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Quick returns and night work as predictors of sleep quality, fatigue, work-family balance and satisfaction with work hours
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Swansea University, UK.
Number of Authors: 4
2016 (English)In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 33, no 6, 759-767 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Quick returns (intervals of <11 h between the end of one shift and the start of the next) are associated with short sleeps and fatigue on the subsequent shift. Recent evidence suggests that shift workers regard quick returns as being more problematic than night work. The current study explored quick returns and night work in terms of their impact on sleep, unwinding, recovery, exhaustion, satisfaction with work hours and work-family interference. Data from the 2006 cohort of Swedish nursing students within the national Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education (LANE) study were analysed (N = 1459). Respondents completed a questionnaire prior to graduation (response rate 69.2%) and 3 years after graduation (65.9%). The analyses examined associations between frequency of quick returns and night work and measures taken in year three, while adjusting for confounding factors (in year three and prior graduation). Frequency of quick returns was a significant predictor of poor sleep quality, short sleeps, unwinding, exhaustion, satisfaction with work hours and work-to-family interference, with higher frequency predicting more negative outcomes. Quick returns did not predict recovery after rest days. Frequency of night work did not predict any of the outcomes. In conclusion, quick returns were an important determinant of sleep, recovery and wellbeing, whereas night work did not show such an association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 33, no 6, 759-767 p.
Keyword [en]
Night work, nurses, quick returns, sleep, wellbeing
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-132604DOI: 10.3109/07420528.2016.1167725ISI: 000379779500023PubMedID: 27082143OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-132604DiVA: diva2:955738
Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2016-08-26Bibliographically approved

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