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Nutritional status and survival among old adults: an 11-year population-based longitudinal study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 6
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 70, no 3, 320-325 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The impact of nutritional status on survival among community-dwelling older adults is unclear. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and association of poor nutritional status, including malnutrition and risk for malnutrition defined by the Mini-Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) with survival, and to explore the role of relevant biomarkers (hemoglobin, albumin and C-reactive protein) in this association. SUBJECTS/METHODS: This study included 3041 participants aged >= 60 in the Swedish National study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen. On the basis of the total score in MNA-SF, nutritional status for each participant was assessed as normal (score 12-14), risk for malnutrition (8-11) or malnutrition (<8). Over an 11-year follow-up, survival status was observed. Data were analysed using logistic regression, flexible parametric survival and Laplace models. RESULTS: Of all the participants, 51 (1.7%) had malnutrition and 751 (24.7%) were at risk for malnutrition. The multi-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of mortality was 2.40 (1.56-3.67; P < 0.001) for malnutrition and 1.49 (1.29 -1.71; P < 0.001) for risk for malnutrition. The median ages at death of participants with malnutrition and risk for malnutrition were similar to 3 and 1.5 years shorter than those with normal nutritional status, respectively, whereas malnutrition or risk for malnutrition together with abnormal biomarker (hemoglobin and albumin) levels was related to 1 year more shortened survival. CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition and risk for malnutrition are highly prevalent and significantly associated with a shorter survival. Poor nutritional status in combination with abnormalities in the biomarkers is associated with even more shortened survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 70, no 3, 320-325 p.
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Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-129228DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2015.109ISI: 000371667700006PubMedID: 26153193OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-129228DiVA: diva2:933765
Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-04-17 Last updated: 2016-06-07Bibliographically approved

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