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Language and gender debates: Exploring mass-media and academic discourse on language and gender differences
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This sociolinguistic study investigates the similarities and differences between male and female speech, expressed in two different corpora. The first corpus consists of eight academic articles, and the second consists of eight mass media articles. The main investigation is based on the analysis comparing these two corpora, and the perception of gendered language differences expressed in them. The aim of this study was to view what language and gender perspectives were presented in public newspapers, in relation to proven academic research. This essay presents results that show there is no substantial difference in the language use between men and women. The research articles are presented by publication year, starting with the work by Lakoff from mid-70s to Levon in 2014. Men and women use language differently, however there is evidence indicating that the greater differences are seen within each gender rather than between them, thus specific language is not restricted to one gender but overlaps in use by both genders. Also, the discourse from these academic articles is placed in relation to the mass media articles. The latter articles present language and gender differences as divided into a female language and a male language, as a black and white difference. The mass media articles are in contrast to the academic articles, fairly recent publications in newspapers. The main difference found between the academic and mass media discourse, is that mass media articles presents the issue as almost completely dependent on gender, while the sociolinguistic research proves that language depends on factors such as, sexuality, nationality and identity. Moreover, these two corpora disagree regarding the existence of a female- and a male language.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keywords [en]
Language and Gender, female speech, male speech, sociolinguistic research, gender stereotypical language, language and gender differences, language and gender similarities, woman’s language, men’s language.
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-127736OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-127736DiVA, id: diva2:910951
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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