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Alcohol consumption in very old age and its association with survival: A matter of health and physical function
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Jönköping University, Sweden.
Number of Authors: 4
2016 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 159, 240-245 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Alcohol consumption in very old age is increasing; yet, little is known about the personal and health-related characteristics associated with different levels of alcohol consumption and the association between alcohol consumption and survival among the oldest old. Methods: Nationally representative data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, ages 76-101; n=863) collected in 2010/2011 were used. Mortality was analyzed unti12014. Alcohol consumption was measured with questions about frequency and amount. Drinks per month were calculated and categorized as abstainer, light-to-moderate drinker (0.5-30 drinks/month) and heavy drinker (>30 drinks/month). Multinomial logistic regressions and Laplace regressions were performed. Results: Compared to light-to-moderate drinkers, abstainers had lower levels of education and more functional health problems, while heavy drinkers were more often men, had higher levels of education, and no serious health or functional problems. In models adjusted only for age and sex, abstainers died earlier than drinkers. Among light-to-moderate drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with longer survival, while among heavy drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with shorter survival. However, after adjusting for personal and health-related factors, estimates were lower and no longer statistically significant. Conclusions: The association between alcohol consumption and survival in very old age seems to have an inverse J-shape; abstention and heavy use is associated with shorter survival compared to light-to moderate drinking. To a large extent, differences in survival are due to differences in baseline health and physical function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 159, 240-245 p.
Keyword [en]
Alcohol, Oldest old, Survival, Mortality, Laplace
National Category
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-127354DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.12.022ISI: 000369472200031PubMedID: 26775285OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-127354DiVA: diva2:910938
Available from: 2016-03-10 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2016-03-10Bibliographically approved

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Kelfve, Susanne
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Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)Department of Sociology
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Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health SciencesPsychiatrySubstance Abuse

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