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Contribution of Direct and Indirect Exposure to Human Serum Concentrations of Perfluorooctanoic Acid in an Occupationally Exposed Group of Ski Waxers
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Number of Authors: 4
2016 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 50, no 13, 7037-7046 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The contribution of direct (i.e., uptake of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) itself) and indirect (i.e., uptake of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) and metabolism to PFOA) exposure to PFOA serum concentrations was investigated using a dynamic one compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model. The PK model was applied to six occupationally exposed ski waxers for whom direct and indirect exposures via inhalation were characterized using multiple measurements with personal air sampling devices. The model was able to predict the diverging individual temporal trends of PFOA in serum with correlation coefficients of 0.82-0.94. For the four technicians with high initial concentrations of PFOA in serum (250-1050 ng/mL), the ongoing occupational exposure (both direct and indirect) was of minor importance and net depuration of PFOA was observed throughout the ski season. An estimated average intrinsic elimination half-life of 2.4 years (1.8-3.1 years accounting for variation between technicians and model uncertainty) was derived for these technicians. The remaining two technicians, who had much lower initial serum concentrations (10-17 ng/mL), were strongly influenced by exposure during the ski season with indirect exposure contributing to 45% of PFOA serum concentrations. On the basis of these model simulations, an average metabolism yield of 0.003 (molar concentration basis; uncertainty range of 0.0006-0.01) was derived for transformation of 8:2 FTOH to PFOA. An uncertainty analysis was performed, and it was determined that the input parameters quantifying the intake of PFOA were mainly responsible for the uncertainty of the metabolism yield and the initial concentration of PFOA in serum was mainly contributing to the uncertainty of estimated serum half-lives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 50, no 13, 7037-7046 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences Environmental Engineering
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-132534DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b01477ISI: 000379366300053PubMedID: 27304840OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-132534DiVA: diva2:955275
Available from: 2016-08-25 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2017-03-29Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. From emission sources to human tissues: modelling the exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From emission sources to human tissues: modelling the exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Produced since the 1950’s, per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFASs) substances are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic compounds that are ubiquitous in the environment. Being proteinophilic with a tendency to partition to protein-rich tissues, PFASs have been found in human serum worldwide and in wildlife with a predominance of long-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxilic acids (C7-C14 PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (C6-C9 PFSAs). Due to rising concern regarding their hazardous properties, several regulatory actions and voluntary industrial phase-outs have been conducted since early 2000s, shifting the production towards other fluorinated alternatives. This thesis explores the human exposure to long-chain PFASs and their alternatives using different modelling methods and aims to 1) link comprehensively the past and current industrial production with the human body burden and 2) assess the potential hazardous properties of legacy PFASs replacements, on which information is very limited. In Paper I, the historical daily intakes in Australia and USA were reconstructed from cross-sectional biomonitoring data of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) andperfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS). The results indicate that humans experienced similar exposure levels and trends to PFOS and PFOA in both regions, suggesting a common historical exposure possibly dominated by consumer products. The model could not be fitted to PFHxS concentration in serum. In Paper II, the relative contribution of indirect (i.e. subsequent metabolism of precursors into legacy PFASs) versus direct exposure was evaluated on occupationally exposed ski wax technicians. The indirect exposure contributed by up to 45% to the total body burden of PFOA. In Paper III, the physicochemical properties, the persistence and the long-range transport of fluorinated alternatives were predicted using different in silico tools. Findings suggest that fluorinated alternatives are likely similar to their predecessors, in terms of physicochemical properties and environmental fate. Finally, Paper IV compares the toxic potency of PFOS, PFOA and their alternatives as a function of external and internal dose. While alternatives are less potent than their predecessors when considering the administered dose, they become similarly potent when the assessment is based on levels in the target tissue. This thesis demonstrates that pharmacokinetic models are effective tools to comprehensively reconnect the body burden to the exposure of phased-out chemicals. More importantly, the studies on fluorinated alternatives raise the necessity to provide more information and data on the potential hazard of these novel and emerging products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 2017. 42 p.
Keyword
PFAAs, PFOA, PFOS, fluorinated alternatives, human exposure, pharmacokinetic modelling, hazard assessment
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-141034 (URN)978-91-7649-712-8 (ISBN)978-91-7649-713-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-05-12, Nordenskiöldsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-03-29 Last updated: 2017-04-03Bibliographically approved

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