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Poverty trends during two recessions and two recoveries: Lessons from Sweden 1991—2013
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). University of Oxford, England, UK.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Institute for Future Studies, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
2016 (English)In: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, E-ISSN 2193-9012, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study cross-sectional and long-term poverty in Sweden over a period spanning two recessions, and discuss changes in the policy context. We find large increases in absolute poverty and deprivation during the 1990’s recession but much smaller increases in 2008-2010. While increases in non-employment contributed to increasing poverty in the 1990’s, the temporary poverty increase 2008-2010 was entirely due to growing poverty among non-employed. Relative poverty has increased with little variation across business cycles. Outflow from poverty and long-term poverty respond quickly to macro-economic recovery, but around one percent of the working-aged are quite resistant to such improvements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 5, no 3
Keyword [en]
Poverty, Recessions, Income inequality, Sweden, Long-term poverty, Material deprivation
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-126699DOI: 10.1186/s40174-016-0051-8OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-126699DiVA: diva2:902717
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2016-02-12Bibliographically approved

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Jonsson, Jan O.Mood, CarinaBihagen, Erik
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ReferencesLink to record
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