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Family Composition and Youth Health Risk Behaviors: the Role of Patental Relation and the School Context
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
2017 (English)In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 10, no 2, 403-421 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children not residing with both parents have been shown to be more at risk of negative developmental outcomes than children residing in two-parent families. Few studies have explored how other central contexts may interact with family characteristics to hinder or facilitate youth adjustment. This study examines how aspects of family structure and family processes are associated with youth health risk behaviors and interact with the structural characteristics of schools. The analyses are based on data from the Stockholm School Survey and consist of 5 002 ninth-grade students distributed over 92 schools in the Stockholm area in 2010. School information has been gathered from the Swedish National Agency for Education. Random intercept and fully random models have been used. Results show that adolescents not living with both their parents are more involved in health risk behaviors than adolescents that do. Poor parent–child relations accounts for more of the disadvantage associated with non-traditional family structures than differences in socioeconomic background. Results further suggest that health risk behaviors are more prevalent in more advantaged school settings, net the effect of individual background characteristics. Moreover, advantage school settings are found to accentuate the detrimental effects of poor parent–child relations on health risk behaviors. In conclusion, the study suggests that the effect of family type and family processes on youth behavior is susceptible to contextual effects of the school environment and that more advantage school settings have detrimental direct and indirect effects on youth health risk behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 10, no 2, 403-421 p.
Keyword [en]
Family type, Family characteristics, Parental relations, Risk behaviors, Adolescents, School
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-131453DOI: 10.1007/s12187-016-9380-4ISI: 000401518600006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-131453DiVA: diva2:939692
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-06-27Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Expressions of context: Studies of schools, families, and health risk behaviours
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expressions of context: Studies of schools, families, and health risk behaviours
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores the health behaviours of young people. The main focus is on risk behaviours, i.e. those which may have adverse consequences for health. Two fields of interest are looked at. On the one hand, the thesis explores social determinants of such behaviours, with particular focus on the influence of schools’ structural and social environment on health risk behaviours among youth. On the other hand, the thesis addresses the role of such behaviours in the relationship between childhood social inequalities and adult health. In terms of theory, the study sets out from Coleman's view of the association between structure and agency and the assumption that macro level structures and patterns can be understood on the basis of individual actors’ actions. The thesis consists of four studies addressing different, but related, aspects of the above areas of interest. The overall conclusion of studies I-III is that the school context has direct and indirect effects on young people's risk behaviours. The results of multilevel analyses indicate, more specifically, that students who attend more advantaged schools report more risk behaviours such as smoking, alcohol- and drug use than students at more disadvantaged schools. Self-reported crime is however higher in the more disadvantaged school settings. Further analyses show that a school's social and normative climate also is important for the extent to which youth consume alcohol, smoke, or have used drugs. These risk behaviours are most prevalent in schools where a large proportion of the parents have a more permissive attitude towards alcohol and smoking, and where teacher-rated levels of trust and informal social control (collective efficacy) are high. The results show, further, that school contexts also act indirectly on youth risk behaviours. Young people who reports weak bonds with their parents tend generally to be more involved in risk behaviours than those who report strong bonds. This tendency is reinforced in more advantaged school settings. Finally, Study IV demonstrates that youth risk behaviours act accumulatively and indirectly on later health, rather than directly. Moreover, the importance of risk behaviours for later health varies between the birth cohorts. Health behaviours explain a larger part of the relationship between socioeconomic conditions in childhood and health as an adult in the younger cohort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, 2016. 59 p.
Series
Health Equity Studies, ISSN 1651-5390 ; 20
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-135348 (URN)978-91-7649-512-4 (ISBN)978-91-7649-513-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-12-16, William-Olssonsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-11-05 Last updated: 2016-11-22Bibliographically approved

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