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War effect on fertility behavior in the Democratic Republic of Congo
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Keyword [en]
Congolese war, fertility transition, first birth, parity-specific fertility, the DRC
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociological Demography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-128973OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-128973DiVA: diva2:918390
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2016-04-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Effects of violent conflict on women and children: Sexual behavior, fertility, and infant mortality in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of violent conflict on women and children: Sexual behavior, fertility, and infant mortality in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis investigates the relationship between violent conflicts and sexual and reproductive health in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The aim of the thesis is to investigate how war affects demographic outcomes across individual life courses. The thesis contributes to the research field by linking macro level conflict data measuring the intensity and frequency of violent conflict with micro level data on women’s sexual and birth histories and infant deaths across time and place.

The results show that war affects infants’ survival and women’s sexual and reproductive health and behavior. The first study finds an increase of premarital first sexual intercourse during the violent conflicts in Rwanda. The second study finds evidence of a delay in the fertility transition due to the Congolese war and the lingering conflicts in East DRC. The third study suggests that the Congolese war affects infant mortality, but only post-neonatal mortality.

Despite consistent evidence that conflict affects the everyday life of women and children, the mechanisms that explain this relationship are largely unknown. This thesis identifies important gaps in the research that limit our understanding of the mechanisms at work. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, 2016
Series
Dissertation series / Stockholm University Demography Unit, ISSN 1404-2304 ; 15
Keyword
Violent conflict, war, premarital first sexual intercourse, fertility transition, infant mortality, Rwanda, the DRC
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociological Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-128977 (URN)978-91-7649-397-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-06-10, Ahlmannsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Submitted.

Available from: 2016-05-18 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2016-05-09Bibliographically approved

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Elveborg Lindskog, Elina
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