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Stuck in a job: Being “locked-in” or at risk of becoming locked-in at the workplace and well-being over time
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2016 (English)In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335, Vol. 30, no 2, 152-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, being “locked-in” at the workplace is conceptualized as being in a non-preferred workplace while at the same time perceiving low employability. The aim of the study was to investigate how being locked-in or at risk of becoming locked-in (being in a non-preferred workplace yet currently satisfied, combined with perceiving low employability) relates to well-being (subjective health and depressive symptoms). The hypotheses were tested in a Swedish longitudinal sample (T1 in 2010 and T2 in 2012) of permanent employees (N = 3491). The results showed that stability with regard to locked-in-related status (being non-locked-in, at risk of becoming locked-in, or locked-in at both T1 and T2) was related to significant and stable differences in well-being. The non-locked-in status was associated with better well-being than being at risk of becoming locked-in. Moreover, those at risk of becoming locked-in showed better well-being than those with stable locked-in status. Changes towards non-locked-in were accompanied by significant improvements in well-being, and changes towards locked-in were associated with impairments in well-being. The relationships that were found could not be attributed to differences in demographic variables and occupational preference. The findings indicate that being locked-in is detrimental to well-being. This has implications for preventative interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 30, no 2, 152-172 p.
Keyword [en]
locked-in, involuntary non-mobility, employability, non-preferred workplace, well-being, career change
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-130570DOI: 10.1080/02678373.2016.1163804ISI: 000375478000003Local ID: P-3342OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-130570DiVA: diva2:931152
Available from: 2016-05-26 Created: 2016-05-26 Last updated: 2016-06-22Bibliographically approved

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Stengård, JohannaBernhard-Oettel, ClaudiaBerntson, ErikLeineweber, ConstanzeAronsson, Gunnar
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Work and organizational psychologyStress Research Institute
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