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  • 1. A. Madsen, Kevin
    et al.
    J. Bergholtz, Emil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Brouwer, Piet W.
    Josephson effect in a Weyl SNS junction2017In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 95, no 6, 064511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We calculate the Josephson current density j (phi) for a Weyl superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor junction for which the outer terminals are superconducting Weylmetals and the normal layer is a Weyl (semi) metal. We describe the Weyl (semi) metal using a simple model with two Weyl points. The model has broken time-reversal symmetry, but inversion symmetry is present. We calculate the Josephson current for both zero and finite temperature for the two pairing mechanisms inside the superconductors that have been proposed in the literature, zero-momentum BCS-like pairing and finite-momentum FFLO-like pairing, and assuming the short-junction limit. For both pairing types we find that the current is proportional to the normal-state junction conductivity, with a proportionality coefficient that shows quantitative differences between the two pairing mechanisms. The current for the BCS-like pairing is found to be independent of the chemical potential, whereas the current for the FFLO-like pairing is not.

  • 2.
    A. Molnar, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Public Research Centre Henri Tudor, , .
    A. Proper, HenderikPublic Research Centre Henri Tudor, , .Zdravkovic, JelenaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Loucopoulos, PericleUniversity of Manchester, , .Pastor, OscarUniversitat Politècnica de València, , Centro de Investigación PROS.de Kinderen, SybrenUniversity of Luxembourg, , .
    CBI Workshops: TEE and CoBI: The 8th Workshop on Transformation & Engineering of Enterprises (TEE 2014) The 1st International Workshop on Capability-oriented Business Informatics (CoBI 2014) 2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. A. Viggiano, A
    et al.
    M. Midey and A. Ehlerding, A
    Kinetics of the reactions of ONOO- with small molecules2006In: International journal of mass spectrometry, Vol. 255, 65- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    A. Zheltukhin, A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Unification of twistors and Ramond vectors2007In: Physics letters B, Vol. 658, 82- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Aad, G.
    et al.
    Abbott, B.
    Abdallah, J.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section with ATLAS in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV in dilepton final states2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A measurement is presented of the production cross section of top quark pairs (σ_{\ttbar{}}) in proton-proton (pp) collisions at √s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Using a data sample of 35 pb−1, candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse energy, \met{}, and at least two jets.

    A baseline analysis employing kinematic properties of the candidate events to separate the signal from background and using data-driven techniques to determine the most important backgrounds, results in a measurement ofσ_{\ttbar{}} = 173 ± 22(stat.)+18 −16(syst.)+8 −7(lum.) pb,

    where the three uncertainties are from statistics, systematics and integrated luminosity, respectively.

    We also perform a cross section measurement requiring at least one b-tagged jet and a looser kinematic selection that increases the signal-to-background ratio, yielding

    σ_{\ttbar{}} = 171 ± 22(stat.)+21 -16(syst.)+7 −6(lum.) pb.

    Additional studies are performed to corroborate these measurements; a technique that normalizes the \ttbar{} signal yield to the measured rate of Z decays, a two-dimensional template shape fit using the \met{} vs the number of jets to simultaneously measure the production cross sections of \ttbar{}, WW and Z → ττ final states, and a simultaneous measurement of σ_{\ttbar{}} and the b-tagging efficiency using the distribution of the number of tagged jets in each event.

    All the measurements are in good agreement with each other and the Standard Model prediction.

  • 6. Aad, G.
    et al.
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hidvégi, Attila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, K. Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lesser, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Nordkvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ramstedt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Selldén, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zutshi, V.
    Search for New Particles in Two-Jet Final States in 7 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC2010In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 105, no 16, 161801- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search for new heavy particles manifested as resonances in two-jet final states is presented. The data were produced in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions by the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 315 nb(-1) collected by the ATLAS detector. No resonances were observed. Upper limits were set on the product of cross section and signal acceptance for excited-quark (q*) production as a function of q* mass. These exclude at the 95% C. L. the q* mass interval 0: 30< m(q)*< 1:26 TeV, extending the reach of previous experiments.

  • 7. Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie
    et al.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Cooper, Angela
    McDonald, James
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Patients’ Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017In: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, no 2, 175-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients’ in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients’ adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients’ immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients’ in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 8.
    Aagaard, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Underhållsbidrag till make efter äktenskapsskillnad: en probleminventering2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berger, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The evolution of alternative developmental pathways: footprints of selection on life-history traits in a butterfly2012In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 25, no 7, 1377-1388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental pathways may evolve to optimize alternative phenotypes across environments. However, the maintenance of such adaptive plasticity under relaxed selection has received little study. We compare the expression of life-history traits across two developmental pathways in two populations of the butterfly Pararge aegeria where both populations express a diapause pathway but one never expresses direct development in nature. In the population with ongoing selection on both pathways, the difference between pathways in development time and growth rate was larger, whereas the difference in body size was smaller compared with the population experiencing relaxed selection on one pathway. This indicates that relaxed selection on the direct pathway has allowed life-history traits to drift towards values associated with lower fitness when following this pathway. Relaxed selection on direct development was also associated with a higher degree of genetic variation for protandry expressed as within-family sexual dimorphism in growth rate. Genetic correlations for larval growth rate across sexes and pathways were generally positive, with the notable exception of correlation estimates that involved directly developing males of the population that experienced relaxed selection on this pathway. We conclude that relaxed selection on one developmental pathway appears to have partly disrupted the developmental regulation of life-history trait expression. This in turn suggests that ongoing selection may be responsible for maintaining adaptive developmental regulation along alternative developmental pathways in these populations.

  • 10.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Diapause induction and relaxed selection on alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2015In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 84, no 2, 464-472 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life-history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 11.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    The development and expression of seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits in the butterfly Pararge aegeriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Latitudinal phenological adaptation: diapause induction and differentiation between alternative developmental pathways in a butterflyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway.

    2. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch, and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development.

    3. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch.

    4. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 13.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The diapause switch: Evolution of alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diapause decision is a classic example of a threshold switch mechanism with cascading effects on morphology, behaviour and life-history traits. This thesis addresses the downstream effects of the insect diapause switch, with the main focus on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits, using the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria) as a study species. The ultimate pathway decision is made towards the end of larval development and allows the larvae to take into account up-to-date information from the environment about future conditions (Paper I, IV). However, already from an early point in development the larvae are sensitive to environmental cues and continuously adjust their growth trajectory in accordance to current information about the environmental conditions to be expected in future (Paper IV). An asymmetry in the ability to change from one developmental pathway to another at a late point in larval development suggests that the diapause and the direct pathway require different physiological preparations (Paper IV). Pathway-specific regulation of traits downstream of the diapause switch is maintained by ongoing selection. When the direct pathway is not regularly expressed, as with a shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism, relaxed selection on the unexpressed pathway leads to genetic drift and loss of protandry (Paper II, III). Natural populations display local adaptations in the diapause switch with an increase in critical daylengths as there is a gradual shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism (Paper III). This thesis highlights two aspects of the diapause decision, the determination of how and when this decision is made as well as the way the resulting pathways are moulded by selection in order to produce adaptive seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits.

  • 14. Aalbers, J.
    et al.
    Agostini, F.
    Alfonsi, M.
    Amaro, F. D.
    Amsler, C.
    Aprile, E.
    Arazi, L.
    Arneodo, F.
    Barrow, P.
    Baudis, L.
    Benabderrahmane, M. L.
    Berger, T.
    Beskers, B.
    Breskin, A.
    Breur, P. A.
    Brown, A.
    Brown, E.
    Bruenner, S.
    Bruno, G.
    Budnik, R.
    Butikofer, L.
    Calvén, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cardoso, J. M. R.
    Cichon, D.
    Coderre, D.
    Colijn, A. P.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cussonneau, J. P.
    Decowski, M. P.
    Diglio, S.
    Drexlin, G.
    Duchovni, E.
    Erdal, E.
    Eurin, G.
    Ferella, Alfredo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Fieguth, A.
    Fulgione, W.
    Rosso, A. Gallo
    Di Gangi, P.
    Di Giovanni, A.
    Galloway, M.
    Garbini, M.
    Geis, C.
    Glueck, F.
    Grandi, L.
    Greene, Z.
    Grignon, C.
    Hasterok, C.
    Hannen, V.
    Hogenbirk, E.
    Howlett, J.
    Hilk, D.
    Hils, C.
    James, A.
    Kaminsky, B.
    Kazama, S.
    Kilminster, B.
    Kish, A.
    Krauss, L. M.
    Landsman, H.
    Lang, R. F.
    Lin, Q.
    Linde, F. L.
    Lindemann, S.
    Lindner, M.
    Lopes, J. A. M.
    Undagoitia, T. Marrodan
    Masbou, J.
    Massoli, F. V.
    Mayani, D.
    Messina, M.
    Micheneau, K.
    Molinario, A.
    Morå, Knut D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Morteau, E.
    Murra, M.
    Naganoma, J.
    Newstead, J. L.
    Ni, K.
    Oberlack, U.
    Pakarha, P.
    Pelssers, Bart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    de Perio, P.
    Persiani, R.
    Piastra, F.
    Piro, M. C.
    Plante, G.
    Rauch, L.
    Reichard, S.
    Rizzo, A.
    Rupp, N.
    Dos Santos, J. M. F.
    Sartorelli, G.
    Scheibelhut, M.
    Schindler, S.
    Schumann, M.
    Schreiner, J.
    Lavina, L. Scotto
    Selvi, M.
    Shagin, P.
    Silva, M. C.
    Simgen, H.
    Sissol, P.
    von Sivers, M.
    Thers, D.
    Thum, J.
    Tiseni, A.
    Trotta, R.
    Tunnell, C. D.
    Valerius, K.
    Vargas, M. A.
    Wang, H.
    Wei, Y.
    Weinheimer, C.
    Wester, T.
    Wulf, J.
    Zhang, Y.
    Zhu, T.
    Zuber, K.
    DARWIN: towards the ultimate dark matter detector2016In: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, ISSN 1475-7516, E-ISSN 1475-7516, no 11, 017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DARk matter WImp search with liquid xenoN (DARWIN(2)) will be an experiment for the direct detection of dark matter using a multi-ton liquid xenon time projection chamber at its core. Its primary goal will be to explore the experimentally accessible parameter space for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in a wide mass-range, until neutrino interactions with the target become an irreducible background. The prompt scintillation light and the charge signals induced by particle interactions in the xenon will be observed by VUV sensitive, ultra-low background photosensors. Besides its excellent sensitivity to WIMPs above a mass of 5 GeV/c(2), such a detector with its large mass, low-energy threshold and ultra-low background level will also be sensitive to other rare interactions. It will search for solar axions,galactic axion-like particles and the neutrinoless double-beta decay of Xe-136, as well as measure the low-energy solar neutrino flux with <1% precision, observe coherent neutrino-nucleus interactions, and detect galactic supernovae. We present the concept of the DARWIN detector and discuss its physics reach, the main sources of backgrounds and the ongoing detector design and R&D efforts.

  • 15. Aalst, Will
    et al.
    Shaw, Michael J.Szyperski, ClemensStirna, JanisStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Persson, Anne
    The Practice of Enterprise Modeling: first IFIP WG 8.1 Working Conference (PoEM 2008), proceedings2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 16. Aalto, A
    et al.
    Nikkinen, J
    Peltomäki, Jarkko
    Vähämaa, S
    Profitability and Diversification Benefits of Momentum Strategies on Commodity Index Futures2011In: International Journal of Accounting and Finance, ISSN 1752-8232, Vol. 3, no 1, 21-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Aaltonen, Mikko
    et al.
    Skardhamar, Torbjørn
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Højsgaard Andersen, Lars
    Bäckman, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Estrada, Felipe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Danielsson, Petri
    Comparing Employment Trajectories before and after First Imprisonment in Four Nordic Countries2017In: British Journal of Criminology, ISSN 0007-0955, E-ISSN 1464-3529, Vol. 57, no 4, 828-847 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employment plays a crucial role in the re-entry process and in reducing recidivism among offenders released from prison. But at the same time, imprisonment is generally regarded as harmful to post-release employment prospects. Little is known, however, about whether or not offenders’ employment trajectories before and after imprisonment are similar across countries. As a first step towards filling this gap in research, this paper provides evidence on employment trajectories before and after imprisonment in four Nordic welfare states: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Using data gathered from administrative records on incarcerated offenders, the analysis focuses on individuals imprisoned for the first time and who served a prison sentence less than one year in length. Results show that although employment trajectories develop in mostly similar ways before and after imprisonment across these countries, important differences exist.

  • 18. Aaltonen, Olli
    et al.
    Hellström, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Peltola, Maija S.
    Savela, Janne
    Tamminen, Henna
    Lehtola, Heidi
    Brain responses reveal hardwired detection of native-language rule violations2008In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 444, no 1, 56-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a neural correlate of the preattentive detection of any change in the acoustic characteristics of sounds. Here we provide evidence that violations of a purely phonological constraint in a listener's native language can also elicit the brain's automatic change-detection response. The MMN differed between Finnish and Estonian listeners, conditions being equal except for the native language of the listeners. We used two experimental conditions: synthetic vowels in isolation and the same vowels embedded in a pseudo-word context. MMN responses to isolated vowels were similar for Finns and Estonians, while the same vowels in a pseudoword context elicited different MMN patterns depending on the listener's mother tongue.

  • 19. Aamaas, Borgar
    et al.
    Boggild, Carl Egede
    Stordal, Frode
    Berntsen, Terje
    Holmen, Kim
    Ström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Elemental carbon deposition to Svalbard snow from Norwegian settlements and long-range transport2011In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 63, no 3, 340-351 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact on snow pack albedo from local elemental carbon (EC) sources in Svalbard has been investigated for the winter of 2008. Highly elevated EC concentrations in the snow are observed around the settlements of Longyearbyen and Svea (locally > 1000 ng g(-1), about 200 times over the background level), while EC concentrations similar to the background level are seen around Ny-Alesund. Near Longyearbyen and Svea, darkened snow influenced by wind transported coal dust from open coal stockpiles is clearly visible from satellite images and by eye at the ground. As a first estimate, the reduction in snow albedo caused by local EC pollution from the Norwegian settlements has been compared to the estimated reduction caused by long-range transported EC for entire Svalbard. The effect of local EC from Longyearbyen, Svea and all Norwegian settlements are estimated to 2.1%, 7.9% and 10% of the total impact of EC, respectively. The EC particles tend to stay on the surface during melting, and elevated EC concentrations due to the spring melt was observed. This accumulation of EC enhances the positive albedo feedbacks. The EC concentrations were observed to be larger in metamorphosed snow than in fresh snow, and especially around ice lenses.

  • 20.
    Aare, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    "What is it like to be one of these people?": Narrativa strategier för att skapa inlevelse i reportage2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The eyewitnessed reportage has a pronounced character of narrating. The imaginative power of the text helps the reader to empathise with the characters. That makes constructing empathy a necessary skill of reporters. But how can this be done?

    Despite a tradition of story telling among reporters, narratologists virtually have neglected the reportage genre. The purpose of this thesis is to examine how narrative strategies can be used in reportages and, at the same time, suggest methods for investigating those strategies. The main question is: How can empathy be constructed? Empathy is here defined as a function of presence, perspective, selection and disnarration. A screen of covert values is also added.

    The study applies a narratological and a media rhetorical approach to journalistic narratives, and focus is on basic discussions supported by analysis samples. Theories by Gérard Genette, Dorrit Cohn, Seymor Chatman, William C. Booth, Gerald Prince, Göran Rossholm, Bengt Nerman and others are discussed.

    Even though a reportage is about real events, it always represents a personal interpretation. It presents the readers with a represented reality. In a narratological model for the macro level of the reportage I identify the trait of construction as an interaction between three instances: the producer (i. e. the implied author), the narrator and the experiencing reporter. On a micro level this model helps me to explain, for example, how a homodiegetic narrator can be combined with external focalisation, and how another character than the experiencing reporter can be focalised. In the former case I examine the interplay between showing and telling relative to the narrator’s visibility. In the latter case I especially focus on a complex technique for shifting perspectives, both those concerning thoughts, like Free, Indirect Discourse (FID), and those concerning perception. At the same time I study different degrees of perspectivity.  

  • 21.
    Aare, Kätlin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Respiratory patterns and turn-taking in spontaneous Estonian: Inhalation amplitude in multiparty conversations2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the relationship between inhalation amplitude and turn-taking in spontaneous multiparty conversations held in Estonian. Respiratory activity is recorded with Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography. The main focus is on how inhalation amplitude varies between the inhalations produced directly before turn onset compared to the following inhalations within the same speaking turn. The results indicate a significant difference in amplitude, realised mainly by an increase in inhalation end lung volume values. One of the possible functions of this pattern is to signal an intention of taking the conversational turn. Another could be a phrasing or grouping function connected to lower inhalation amplitudes within turns.

  • 22.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Inhalation amplitude and turn-taking in spontaneous Estonian conversations2015In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2015 Lund, June 8-10, 2015 / [ed] Malin Svensson Lundmark, Gilbert Ambrazaitis, Joost van de Weijer, Lund: Lund University , 2015, 1-5 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationship between inhalation amplitude and turn management in four approximately 20 minute long spontaneous multiparty conversations in Estonian. The main focus of interest is whether inhalation amplitude is greater before turn onset than in the following inhalations within the same speaking turn. The results show that inhalations directly before turn onset are greater in amplitude than those later in the turn. The difference seems to be realized by ending the inhalation at a greater lung volume value, whereas the initial lung volume before inhalation onset remains roughly the same across a single turn. The findings suggest that the increased inhalation amplitude could function as a cue for claiming the conversational floor.

  • 23.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, 47-52 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

  • 24. Aarne, Päivikki
    et al.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Risholm Mothander, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tallberg, Ing-Mari
    Parent-rated socio-emotional development in children with language impairment in comparison with typically developed children2014In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610, Vol. 11, no 3, 279-291 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with language impairment (LI) and children with typical development (TD) were assessed by their respective parents using The MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories (Swedish version SECDI) and Greenspan Socio Emotional Growth Chart (GSEGC). The aim was to investigate socio-emotional and language development in children with LI and TD with respect to possible differential patterns and relations between the groups. The results highlight a clear association between language and socio-emotional development. Children with LI were rated similar to young language-matched children with TD, but significantly lower relative to age-matched TD children, particularly concerning symbolic stages of development: the use of linguistic symbols as well as related areas such as symbol play and symbolic mental ability. The results are discussed in light of presumable background factors and possible consequences for children or sub-groups of children with LI.

  • 25.
    Aarni, Teddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities.
    The Kalunga concept in Ovambo religion from 1870 onwards1982Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Aarnio, Klaus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Rules and discretion in CRD IV, BRRD and MiFID 2: a challenge to competent authorities?2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 27.
    Aaro Jonsson, Catherine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Long-term cognitive outcome of childhood traumatic brain injury2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited knowledge of cognitive outcome extending beyond 5 years after childhood traumatic brain injury, CTBI. The main objectives of this thesis were to investigate cognitive outcome at 6-14 years after CTBI, and to evaluate if advancements in the neurosurgical care, starting 1992, did influence long-term outcome and early epidemiology. An additional aim was to study the relationship between early brain injury parameters and early functional outcome. Study 1 evaluated cognitive progress during 14 years after CTBI, over three neuropsychological assessments in 8 patients with serious CTBI. Study 2 used patient records to investigate early epidemiology, received rehabilitation and medical follow up in two clinical cohorts, n=82 and n=46, treated neurosurgically for CTBI before and after 1992. An exploratory cluster analysis was applied to analyse the relation between early brain injury severity parameters and early functional outcome. In Study 3, participants in the two cohorts, n=18 and n=23, treated neurosurgically for CTBI before and after 1992, were subject to an extensive neuropsychological assessment, 13 and 6 years after injury, respectively. Assessment results of the two cohorts were compared with each other and with controls. Data were analysed with multivariate analyses of variance. Results and discussion. There were significant long-term cognitive deficits of similar magnitude and character in the two cohorts with CTBI, treated before and after the advancements in neurosurgical care. At 6-14 years after injury, long-term deficits in verbal intellectual and executive functions were found, and were discussed in terms of their late maturation and a decreased executive control over verbal memory-functions after CTBI. Visuospatial functions had a slightly better long-term recovery. The amount of rehabilitation received was equally low in both cohorts. The length of time spent in intensive care and the duration of care in the respirator may have a stronger relationship to early outcome than does a single measure of level of consciousness at admission. Main conclusions are that cognitive deficits are apparent at long-term follow up, 6-13 years after neurosurgically treated CTBI, even after advancements in the neurosurgical care in Sweden. Measures of verbal IQ, verbal memory and executive functions were especially low while visuospatial intellectual functions appear to have a better long-term recovery.

  • 28. Aaro Jonsson, Catherine C.
    et al.
    Emanuelson, Ingrid M.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Variability in quality of life 13 years after traumatic brain injury in childhood2014In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 37, no 4, 317-322 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the aim of describing variability in the long-term outcome of quality of life after neurosurgically treated pediatric traumatic brain injury, mostly self-reports of 21 individuals with mild or moderate/severe injury were gathered using Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory in telephone interviews 13 years aftyer injury. A majority of the participants reported brain injury-related problems. The median outcome on Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory was mild to moderate limitations. The variation within the moderate/severe group varied between relatively good outcome and moderate/severe limitations. Concentration, irritability, fatigue, and transportation were reported as the most problematic areas, whereas self-care was reported as well functioning. Societal participation appeared to be the best functional domain in this Swedish study. Examples of individual reports of the life-situation at various outcome levels were provided. Variability in outcome is large within severity groups, and research may gain by addressing both outcomes of the individuals and groups. Objective questions of outcome should be accompanied by questions of actual functioning in everyday life. To ensure long-term support for quality of life for those with remaining dysfunction after pediatric traumatic brain injury, healthcare systems should implement systematic routines for referral to rehabilitation and support.

  • 29. Aaro Jonsson, Catherine
    et al.
    Catroppa, Cathy
    Godfrey, Celia
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Anderson, Vicki
    Cognitive Recovery and Development after Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood: A Person-Oriented, Longitudinal Study2013In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 30, no 2, 76-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Influence of childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) on cognitive recovery and subsequent development is poorly understood. In this longitudinal study we used cluster analysis to explore acute stage individual profiles of injury age and cognition in 118 children with traumatic brain injury. Repeated measures of cognitive function were conducted at 30 months, indicating recovery, and 10 years post-injury, indicating development. Nine clusters were identified. Recovery was evident in three clusters, two of them with low functioning profiles. Developmental gains occurred for three clusters and an acute profile of higher freedom from distractibility (FFD) and lower processing speed (PS) was related to positive differences. One cluster, average low functioning and especially low verbal comprehension, demonstrated a slower development than peers. This suggests that developmental change after TBI in childhood takes place on a continuum, with both chance of long-term catching up, and risk of poor development. An acute profile of higher FFD and lower PS seemed to reflect injury consequences and were followed by developmental gains. These results challenge previous findings, and warrant further investigation.

  • 30.
    Aaro Jonsson, Catherine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Horneman, Göran
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Emanuelson, Ingrid
    Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg.
    Neuropsychological progress during 14 yearsafter severe traumatic brain injury in childhoodand adolescence2004In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301x, Vol. 18, no 9, 921-934 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the impact of time since injury on  neuropsychological and psychosocial outcome after serious TBI in childhood or adolescence. Methods: The subjects were eight patients with serious TBI sustained at a mean age of 14 years who had been assessed neuropsychological at one, seven and 14 years after TBI. A retrospective longitudinal design was chosen to describe the development in six neuropsychological domains on basis of the assessments. Psychosocial data were gathered from clinical knowledge and a semi-structured interview at 14 years after TBI. Results: Performance of verbal IQ shows a declining trend over the three assessments, that the performance of attention and working memory is low and that verbal learning is the cognitive domain, which exhibits the largest impairments. The main psychosocial result is that three of the eight subjects go from a school situation with no adjustments to adult life with an early retirement. Conclusions: Time since insult is an important factor when assessing outcome after TBI in childhood and adolescence and that assessment of final outcome should not be done before adulthood.

  • 31.
    Aaro Jonsson, Catherine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Leis Ljungmark, Mia
    Institution for clinical sciences, Dept. of pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University.
    Emanuelson, Ingrid
    Institution for clinical sciences, Dept. of pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University.
    Long-term cognitive outcome after neurosurgically treated childhood traumatic brain injury2009In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301x, Vol. 23, no 13-14, 1008-1016 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the cognitive long term outcome of two cohorts of patients neurosurgically treated for childhood traumatic brain injury (CTBI), either in 1987-1991 according to an older concept, or 1997-2001 with a stronger emphasis on volume targeted interventions. Research design and methods: Participants in the two cohorts were subject to an extensive neuropsychological assessment, 13.2 and 6.1 years post injury, respectively. In a between group design, assessment results of the two cohorts, n 18 and n 23, were compared to each other and to controls. Data were analyzed with multivariate analyses of variance. Results: Long-term cognitive deficits for both groups of similar magnitude and character were observed in both groups. Abilities were especially low regarding executive and memory function and verbal IQ. The cognitive results are discussed in terms of  vulnerability of verbal functions and decreased executive control over memory-functions. Conclusions: There is a definite need for long term follow up of cognitive deficits after neurosurgically treated CTBI, also with the newer neurosurgical concept. Verbal learning and the executive control over memory functions should be addressed with interventions aimed at restoration, coping and compensation.

  • 32. Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Spel, familjeliv och virtuella ru2007In: Virtuella lekar och digitala berättelser: Perspektiv på datorspel, Studentlitteratur, Lund , 2007, 85-103 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33. Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Forsberg, Lucas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Producing children's corporeal privacy: Ethnographic video recording as material-discursive practice2010In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, Vol. 10, no 2, 249-268 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the use of video cameras in participant observation drawing on approximately 300 hours of video data from an ethnographic study of Swedish family life. Departing from Karen Barad’s post-humanistic perspective on scientific practices, the aim is to critically analyse how researchers, research participants and technology produce and negotiate children’s corporeal privacy. Ethnographic videotaping is understood as a material- discursive practice that creates and sustains boundaries between private and public, where videotaping is ideologically connected to a public sphere that may at times ‘intrude’ on children’s corporeal privacy. The limits of corporeal privacy are never fixed, but open for negotiation; ethnographers may therefore unintentionally transgress the boundary and thus be faced with ethical dilemmas. The fluidity of privacy calls for ethical reflexivity before, during and after fieldwork, and researchers must be sensitive to when ethical issues are at hand and how to deal with them.

  • 34. Aarsand, Pål
    et al.
    Forsberg, Lucas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    De öppna och stängda dörrarnas moral: Dilemman i deltagande observation med videokamera2009In: Den väsentliga vardagen: Några diskursanalytiska perspektiv på tal, text och bild, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2009, 148-168 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35. Aarskaug Wiik, Kenneth
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Cohabiting and Married Individuals' Relations With Their Partner's Parents2017In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 79, no 4, 1111-1124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Norwegian survey data on partnered individuals ages 18 to 55 (N = 4,061; 31% cohabitors), the current study investigated differences across marital and cohabiting unions regarding the patterns of contact with the parents of the partner. In addition to investigating the frequency of such contact, we assessed the nature of and perceived quality of contacts with the partner's parents. The authors grouped respondents according to whether they had children with their partner and controlled for a range of selection characteristics. Results confirmed that parents with preschool children met their in-laws more frequently than the childless, irrespective of union type. Married respondents as well as cohabitors with preschool children reported better relations with their partner's parents than childless cohabitors. Taken together, the results imply that having small children was more decisive for the relationship with the parents of the partner than getting married, particularly with regard to contact frequency.

  • 36. Aarts, Alexander A.
    et al.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Zuni, Kellylynn
    Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 349, no 6251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.

  • 37. Aartsen, M. G.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Adams, J.
    Aguilar, J. A.
    Ahlers, M.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Altmann, D.
    Anderson, T.
    Arguelles, C.
    Arlen, T. C.
    Auffenberg, J.
    Bai, X.
    Barwick, S. W.
    Baum, V.
    Bay, R.
    Beatty, J. J.
    Tjus, J. Becker
    Becker, K. -H
    BenZvi, S.
    Berghaus, P.
    Berley, D.
    Bernardini, E.
    Bernhard, A.
    Besson, D. Z.
    Binder, G.
    Bindig, D.
    Bissok, M.
    Blaufuss, E.
    Blumenthal, J.
    Boersma, D. J.
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bos, F.
    Bose, D.
    Boeser, S.
    Botner, O.
    Brayeur, L.
    Bretz, H. -P
    Brown, A. M.
    Brunner, J.
    Buzinsky, N.
    Casey, J.
    Casier, M.
    Cheung, E.
    Chirkin, D.
    Christov, A.
    Christy, B.
    Clark, K.
    Classen, L.
    Clevermann, F.
    Coenders, S.
    Cowen, D. F.
    Silva, A. H. Cruz
    Daughhetee, J.
    Davis, J. C.
    Day, M.
    de Andre, J. P. A. M.
    De Clercq, C.
    De Ridder, S.
    Desiati, P.
    de Vries, K. D.
    de With, M.
    De Young, T.
    Diaz-Velez, J. C.
    Dunkman, M.
    Eagan, R.
    Eberhardt, B.
    Eichmann, B.
    Eisch, J.
    Euler, S.
    Evenson, P. A.
    Fadiran, O.
    Fazely, A. R.
    Fedynitch, A.
    Feintzeig, J.
    Felde, J.
    Feusels, T.
    Filimonov, K.
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Fischer-Wasels, T.
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Franckowiak, A.
    Frantzen, K.
    Fuchs, T.
    Gaisser, T. K.
    Gaior, R.
    Gallagher, J.
    Gerhardt, L.
    Gier, D.
    Gladstone, L.
    Gluesenkamp, T.
    Goldschmidt, A.
    Golup, G.
    Gonzalez, J. G.
    Goodman, J. A.
    Gora, D.
    Grant, D.
    Gretskov, P.
    Groh, J. C.
    Gross, A.
    Ha, C.
    Haack, C.
    Ismail, A. Haj
    Hallen, P.
    Hallgren, A.
    Halzen, F.
    Hanson, K.
    Hebecker, D.
    Heereman, D.
    Heinen, D.
    Helbing, K.
    Hellauer, R.
    Hellwig, D.
    Hickford, S.
    Hill, G. C.
    Hoffman, K. D.
    Hoffmann, R.
    Homeier, A.
    Hoshina, K.
    Huang, F.
    Huelsnitz, W.
    Hulth, Per Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hussain, S.
    Ishihara, A.
    Jacobi, E.
    Jacobsen, J.
    Jagielski, K.
    Japaridze, G. S.
    Jero, K.
    Jlelati, O.
    Jurkovic, M.
    Kaminsky, B.
    Kappes, A.
    Karg, T.
    Karle, A.
    Kauer, M.
    Keivani, A.
    Kelley, J. L.
    Kheirandish, A.
    Kiryluk, J.
    Klaes, J.
    Klein, S. R.
    Koehne, J. -H
    Kohnen, G.
    Kolanoski, H.
    Koob, A.
    Koepke, L.
    Kopper, C.
    Kopper, S.
    Koskinen, D. J.
    Kowalski, M.
    Kriesten, A.
    Krings, K.
    Kroll, G.
    Kroll, M.
    Kunnen, J.
    Kurahashi, N.
    Kuwabara, T.
    Labare, M.
    Lanfranchi, J. L.
    Larsen, D. T.
    Larson, M. J.
    Lesiak-Bzdak, M.
    Leuermann, M.
    Luenemann, J.
    Madsen, J.
    Maggi, G.
    Maruyama, R.
    Mase, K.
    Matis, H. S.
    Maunu, R.
    McNally, F.
    Meagher, K.
    Medici, M.
    Meli, A.
    Meures, T.
    Miarecki, S.
    Middell, E.
    Middlemas, E.
    Milke, N.
    Miller, J.
    Mohrmann, L.
    Montaruli, T.
    Morse, R.
    Nahnhauer, R.
    Naumann, U.
    Niederhausen, H.
    Nowicki, S. C.
    Nygren, D. R.
    Obertacke, A.
    Odrowski, S.
    Olivas, A.
    Omairat, A.
    O'Murchadha, A.
    Palczewski, T.
    Paul, L.
    Penek, Oe.
    Pepper, J. A.
    de los Heros, C. Perez
    Pfendner, C.
    Pieloth, D.
    Pinat, E.
    Posselt, J.
    Price, P. B.
    Przybylski, G. T.
    Puetz, J.
    Quinnan, M.
    Raedel, L.
    Rameez, M.
    Rawlins, K.
    Redl, P.
    Rees, I.
    Reimann, R.
    Relich, M.
    Resconi, E.
    Rhode, W.
    Richman, M.
    Riedel, B.
    Robertson, S.
    Rodrigues, J. P.
    Rongen, M.
    Rott, C.
    Ruhe, T.
    Ruzybayev, B.
    Ryckbosch, D.
    Saba, S. M.
    Sander, H. -G
    Sandroos, J.
    Santander, M.
    Sarkar, S.
    Schatto, K.
    Scheriau, F.
    Schmidt, T.
    Schmitz, M.
    Schoenen, S.
    Schoeneberg, S.
    Schoenwald, A.
    Schukraft, A.
    Schulte, L.
    Schulz, O.
    Seckel, D.
    Sestayo, Y.
    Seunarine, S.
    Shanidze, R.
    Smith, M. W. E.
    Soldin, D.
    Spiczak, G. M.
    Spiering, C.
    Stamatikos, M.
    Stanev, T.
    Stanisha, N. A.
    Stasik, A.
    Stezelberger, T.
    Stokstad, R. G.
    Stoessl, A.
    Strahler, E. A.
    Strom, R.
    Strotjohann, N. L.
    Sullivan, G. W.
    Taavola, H.
    Taboada, I.
    Tamburro, A.
    Tepe, A.
    Ter-Antonyan, S.
    Terliuk, A.
    Tesic, G.
    Tilav, S.
    Toale, P. A.
    Tobin, M. N.
    Tosi, D.
    Tselengidou, M.
    Unger, E.
    Usner, M.
    Vallecorsa, S.
    van Eijndhoven, N.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    van Santen, J.
    Vehring, M.
    Voge, M.
    Vraeghe, M.
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallraff, M.
    Weaver, Ch.
    Wellons, M.
    Wendt, C.
    Westerhoff, S.
    Whelan, B. J.
    Whitehorn, N.
    Wichary, C.
    Wiebe, K.
    Wiebusch, C. H.
    Williams, D. R.
    Wissing, H.
    Wolf, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wood, T. R.
    Woschnagg, K.
    Xu, D. L.
    Xu, X. W.
    Yanez, J. P.
    Yodh, G.
    Yoshida, S.
    Zarzhitsky, P.
    Ziemann, J.
    Zierke, S.
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data2015In: Physical Review D, ISSN 1550-7998, E-ISSN 1550-2368, Vol. 91, no 7, 072004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser IceCube instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10 and 100 GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The IceCube detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by Delta m(32)(2) = 2.72(-0.20)(+0.19) x 10(-3) eV(2) and sin(2)theta(23) = 0.53(-0.12)(+0.09) (normal mass ordering assumed). The results are compatible, and comparable in precision, to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  • 38. Aartsen, M. G.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Adams, J.
    Aguilar, J. A.
    Ahlers, M.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Altmann, D.
    Anderson, T.
    Arguelles, C.
    Arlen, T. C.
    Auffenberg, J.
    Bai, X.
    Barwick, S. W.
    Baum, V.
    Beatty, J. J.
    Tjus, J. Becker
    Becker, K. -H
    BenZvi, S.
    Berghaus, P.
    Berley, D.
    Bernardini, E.
    Bernhard, A.
    Besson, D. Z.
    Binder, G.
    Bindig, D.
    Bissok, M.
    Blaufuss, E.
    Blumenthal, J.
    Boersma, D. J.
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bos, F.
    Bose, D.
    Boeser, S.
    Botner, O.
    Brayeur, L.
    Bretz, H. -P
    Brown, A. M.
    Casey, J.
    Casier, M.
    Cheung, E.
    Chirkin, D.
    Christov, A.
    Christy, B.
    Clark, K.
    Classen, L.
    Cleverinann, F.
    Coenders, S.
    Cowen, D. F.
    Silva, A. H. Cruz
    Danninger, Matthias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Daughhetee, J.
    Davis, J. C.
    Day, M.
    de Andre, J. P. A. M.
    De Clercq, C.
    De Ridder, S.
    Desiati, P.
    de Vries, K. D.
    de With, M.
    DeYoung, T.
    Diaz-Velez, J. C.
    Dunkman, M.
    Eagan, R.
    Eberhardt, B.
    Eichmann, B.
    Eisch, J.
    Euler, S.
    Evenson, P. A.
    Fadiran, O.
    Fazely, A. R.
    Fedynitch, A.
    Feintzeig, J.
    Felde, J.
    Feusels, T.
    Filimonov, K.
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Fischer-Wasels, T.
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Franckowiak, A.
    Frantzen, K.
    Fuchs, T.
    Gaisser, T. K.
    Gaior, R.
    Gallagher, J.
    Gerhardt, L.
    Gier, D.
    Gladstone, L.
    Gluesenkamp, T.
    Goldschmidt, A.
    Golup, G.
    Gonzalez, J. G.
    Goodman, J. A.
    Gora, D.
    Grant, D.
    Gretskov, P.
    Groh, J. C.
    Gross, A.
    Ha, C.
    Haack, C.
    Ismail, A. Haj
    Hallen, P.
    Hallgren, A.
    Halzen, F.
    Hanson, K.
    Hebecker, D.
    Heereman, D.
    Heinen, D.
    Helbing, K.
    Hellauer, R.
    Hellwig, D.
    Hickford, S.
    Hill, G. C.
    Hoffman, K. D.
    Hoffmann, R.
    Homeier, A.
    Hoshina, K.
    Huang, F.
    Huelsnitz, W.
    Hulth, Per Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hussain, S.
    Ishihara, A.
    Jacobi, E.
    Jacobsen, J.
    Jagielski, K.
    Japaridze, G. S.
    Jero, K.
    Jlelati, O.
    Jurkovic, M.
    Kaminsky, B.
    Kappes, A.
    Karg, T.
    Karle, A.
    Kauer, M.
    Kelley, J. L.
    Kheirandish, A.
    Kiryluk, J.
    Klaes, J.
    Klein, S. R.
    Koehne, J. -H
    Kohnen, G.
    Kolanoski, H.
    Koob, A.
    Koepke, L.
    Kopper, C.
    Kopper, S.
    Koskinen, D. J.
    Kowalski, M.
    Kriesten, A.
    Krings, K.
    Kroll, G.
    Kroll, M.
    Kunnen, J.
    Kurahashi, N.
    Kuwabara, T.
    Labare, M.
    Larsen, D. T.
    Larson, M. J.
    Lesiak-Bzdak, M.
    Leuermann, M.
    Leute, J.
    Luenemann, J.
    Madsen, J.
    Maggi, G.
    Maruyama, R.
    Mase, K.
    Matis, H. S.
    Maunu, R.
    McNally, F.
    Meagher, K.
    Medici, M.
    Meli, A.
    Meures, T.
    Miarecki, S.
    Middell, E.
    Middlemas, E.
    Milke, N.
    Miller, J.
    Mohrmann, L.
    Montaruli, T.
    Morse, R.
    Nahnhauer, R.
    Naumann, U.
    Niederhausen, H.
    Nowicki, S. C.
    Nygren, D. R.
    Obertacke, A.
    Odrowski, S.
    Olivas, A.
    Omairat, A.
    O'Murchadha, A.
    Palczewski, T.
    Paul, L.
    Penek, Oe.
    Pepper, J. A.
    de los Heros, C. Perez
    Pfendner, C.
    Pieloth, D.
    Pinat, E.
    Posselt, J.
    Price, P. B.
    Przybylski, G. T.
    Puetz, J.
    Quinnan, M.
    Raedel, L.
    Rameez, M.
    Rawlins, K.
    Redl, P.
    Rees, I.
    Reimann, R.
    Relich, M.
    Resconi, E.
    Rhode, W.
    Richman, M.
    Riedel, B.
    Robertson, S.
    Rodrigues, Jp.
    Rongen, M.
    Rott, C.
    Ruhe, T.
    Ruzybayev, B.
    Ryckbosch, D.
    Saba, S. M.
    Sander, H. -G
    Sandroos, J.
    Santander, M.
    Sarkar, S.
    Schatto, K.
    Scheriau, F.
    Schmidt, T.
    Schmitz, M.
    Schoenen, S.
    Schoeneberg, S.
    Schoenwald, A.
    Schukraft, A.
    Schulte, L.
    Schulz, O.
    Seckel, D.
    Sestayo, Y.
    Seunarine, S.
    Shanidze, R.
    Smith, M. W. E.
    Soldin, D.
    Spiczak, G. M.
    Spiering, C.
    Stamatikos, M.
    Stanev, T.
    Stanisha, N. A.
    Stasik, A.
    Stezelberger, T.
    Stokstad, R. G.
    Stoessl, A.
    Strahler, E. A.
    Stroem, R.
    Strotjohann, N. L.
    Sullivan, G. W.
    Taavola, H.
    Taboada, I.
    Tamburro, A.
    Tepe, A.
    Ter-Antonyan, S.
    Terliuk, A.
    Tesic, G.
    Tilav, S.
    Toale, P. A.
    Tobin, M. N.
    Tosi, D.
    Tselengidou, M.
    Unger, E.
    Usner, M.
    Vallecorsa, S.
    van Eijndhoven, N.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    van Santen, J.
    Vehring, M.
    Voge, M.
    Vraeghe, M.
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallraff, M.
    Weaver, Ch.
    Wellons, M.
    Wendt, C.
    Westerhoff, S.
    Whelan, B. J.
    Whitehorn, N.
    Wichary, C.
    Wiebe, K.
    Wiebusch, C. H.
    Williams, D. R.
    Wissing, H.
    Wolf, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wood, T. R.
    Woschnagg, K.
    Xu, D. L.
    Xu, X. W.
    Yanez, J. P.
    Yodh, G.
    Yoshida, S.
    Zarzhitsky, P.
    Ziemann, J.
    Zierke, S.
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Searches for small-scale anisotropies from neutrino point sources with three years of IceCube data2015In: Astroparticle physics, ISSN 0927-6505, E-ISSN 1873-2852, Vol. 66, 39-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, IceCube found evidence for a diffuse signal of astrophysical neutrinos in an energy range of similar to 60 TeV to the PeV-scale [1]. The origin of those events, being a key to understanding the origin of cosmic rays, is still an unsolved question. So far, analyses have not succeeded to resolve the diffuse signal into point-like sources. Searches including a maximum-likelihood-ratio test, based on the reconstructed directions and energies of the detected down- and up-going neutrino candidates, were also performed on IceCube data leading to the exclusion of bright point sources. In this paper, we present two methods to search for faint neutrino point sources in three years of IceCube data, taken between 2008 and 2011. The first method is an autocorrelation test, applied separately to the northern and southern sky. The second method is a multipole analysis, which expands the measured data in the northern hemisphere into spherical harmonics and uses the resulting expansion coefficients to separate signal from background. With both methods, the results are consistent with the background expectation with a slightly more sparse spatial distribution, corresponding to an underfluctuation. Depending on the assumed number of sources, the resulting upper limit on the flux per source in the northern hemisphere for an E-2 energy spectrum ranges from similar to 1.5. 10(-8) GeV/cm(2) s(-1), in the case of one assumed source, to similar to 4. 10(-10) GeV/cm(2) s(-1), in the case of 3500 assumed sources.

  • 39.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Carlsson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    The genotoxic potency of glycidol established from micronucleus frequency and hemoglobin adduct levels in mice2017In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 100, 168-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycidol is a genotoxic animal carcinogen that has raised concern due to its presence in food, as glycidyl fatty acid esters. Here we investigated the genotoxicity of glycidol in BalbC mice (0-120 mg/kg) by monitoring the induction of micronuclei in peripheral blood as a marker of chromosomal damage. The scoring of the micronuclei was assessed by flow cytometry. In the treated mice, the internal dose of glycidol, expressed as area under the concentration-time curve, AUC (mol x L-1 x h; Mh), was measured by dihydroxypropyl adducts to hemoglobin (Hb). The study showed that glycidol induced linear dose dependent increases of Hb adducts (20 pmol/g Hb per mg/kg) and of micronuclei frequencies (12 parts per thousand per mMh). Compared to calculations based on administered dose, an improved dose-response relationship was observed when considering internal dose, achieved through the applied combination of sensitive techniques used for the scoring of micronuclei and AUC estimation of glycidol in the same mice. By comparing with earlier studies on micronuclei induction in mice exposed to ionizing radiation we estimated the radiation dose equivalent (rad-eq.) of glycidol to be ca 15 rad-eq./mMh.

  • 40.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vare, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Motwani, Hitesh V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jenssen, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions2016In: Mutation research. Genetic toxicology and environmental mutagenesis, ISSN 1383-5718, E-ISSN 1879-3592, Vol. 805, 38-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration x cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at ante of 0.08 +/- 0:01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5 rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study.

  • 41.
    Aasi, Parisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Organizational Culture and Structure Influence on Information Technology Governance2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nunes, Ivan
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hodosi, Georg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The impact of different organizational cultures on IT outsourcing relationship management2013In: International Journal of Innovation in the Digital Economy, ISSN 1947-8305, Vol. 4, no 2, 50-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization has affected the organizations in many aspects such as structure, architecture, internal/external strategies and sourcing management. Outsourcing is one of the recent business strategies used to provide IT needs via external agents. The relationship between the service buyer and provider companies is a constituent playing a significant role in IT outsourcing success or failure. This research has a focus on the influence of organizational culture of buyer companies on the specific factors of trust, cooperation, communication and commitment in their relationship with the IT service provider. Two explorative case studies are done in global companies using ITO which revealed the presence of organizational culture effect. Particularly, being innovative, having open discussion as an organizational culture and looking for extending contracts with providers as a strategy, appeared as the major difference between the two cases organizational culture; which influences the studied factors of ITO relationship in this research.

  • 43.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nunes, Ivan
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hodosi, Georg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Does Organizational Culture Matter in IT Outsourcing Relationships?2015In: Proceedings of the 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-48), IEEE Computer Society, 2015, 4691-4699 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Han, Shengnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Culture Influence on IT Governance: What We Have Learned?2014In: International Journal of IT - Business Alignment and Governance, ISSN 1947-9611, E-ISSN 1947-962X, Vol. 5, 34-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Han, Shengnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Role of Culture in IT Governance2014In: Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2014): AMCIS 2014, Proceedings, AIS eLibrary , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Han, Shengnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Influence of Culture on IT Governance: A Literature Review2014In: 2014 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) / [ed] Sprague, R. H., IEEE Computer Society, 2014, 4436-4445 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT governance is crucial for managers to regulate the decision rights and responsibilities that the desired IT behaviors and business objectives are aligned with each other. Additionally, culture in national, organizational or group level can play a role in IT governance and this role is rarely explored in academic research. This paper provides a literature review investigating the impact of culture on IT governance. It is aimed to find the linkage between these two concepts and to promote this area for future research. The literature review was done systematically and the findings are categorized by using an IT governance framework which includes three main components: structures, processes and relational mechanisms. The results indicate there is an influence from national and organizational culture on IT governance, especially on relational mechanisms. However, the number of studies is very few and there is still a lack of knowledge on how culture can influence IT governance.

  • 47.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Han, Shengnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Influence of Organizational Culture on IT Governance Performance: Case of The IT Department in a Large Swedish Company2016In: Proceedings of the 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences / [ed] Tung X. Bui, Ralph H. Sprague, Jr., IEEE Computer Society, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IT governance is one of the top concerns of organizations today seeking to gain value from their IT investments and create competitive advantage. Organizational culture on the other hand is one of the various factors influencing IT governance performance. However there is not much research conducted to understand this topic deeply. This research thus, is exploring the influence of organizational culture on four IT governance performance outcomes through a case study in IT department of a large Swedish company. The results provide evidence that organizational culture is influencing IT governance performance. Specifically the current clan culture orientation of the IT department has led to a successful IT governance performance in cost-effective use of IT. Furthermore adhocracy as the preferred culture is identified to influence IT governance in effective use of IT for growth which is not so successful with the current clan culture.

  • 48.
    Aasi, Parisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Leidner, Dorothy
    IT Organizational Structure Relationship with IT Governance Performance: Case of a Public Organization2017In: Information Technology Governance in Public Organizations: Theory and Practice / [ed] Lazar Rusu, Gianluigi Viscusi, Springer, 2017, no 0, 229-252 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information Technology (IT) is widely used in organizations and managers continue to struggle with how to govern IT. IT governance concerns the decision rights and division of responsibilities to achieve value from IT investments. Any IT governance approach is incorporated into a given organizational structure. However in the particular context of public organizations, there is little research on IT organizational structure relationship with IT governance performance. In this research, a case study is done in a public organization to find out how suitable is the organizational structure of the IT department is in relation with the IT governance performance. The results reveal that the IT department organizational structure needs to suit the IT governance performance desired outcomes. In this case, operating as a public organization has actuated the organization to focus on IT governance outcome of effective use of IT for growth. This together with the IT governance archetypes of this public organization for different IT decisions led the IT department leaders to adopt a matrix organizational structure.

  • 49.
    Aatela, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Tvillingskap, identitetsutveckling och delad eller gemensam skolgång.: - Resonemang bland föräldrar, lärare och tvillingar2009Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 50.
    Abarca, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Japanese Studies.
    Förebyggandet av självmord: En komparativ studie mellan Sverige och Japan2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
1234567 1 - 50 of 89469
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