Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Tracing terrestrial DOC in the Baltic Sea - a 3-D model study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 30, no 2, 134-148 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fate of terrestrial organic matter brought to the coastal seas by rivers, and its role in the global carbon cycle, are still not very well known. Here the degradation rate of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOCter) is studied in the Baltic Sea, a subarctic semi-enclosed sea, by releasing it as a tracer in a 3-D circulation model and applying linear decay constants. A good agreement with available observational data is obtained by parameterizing the degradation in two rather different ways; one by applying a decay time on the order of 10 years to the whole pool of DOCter, and one by dividing the DOCter into one refractory pool and one pool subject to a decay time on the order of 1 year. The choice of parameterization has a significant effect on where in the Baltic Sea the removal takes place, which can be of importance when modeling the full carbon cycle and the CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. In both cases the biogeochemical decay operates on time scales less than the water residence time. Therefore only a minor fraction of the DOCter reaches the North Sea, whereas approximately 80% is removed by internal sinks within the Baltic Sea. This further implies that DOCter mineralization is an important link in land-sea-atmosphere cycling of carbon in coastal- and shelf seas that are heavily influenced by riverine DOC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 30, no 2, 134-148 p.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-124885DOI: 10.1002/2014GB005078ISI: 000372963900004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-124885DiVA: diva2:891809
Funder
Baltic Ecosystem Adaptive Management (BEAM)
Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-05 Last updated: 2016-04-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fransner, FilippaNycander, JonasMörth, Carl-MagnusHumborg, ChristophGustafsson, ErikDeutsch, Barbara
By organisation
Department of Meteorology Baltic Nest InstituteDepartment of Geological SciencesDepartment of Applied Environmental Science (ITM)
In the same journal
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 272 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link