors. Age showed small associations with WTC, while a stronger link was suggested for civil status and family situation. Night, roster and rotating shift work seemed to be the most influential factors on reporting low control over daily hours and time off.

CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirm the two-dimensional structure underlying WTC, namely the components 'control over daily hours' and 'control over time off'. Women, public-sector and shift workers reported lower levels of control. Future research should examine the public health implications of WTC, in particular whether increased control over daily hours and time off can reduce health problems associated with difficult working-time arrangements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 44, no 3, 320-328 p.
Keyword [en]
Work time control, flexible work-time arrangements, autonomy, shift work, flexitime, factor analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-125003DOI: 10.1177/1403494815618854ISI: 000373591600013PubMedID: 26620363Local ID: P-3313OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-125003DiVA: diva2:891513
Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-07 Last updated: 2016-05-09Bibliographically approved

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Albrecht, SophieKecklund, GöranTucker, PhilipLeineweber, Constanze
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