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Ancestral sleep
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Biologisk psykologi och behandlingsforskning)
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Number of Authors: 14
2016 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 26, no 7, R271-R272 p.Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While we do not yet understand all the functions of sleep, its critical role for normal physiology and behaviour is evident. Its amount and temporal pattern depend on species and condition. Humans sleep about a third of the day with the longest, consolidated episode during the night. The change in lifestyle from hunter-gatherers via agricultural communities to densely populated industrialized centres has certainly affected sleep, and a major concern in the medical community is the impact of insufficient sleep on health 1 and 2. One of the causal mechanisms leading to insufficient sleep is altered exposure to the natural light–dark cycle. This includes the wide availability of electric light, attenuated exposure to daylight within buildings, and evening use of light-emitting devices, all of which decrease the strength of natural light–dark signals that entrain circadian systems [3].

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 26, no 7, R271-R272 p.
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Biological Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-129895DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.071ISI: 000373273600007PubMedID: 27046809Local ID: P-3342OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-129895DiVA: diva2:926407
Available from: 2016-05-06 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2016-06-08Bibliographically approved

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