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  • 1. Abdelhai, Rehab
    et al.
    Yassin, Sahar
    Ahmad, Mohamad F.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    An e-learning reproductive health module to support improved student learning and interaction: a prospective interventional study at a medical school in Egypt2012In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 12, 11- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Public Health (PH) course at the medical college of Cairo University is based on traditional lectures. Large enrollment limits students' discussions and interactions with instructors. Aim: Evaluate students' learning outcomes as measured by improved knowledge acquisition and opinions of redesigning the Reproductive Health (RH) section of the PH course into e-learning and assessing e-course utilization. Methods: This prospective interventional study started with development of an e-learning course covering the RH section, with visual and interactive emphasis, to satisfy students' diverse learning styles. Two student groups participated in this study. The first group received traditional lecturing, while the second volunteered to enroll in the e-learning course, taking online course quizzes. Both groups answered knowledge and course evaluation questionnaires and were invited to group discussions. Additionally, the first group answered another questionnaire about reasons for non-participation. Results: Students participating in the e-learning course showed significantly better results, than those receiving traditional tutoring. Students who originally shunned the e-course expressed eagerness to access the course before the end of the academic year. Overall, students using the redesigned e-course reported better learning experiences. Conclusions: An online course with interactivities and interaction, can overcome many educational drawbacks of large enrolment classes, enhance student's learning and complement pit-falls of large enrollment traditional tutoring.

  • 2.
    Back, Jon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designing Activity and Creating Experience: On People’s Play in Public places2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the design of play in public places; this can mean both pervasive games and other freer play activities. In these activities (as well as in many other game activities) the same game can spur many different ways to play it, and the same activity can be experienced differently by different players, and even differently on different occasions for the same player. An activity such as playing must be observed as a whole. The surrounding cul- ture, player preconceptions and the emergent mood within the group will affect the experience.

    By analysing previous frameworks, and using own design examples, a three level design framework is developed, functioning as a lens towards understanding the design of playful activities. The framework focuses on the player perspective, offering game design as an invitation and encouragement to engage in certain activities. The framework distinguishes between design at three levels:

    1. Designed construct (e.g. artefacts and rules)
    2. Activity
    3. Experiences

    But it remains to be understood why people engage in the activities that lead to playful experiences. What encourages playful engagement? And why do people want to play one game, and not another?

    This question can be split into two parts:

    • Engagement: starting to be interested in the activity
    • Commitment: actually caring for the experience

    This issue is identified in the thesis, and examples show how convoluted this problem is, in particular in pervasive game settings. Challenges are pre- sented for future work.

  • 3.
    Cakici, Baki
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bylund, Markus
    SICS Swedish ICT.
    Changing Behaviour to Save Energy: ICT-Based Surveillance for a Low-Carbon Economy in the Seventh Framework ProgrammeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Cramer, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rost, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bentley, Frank
    Motorola Mobility.
    Guest editorial Preface on Special Issue: An Introduction to Research in the Large2011In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, no Special issueArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution of mobile applications has been greatly simplified by mobile app stores and markets. Both lone developers and large research and development teams can now relatively easily reach wide audiences. In addition, people’s mobile phones can now run advanced applications and are equipped with sensors that used to be available only in custom research hardware. This provides researchers with a huge opportunity to gather research data from a large public. Evaluation and research methods have to be adapted to this new context. However, an overview of successful strategies and ways to overcome the methodological challenges inherent to wide deployment in a research context is not yet available. A workshop was organized on this topic and this special issue to help address these topics. This introduction provides an overview of strategies and opportunities in ‘research in the large’, while providing an introduction to challenges in ethics and validity as well.

  • 5.
    Ekanayake, Hiran B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Colombo School of Computing.
    Validating User Engagement and Effectiveness of Training Simulations: A mixed-methods approach informed by embodied cognition and psychophysiological measures2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation-based training has gained widespread attention recently as a response to drawbacks associated with traditional training approaches, such as high training costs (instructors, equipment, etc.), high risks (e.g. pilot training), and ethical issues (e.g. medical training), as well as a lack of availability of certain training environments (e.g. space exploration). Apart from their target training domains, many of aspects of simulations differ, such as their degree of physical realism (fidelity), scenarios (e.g. story), and pedagogical aspects (e.g. after-action reviews and collaborative learning). Among those aspects, designers have mostly focused on developing high-fidelity simulations with the expectation of increasing the effectiveness of training. However, some authors suggest that the above belief is a myth as researchers have failed to identify a linear relationship between the (physical) fidelity and training effectiveness of simulations.  Most researchers have therefore evaluated the correspondence between the behaviours of trainees in both real world and simulated contexts, however, the existing methods of simulation validation using behavioural measures have a number of drawbacks, such as the fact that they do not address certain complex phenomena of skills acquisition.

    Bridging the above knowledge gap, this research reports on empirical investigations using an improved methodology for validating training simulations. This research includes an investigation of the user experience of trainees, with respect to the acceptance of virtual scenarios provoking a similar psychophysiological response as in real world scenarios, and the training potential of simulations with respect to the positive transfer of training from a simulator to real world operational contexts. The most prominent features of the proposed methodology include the use of psychophysiological measures in addition to traditional behavioural measures and the use of natural (quasi-) experiments. Moreover, its conceptual framework was influenced by contemporary theories in cognitive science (e.g. constructivism and embodied cognition). The results of this research have several important theoretical and methodological implications, involving, for example, the dependency of the effectiveness of simulations on the perceived realism of trainees, which is more embodied than has been predicted by previous researchers, and the requirement of several different types/levels of adaptive training experience, depending on the type of trainee.

  • 6.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools for Designing Mobile Interaction with the Physical Environment in Outdoor Lessons2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies are increasingly being used to support students in outdoor learning activities. For instance, in a growing number of research projects, smartphones and positioning technologies are being used to support students in exploring the natural environment. However, previous research has identified challenges with the introduction of mobile technology into outdoor lessons. One fundamental challenge is that interaction with mobile technology in outdoor lessons may distract students from interacting with the physical environment. In this thesis this challenge is approached from the perspective of human-computer interaction, guided by the following research question: How can we design, evaluate, and reflect on mobile technology for interacting with the physical environment in outdoor lessons? The thesis presents four design cases on outdoor geometry and biology lessons, which act as probes for developing conceptual design tools. The design cases were developed through a concept-driven design approach and evaluated on field tests with primary school students. Future workshop and Interaction analysis were the main methods used. The results of the field tests suggest that mobile technology needs to be designed to orientate students in their interaction with the physical environment. In line with the concept-driven design approach, the thesis proposes three design tools. The design tools proposed are: Design guidelines that are specific enough for guiding the design of mobile technology for outdoor lessons, a Design model for designing and evaluating mobile technology for outdoor lessons, and Design concepts for reflecting on the placement of mobile technology in outdoor lessons. The design tools are proposed as tools for researchers and designers to take the challenge of distraction into account in designing mobile technology for outdoor lessons.

  • 7.
    Guerrero Razuri, Javier Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Decisional-Emotional Support System for a Synthetic Agent: Influence of Emotions in Decision-Making Toward the Participation of Automata in Society2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotion influences our actions, and this means that emotion has subjective decision value. Emotions, properly interpreted and understood, of those affected by decisions provide feedback to actions and, as such, serve as a basis for decisions. Accordingly, "affective computing" represents a wide range of technological opportunities toward the implementation of emotions to improve human-computer interaction, which also includes insights across a range of contexts of computational sciences into how we can design computer systems to communicate and recognize the emotional states provided by humans. Today, emotional systems such as software-only agents and embodied robots seem to improve every day at managing large volumes of information, and they remain emotionally incapable to read our feelings and react according to them. From a computational viewpoint, technology has made significant steps in determining how an emotional behavior model could be built; such a model is intended to be used for the purpose of intelligent assistance and support to humans. Human emotions are engines that allow people to generate useful responses to the current situation, taking into account the emotional states of others. Recovering the emotional cues emanating from the natural behavior of humans such as facial expressions and bodily kinetics could help to develop systems that allow recognition, interpretation, processing, simulation, and basing decisions on human emotions. Currently, there is a need to create emotional systems able to develop an emotional bond with users, reacting emotionally to encountered situations with the ability to help, assisting users to make their daily life easier. Handling emotions and their influence on decisions can improve the human-machine communication with a wider vision. The present thesis strives to provide an emotional architecture applicable for an agent, based on a group of decision-making models influenced by external emotional information provided by humans, acquired through a group of classification techniques from machine learning algorithms. The system can form positive bonds with the people it encounters when proceeding according to their emotional behavior. The agent embodied in the emotional architecture will interact with a user, facilitating their adoption in application areas such as caregiving to provide emotional support to the elderly. The agent's architecture uses an adversarial structure based on an Adversarial Risk Analysis framework with a decision analytic flavor that includes models forecasting a human's behavior and their impact on the surrounding environment. The agent perceives its environment and the actions performed by an individual, which constitute the resources needed to execute the agent's decision during the interaction. The agent's decision that is carried out from the adversarial structure is also affected by the information of emotional states provided by a classifiers-ensemble system, giving rise to a "decision with emotional connotation" included in the group of affective decisions. The performance of different well-known classifiers was compared in order to select the best result and build the ensemble system, based on feature selection methods that were introduced to predict the emotion. These methods are based on facial expression, bodily gestures, and speech, with satisfactory accuracy long before the final system.

  • 8.
    Lindvall, LInus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, , Computer and Systems Science.
    Pettersson Jalming, Nina
    Stockholm University, , .
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania CV AB, , .
    Westin, Nils Åke Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    How to not run into a wall: A comparative experiment of movement in virtual reality2017In: Nordic Ergonomic Society Annual Meeting, Lund University, Sweden , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    McGregor, Moira Drummond
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    C. Tang, John
    Microsoft Research, , .
    More to Meetings: Challenges in Using Speech-Based Technology to Support Meetings2017In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, ACM Publications , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal assistants using a command-dialogue model of speech recognition, such as Siri and Cortana, have become increasingly powerful and popular for individual use. In this paper we explore whether similar techniques could be used to create a speech-based agent system which, in a group meeting setting, would similarly monitor spoken dialogue, pro-actively detect useful actions, and carry out those actions without specific commands being spoken. Using a low-fi technical probe, we investigated how such a system might perform in the collaborative work setting and how users might respond to it. We recorded and transcribed a varied set of nine meetings from which we generated simulated lists of automated ‘action items’, which we then asked the meeting participants to review retrospectively. The low rankings given on these discovered items are suggestive of the difficulty in applying personal assistant technology to the group setting, and we document the issues emerging from the study. Through observations, we explored the nature of meetings and the challenges they present for speech agents.

  • 10.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. MobileLife@Stockholm University.
    Live Mobile Video Interaction: Inventing and investigating technology, formats and applications2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The convergence of inexpensive video-enabled mobile phones, high-speed mobile data networks and ubiquitous sensing devices opens up a new design space called “live mobile video interaction”. It gives rise to a new genre of applications concerning live mobile video production, which can be seen as an instance of the said space. In this work we are particularly interested to explore potential technical challenges and opportunities presented by “live mobile video interaction”. We started our investigation by studying two existing prototypes from the said genre i.e. the Instant Broadcasting System (IBS) and the Mobile Vision Mixer (MVM). We studied their applicability for amateur users of collaborative mobile video production tools and the problems caused by inherent communication delays in the Internet. We acquired initial user feedback and conducted technical tests on Instant Broadcasting System (IBS) and Mobile Vision Mixer (MVM). Our results indicate that lack of synchronisation among video streams causes problems for directors in such systems that were not present in professional systems. We also identified two distinct video production modes depending on visual access of the director to the event that is being filmed. Based on our study we proposed technical design suggestions and indications on how to solve the synchronisation problems in respective mixing modes. We also proposed an algorithm for frame-rate exclusive synchronisation management of live streams in a collaborative mobile production environment. We further probed the design space using the research through design method, which resulted in a fully functional prototype system called “Livenature” that would incite an emotional connection that exists between people and the places they cherish. Further investigation of Livenature allowed us to produce detailed studies about experiential and technical aspects of the system, thus revealing phenomenological and technical dimensions of the design space.

  • 11.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zoric, Goranka
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Frame Rate Exclusive Sync Management of Live Video Streams in Collaborative Mobile Production Environment2014In: Proceedings of Workshop on Mobile Video Delivery, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, nr 2- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss synchronization problem in an emerging type of multimedia applications, called live mobile collaborative video production systems. The mobile character of the production system allows a director to be present at the site where he/she can see the event directly as well as through the mixer display. In such a situation production of a consistent broadcast is sensitive to delay and asynchrony of video streams in the mixer console. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for this situation called "frame rate exclusive sync manager", which draws on existing reactive source control synchronization techniques. It relies solely on frame-rate control and maintains synchronization between live video streams while ensuring minimal delay by dynamically adapting the frame-rate of the camera feeds based on synchronization offset and network bandwidth health. The algorithm is evaluated by simulation which indicates algorithm's capability of achieving increased synchronization among live streams.

  • 12.
    Rost, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mobility is the Message: Experiments with Mobile Media Sharing2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores new mobile media sharing applications by building, deploying, and studying their use. While we share media in many different ways both on the web and on mobile phones, there are few ways of sharing media with people physically near us. Studied were three designed and built systems: Push!Music, Columbus, and Portrait Catalog, as well as a fourth commercially available system – Foursquare. This thesis offers four contributions: First, it explores the design space of co-present media sharing of four test systems. Second, through user studies of these systems it reports on how these come to be used. Third, it explores new ways of conducting trials as the technical mobile landscape has changed. Last, we look at how the technical solutions demonstrate different lines of thinking from how similar solutions might look today.

    Through a Human-Computer Interaction methodology of design, build, and study, we look at systems through the eyes of embodied interaction and examine how the systems come to be in use. Using Goffman’s understanding of social order, we see how these mobile media sharing systems allow people to actively present themselves through these media. In turn, using McLuhan’s way of understanding media, we reflect on how these new systems enable a new type of medium distinct from the web centric media, and how this relates directly to mobility.

    While media sharing is something that takes place everywhere in western society, it is still tied to the way media is shared through computers. Although often mobile, they do not consider the mobile settings. The systems in this thesis treat mobility as an opportunity for design. It is still left to see how this mobile media sharing will come to present itself in people’s everyday life, and when it does, how we will come to understand it and how it will transform society as a medium distinct from those before. This thesis gives a glimpse at what this future will look like.

  • 13.
    Rost, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cramer, Henriette
    Ahmet, Zeynep
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    Teens Using Portrait Catalog: An Evaluation Of a Mobile Photo Sharing SystemIn: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a mobile photo sharing system and a mass scale evaluation at a local youth festival. The system prevents pictures received from being forwarded and aims at adding meaning to photos shared through such a system making them collectable. The study setup was at a large youth festival where 400 teenagers had their photo taken and given the opportunity to have the application installed on their own phones. Although we achieved a large user base, the actual use was never triggered to reach critical mass. We report on the experience of the users, and also report on how teenagers in our study mostly share photos by looking at each other’s phone screens.

  • 14.
    Rázuri, Javier G.
    et al.
    Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain .
    Esteban, Pablo G.
    Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain .
    Ríos Insua, David
    Royal Academy of Sciences, Madrid, Spain .
    An Adversarial Risk Analysis Model for an Emotional Based Decision Agent2011In: The 2nd International Workshop on Decision Making with Multiple Imperfect Decision Makers, Institute of Information Theory and Automation , 2011, 1-6 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce a model that describes the decision making process of an autonomoussynthetic agent which interacts with another agent and is influencedby affective mechanisms. This model would reproduce patterns similar to humansand regulate the behavior of agents providing them with some kind of emotionalintelligence and improving interaction experience. We sketch the implementationof our model with an edutainment robot.

  • 15. Salgado-Montejo, Alejandro
    et al.
    Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Alvarado, Jorge A.
    Arboleda, Juan Camilo
    Suarez, Daniel R.
    Spence, Charles
    Drawing sounds: representing tones and chords spatially2016In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 234, no 12, 3509-3522 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the crossmodal correspondences has revealed that seemingly unrelated perceptual information can be matched across the senses in a manner that is consistent across individuals. An interesting extension of this line of research is to study how sensory information biases action. In the present study, we investigated whether different sounds (i.e. tones and piano chords) would bias participants' hand movements in a free movement task. Right-handed participants were instructed to move a computer mouse in order to represent three tones and two chords. They also had to rate each sound in terms of three visual analogue scales (slow-fast, unpleasant-pleasant, and weak-strong). The results demonstrate that tones and chords influence hand movements, with higher-(lower-)pitched sounds giving rise to a significant bias towards upper (lower) locations in space. These results are discussed in terms of the literature on forward models, embodied cognition, crossmodal correspondences, and mental imagery. Potential applications sports and rehabilitation are discussed briefly.

  • 16.
    Strååt, Björn Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Verhagen, Harko Henricus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using User Created Game Reviews for Sentiment Analysis: A Method for Researching User Attitudes2017In: Games-Human Interaction (GHITALY 2017), CEUR Workshop Proceedings , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a method for gathering and evaluating user attitudes towards previously released video games. All user reviews from two video game franchise were collected. The most frequently mentioned words of the games were derived from this dataset through word frequency analysis. The words, called “aspects” were then further analyzed through a manual aspect based sentiment analysis. The final analysis show that the rating of user review to a high degree correlate with the sentiment of the aspect in question, if the data set is large enough. This knowledge is valuable for a developer who wishes to learn more about previous games success or failure factors

  • 17. Svensson, Martin
    Defining, designing and evaluating social navigation2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Thies, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Complex Problems in Healthcare: By Applying a Free-Flowing Design Practice2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare in Sweden is in need of a transformation. The increase of chronic conditions poses a great challenge to the organisational structure of healthcare, which still largely remains based on acute, rather than chronic care. Development in the healthcare realm is commonly conducted in fragmented processes and from the professions', rather than the patients', perspective.

    A new type of design methodology has in recent years entered the field of healthcare development and innovation. It has progressively been used to enable the reorganisation of the healthcare system itself rather than solely developing artefacts, IT-systems or services within it. This thesis focuses on problems that can be described as open, complex, dynamic, networked, or wicked. The following research questions are investigated:

       I.     How can designers' competence contribute to healthcare innovation?

     II.     How can designers support the identification of complex problems in healthcare?

    Empirical data were collected during two healthcare innovation projects in which the author took an active role as both designer and researcher. The research work was based on qualitative data that were gathered using ethnographic methodology (i.e., interviews, participant observation and field notes). The data were analysed using open coding principles and activity theory.

    The results highlighted the valuable role of free-flowing design practice, supporting a thorough understanding of complex problems. The free-flowing design practice entails that the problem space and the solution space co-evolve. These spaces expand iteratively, continuously affecting each other while redefining problems in search of solutions that aim at radical innovation and not merely incremental ameliorations.

  • 19.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Experiencing Liveness of a Cherished Place in the Home2015In: Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for TV and Online Video, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, 3-12 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liveness, as discussed in HCI and in media studies, focuses on an intriguing and beloved experiential quality that can influence new forms of video applications. We suggest a shift from accounts of liveness in "events" to liveness in ambient media for home décor by designing a system called TransLive that exploits the "magic" of mediatizing the "now" at a distant and cherished place. We present an interview study including four families, who experienced the system for two weeks each in a concept apartment setting. It shows how immediacy and unpredictability provide compelling experiences. Authenticity and engagement, which are previously considered as inherent qualities in live media, instead occur in the context of use. Finally, the experience of transcendence triggered by slow and continuous video streams open up a new design space of liveness. Thus, not only do we take inspiration from liveness theory, but we also need to redefine it.

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