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  • 1. Abdelhai, Rehab
    et al.
    Yassin, Sahar
    Ahmad, Mohamad F.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    An e-learning reproductive health module to support improved student learning and interaction: a prospective interventional study at a medical school in Egypt2012In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 12, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Public Health (PH) course at the medical college of Cairo University is based on traditional lectures. Large enrollment limits students' discussions and interactions with instructors. Aim: Evaluate students' learning outcomes as measured by improved knowledge acquisition and opinions of redesigning the Reproductive Health (RH) section of the PH course into e-learning and assessing e-course utilization. Methods: This prospective interventional study started with development of an e-learning course covering the RH section, with visual and interactive emphasis, to satisfy students' diverse learning styles. Two student groups participated in this study. The first group received traditional lecturing, while the second volunteered to enroll in the e-learning course, taking online course quizzes. Both groups answered knowledge and course evaluation questionnaires and were invited to group discussions. Additionally, the first group answered another questionnaire about reasons for non-participation. Results: Students participating in the e-learning course showed significantly better results, than those receiving traditional tutoring. Students who originally shunned the e-course expressed eagerness to access the course before the end of the academic year. Overall, students using the redesigned e-course reported better learning experiences. Conclusions: An online course with interactivities and interaction, can overcome many educational drawbacks of large enrolment classes, enhance student's learning and complement pit-falls of large enrollment traditional tutoring.

  • 2. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Effektiv simulatorträning: Slutrapport projekt Effektiv flygträning och utbildning 2015-20172017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of what constitutes effective flight training and education is complex and can be approached in different ways. The research project "Effective fighter pilot training and education" (2015-2017) has scientifically and methodically worked on integrating pedagogical models and practical experience in flight training, taking into account organizational structures. Furthermore, systematic design work of visual support for debriefings has been conducted. This report integrates project activities, research questions and project results in a coherent description. Additional support (both tools and methods) is needed to analyze complex scenarios and measures that can pinpoint the performance of the pilot or group of pilots. Based on complex measures, two visualizations that provide an overview of the pilot's shooting moment and threat picture have been developed. Both visualizations, Missile launch and Threat range, have been evaluated in conjunction with Swedish air force fighter pilots and are presented in the report. Furthermore, the project have successfully used machine learning to categorize pilots' communication with the aim of assessing efficiency, and to identify any deficiencies through visualizations of the results. Educational models, visualizations, as well as empirical studies of simulator facilities also provide a basis for a discussion of what characterizes efficient simulator facilities and effective simulation training. Studies of the LVC (Live, Virtual & Constructive) concept, which means that training in one and the same scenario is done with real aircraft and pilots, pilots in flight simulators and artificial agents, have been conducted. Additionally, the project has introduced the concept of "LVC in everyday training", a vision of seamless integration of real aircraft and pilots in simulated aircraft. The activities of the project have largely been carried out in cooperation and in relation to the IMTR II (International Mission Training Research II) cooperation agreement with U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Within the collaboration, the project has contributed to a demonstration of LVC capabilities where FLSC were the only European participant. The project intends to continue this collaboration and focus on LVC to further approach the vision of LVC as an integral part of regular training. The report recommends a future research agenda.

  • 3. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Utforskande av träningsvärde för Live och Virtual: Avrapportering projekt "LVC för effektiv flygträning" år 20182018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring training value for Live and Virtual

    This report describes work done to explore and adapt LVC, a training concept that integrates real aircraft (Live), manned flight simulators (Virtual) and artificial agents (Constructive), into a Swedish context for the purpose of streamlining training and evaluation of performance and ability in complex and distributed systems. Particularly focused in this text is the training needs and training value, defined as the increased training value that pilots, in airplanes, and manned simulators, receive when participating in training involving real aircraft, simulators and artificial agents. To study training needs and training value of LVC training, three main activities were carried out: (1) a literature review of scientific studies about LVC and training effect. Results show that research and evaluation of the LVC concept have largely focused on technical aspects of LVC, rather than training value, (2) workshops for exploring added value at LVC training. Results show that the L-entity receives the best training value because pilots in airplanes can experience and train decision making in larger and more realistic scenarios under physical stress and unexpected events, and (3) conducting an experimental study (Wizard-of-Oz) at FLSC (Flygvapnets luftstridssimuleringscenter) where pilots in simulators in a fictitious LVC-test flew against what they thought were pilots in airplanes. Pilots who participated in the study stated that they thought it was a true LVC-test and acted accordingly. In debriefing, the pilots reported that pilots in simulators cannot get more out of LVC training than they can get out of regular simulator training. Results from the study further point to the importance of the design of training scenarios, so that both pilots in airplanes and simulators can get a good training effect. The report also provides for cooperation and information exchange with international partners. The report ends with a description of the project's focus 2019.

  • 4.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Väätäjä, Heli
    Understanding animals: A critical challenge in ACI2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 148-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a qualitative content analysis of visual-verbal social media posts, where ordinary dog owners pretend to be their canine, to identify meaningful facets in their dogs' life-worlds, e.g. pleasures of human-dog relation, dog-dog relations, food etc. We use this knowledge to inform design of "quantified pets". The study targets a general problem in Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI), i.e. to understand animals when designing "for" them, although lacking a common language. Several approaches, e.g. ethnography and participatory design, have been appropriated from HCI without exhausting the issue. We argue for a methodological creativity and pluralism by suggesting an additional approach drawing on "kinesthetic empathy". It implies to understand animals by empathizing with their bodily movements over time and decoding the realities of their life-worlds. This, and other related approaches, has inspired animal researchers to conduct more or less radical participant observations during extensive duration to understand the perspective of the other. We suggest that dog owners whom share their lives with their dogs already possess a similar understanding as these experts, and thus uphold important experiences of canine life that could be used to understand individual dogs and inspire design.

  • 5.
    Back, Jon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designing Activity and Creating Experience: On People’s Play in Public places2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the design of play in public places; this can mean both pervasive games and other freer play activities. In these activities (as well as in many other game activities) the same game can spur many different ways to play it, and the same activity can be experienced differently by different players, and even differently on different occasions for the same player. An activity such as playing must be observed as a whole. The surrounding cul- ture, player preconceptions and the emergent mood within the group will affect the experience.

    By analysing previous frameworks, and using own design examples, a three level design framework is developed, functioning as a lens towards understanding the design of playful activities. The framework focuses on the player perspective, offering game design as an invitation and encouragement to engage in certain activities. The framework distinguishes between design at three levels:

    1. Designed construct (e.g. artefacts and rules)
    2. Activity
    3. Experiences

    But it remains to be understood why people engage in the activities that lead to playful experiences. What encourages playful engagement? And why do people want to play one game, and not another?

    This question can be split into two parts:

    • Engagement: starting to be interested in the activity
    • Commitment: actually caring for the experience

    This issue is identified in the thesis, and examples show how convoluted this problem is, in particular in pervasive game settings. Challenges are pre- sented for future work.

  • 6.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    What Is Pleasure?2018In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe, Andrew Monk, Springer, 2018, 2, p. 47-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Laurier, Eric
    The Trouble with Autopilots: Assisted and Autonomous Driving on the Social Road2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 416-429Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As self-driving cars have grown in sophistication and ability, they have been deployed on the road in both localised tests and as regular private vehicles. In this paper we draw upon publicly available videos of autonomous and assisted driving (specifically the Tesla autopilot and Google self-driving car) to explore how their drivers and the drivers of other cars interact with, and make sense of, the actions of these cars. Our findings provide an early perspective on human interaction with new forms of driving involving assisted-car drivers, autonomous vehicles and other road users. The focus is on social interaction on the road, and how drivers communicate through, and interpret, the movement of cars. We provide suggestions toward increasing the transparency of autopilots' actions for both their driver and other drivers.

  • 8.
    Cakici, Baki
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bylund, Markus
    SICS Swedish ICT.
    Changing Behaviour to Save Energy: ICT-Based Surveillance for a Low-Carbon Economy in the Seventh Framework ProgrammeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jahnke, Isa
    Damsa, Crina
    Nussbaum, Miguel
    Säljö, Roger
    Emergent Practices and Material Conditions in Tablet-mediated Collaborative Learning and Teaching2017In: Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL: 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) 2017, Volume 2 / [ed] Brian K. Smith, Marcela Borge, Emma Mercier, Kyu Yon Lim, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2017, p. 905-908Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way in which digital technologies take part and contribute to configuring teaching and collaborative learning practices has become a timely research matter in our field. Current studies in the CSCL field, and particularly on the use of tablets in education, draw attention to how everyday educational practices are entangled with contemporary technologies and, how these technologies shape in turn such practices, in schools and higher education. This half-day workshop aims specifically at accounting for emergent practices in tablet-mediated collaborative learning and teaching, with a particularly focus on the material conditions that constitute such practices. The workshop invites researchers, designers and practitioners to contribute and engage with in-depth analyses of the use of tablets in everyday teaching and learning, in schools and higher education contexts. Furthermore, the workshop intends to trigger and facilitate participants to generate/propose conceptual and methodological analytical tools for examining the material conditions of tablet-mediated collaborative learning and teaching practices. The outcomes of the workshop will consist of (1) a repertoire of (identified) emergent practices bounded to the use of tablets in schools and higher education, reported by the participants, (2) a set of conceptual and analytical tools for the study of material conditions of CSCL practices and (3) a network bringing together researchers, practitioners and designers to set up a research agenda and initiate a consortium including the organisation of a special issue in an International journal.

  • 10. Collins-Thompson, Kevyn
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hauff, Claudia
    Search as Learning: Report from Dagstuhl Seminar 170922017In: Dagstuhl Reports, E-ISSN 2192-5283, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the program and the results of Dagstuhl Seminar 17092 "Search as Learning", which brought together 26 researchers from diverse research backgrounds. The motivation for the seminar stems from the fact that modern Web search engines are largely engineered and optimized to fulfill lookup tasks instead of complex search tasks. The latter though are an essential component of information discovery and learning. The 3-day seminar started with four perspective talks, providing four different views on the topic of search as learning: interactive information retrieval (IR), psychology, education and system-oriented IR. The remainder of the seminar centered around breakout groups leading to new views on the challenges and issues in search as learning, interspersed with research spotlight talks.

  • 11.
    Cramer, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rost, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bentley, Frank
    Motorola Mobility.
    Guest editorial Preface on Special Issue: An Introduction to Research in the Large2011In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918, no Special issueArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution of mobile applications has been greatly simplified by mobile app stores and markets. Both lone developers and large research and development teams can now relatively easily reach wide audiences. In addition, people’s mobile phones can now run advanced applications and are equipped with sensors that used to be available only in custom research hardware. This provides researchers with a huge opportunity to gather research data from a large public. Evaluation and research methods have to be adapted to this new context. However, an overview of successful strategies and ways to overcome the methodological challenges inherent to wide deployment in a research context is not yet available. A workshop was organized on this topic and this special issue to help address these topics. This introduction provides an overview of strategies and opportunities in ‘research in the large’, while providing an introduction to challenges in ethics and validity as well.

  • 12.
    Ekanayake, Hiran B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Colombo School of Computing.
    Validating User Engagement and Effectiveness of Training Simulations: A mixed-methods approach informed by embodied cognition and psychophysiological measures2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation-based training has gained widespread attention recently as a response to drawbacks associated with traditional training approaches, such as high training costs (instructors, equipment, etc.), high risks (e.g. pilot training), and ethical issues (e.g. medical training), as well as a lack of availability of certain training environments (e.g. space exploration). Apart from their target training domains, many of aspects of simulations differ, such as their degree of physical realism (fidelity), scenarios (e.g. story), and pedagogical aspects (e.g. after-action reviews and collaborative learning). Among those aspects, designers have mostly focused on developing high-fidelity simulations with the expectation of increasing the effectiveness of training. However, some authors suggest that the above belief is a myth as researchers have failed to identify a linear relationship between the (physical) fidelity and training effectiveness of simulations.  Most researchers have therefore evaluated the correspondence between the behaviours of trainees in both real world and simulated contexts, however, the existing methods of simulation validation using behavioural measures have a number of drawbacks, such as the fact that they do not address certain complex phenomena of skills acquisition.

    Bridging the above knowledge gap, this research reports on empirical investigations using an improved methodology for validating training simulations. This research includes an investigation of the user experience of trainees, with respect to the acceptance of virtual scenarios provoking a similar psychophysiological response as in real world scenarios, and the training potential of simulations with respect to the positive transfer of training from a simulator to real world operational contexts. The most prominent features of the proposed methodology include the use of psychophysiological measures in addition to traditional behavioural measures and the use of natural (quasi-) experiments. Moreover, its conceptual framework was influenced by contemporary theories in cognitive science (e.g. constructivism and embodied cognition). The results of this research have several important theoretical and methodological implications, involving, for example, the dependency of the effectiveness of simulations on the perceived realism of trainees, which is more embodied than has been predicted by previous researchers, and the requirement of several different types/levels of adaptive training experience, depending on the type of trainee.

  • 13.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools for Designing Mobile Interaction with the Physical Environment in Outdoor Lessons2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies are increasingly being used to support students in outdoor learning activities. For instance, in a growing number of research projects, smartphones and positioning technologies are being used to support students in exploring the natural environment. However, previous research has identified challenges with the introduction of mobile technology into outdoor lessons. One fundamental challenge is that interaction with mobile technology in outdoor lessons may distract students from interacting with the physical environment. In this thesis this challenge is approached from the perspective of human-computer interaction, guided by the following research question: How can we design, evaluate, and reflect on mobile technology for interacting with the physical environment in outdoor lessons? The thesis presents four design cases on outdoor geometry and biology lessons, which act as probes for developing conceptual design tools. The design cases were developed through a concept-driven design approach and evaluated on field tests with primary school students. Future workshop and Interaction analysis were the main methods used. The results of the field tests suggest that mobile technology needs to be designed to orientate students in their interaction with the physical environment. In line with the concept-driven design approach, the thesis proposes three design tools. The design tools proposed are: Design guidelines that are specific enough for guiding the design of mobile technology for outdoor lessons, a Design model for designing and evaluating mobile technology for outdoor lessons, and Design concepts for reflecting on the placement of mobile technology in outdoor lessons. The design tools are proposed as tools for researchers and designers to take the challenge of distraction into account in designing mobile technology for outdoor lessons.

  • 14. Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Gustavsson, Filip
    Larsson, Gustav
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Takt: The Wearable Timepiece That Enables Sensory Perception of Time2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 223-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that people with ADHD have difficulties adjusting to the normative structure of time. Through an iterative participatory design process with students diagnosed with ADHD, different conceptions and representations of time were explored to create a design that better suits their needs. Based on the findings that visual resources are used to understand the duration of time and the lack of an internal clock to help tell the passage of time, we created Takt. Takt relies on touch and vision to enable users to tell the passage of time using their senses rather than relying on the cognition required to read the information on a clock.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    HeartBeats – A Speculative Proposal For Ritualization of Digital Objects2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 218-222Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose HeartBeats, a speculative design proposal that embodies digital immortality. Based on previous research and user studies, HeartBeats addresses a growing need for design to support ritualization of digital data in the context of bereavement. Our aim is to stimulate discussion about digital immortality and afterlife. By challenging perceived characteristics and qualities of inherited data, we hope to open design spaces to better enable ritualization of digital objects in bereavement.

  • 16. Fabiano Pinatti de Carvalho, Aparecido
    et al.
    Rossitto, ChiaraStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Lampinen, AiriStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Luigina, CiolfiGray, Breda
    Proceedings of the ECSCW 2017 Workshop on “Nomadic Cultures Beyond Work Practices”2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this issue we explore the conceptual, analytical and design challenges inherent in the notion of “Nomadic Culture”. The papers included highlight how research on mobility has contributed to the CSCW community, while pointing to unsolved problems, future challenges and research agendas. We see this collection of papers as developing a more holistic perspective on nomadic culture, and connecting this scholarship with recent research on sharing and exchange platforms as sites of work. This intervention contributes to an understanding of nomadic culture by providing a more contemporary perspective on the social and cultural aspects of workplace sites and co-working practices.

  • 17.
    Faraon, Montathar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Co-creating democracy: Conceptualizing co-creative media to facilitate democratic engagement in society2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-based information and communication technology (ICT) have increasingly been used to facilitate and support democratic engagement in society. A growing body of research has demonstrated that the Internet and, in particular, social media have given citizens the opportunity to participate, interact, network, collaborate, and mobilize themselves within communities. While these media have broadened the means of exercising citizenship in many forms of participatory democracy, the technological prerequisites exist to go beyond the standard uses of social media (e.g., social networking, entertainment) and towards proactive and co-creative democratic engagement. Such engagement includes, but is not limited to, participatory activities for democratic purposes. Further, some researchers have argued that representative democracy is in decline and has several limitations related to citizens' trust in politicians and engagement with representative institutions. There is a recognition among scholars to infuse representative democracy with participatory bottom-up processes by employing ICT in an attempt to bridge these limitations. In order to further facilitate and support participatory as well as co-creative processes, this thesis elaborates a concept of co-creative media.

    The process of this work was guided by the following question: How can co-creative media be theoretically anchored and conceptualized in order to facilitate and support citizen engagement within democratic processes? A concept-driven design research approach was adopted to address this research question, and this resulted in five interconnected articles. Firstly, based on the results from each article, four design guidelines were formulated to further guide the design of co-creative media for democratic engagement. These design guidelines may support future participatory design processes in which stakeholders collectively contribute to the development and evaluation of co-creative media. The guidelines constitute a resource that stakeholders may use to develop adaptations of co-creative media for the purposes of facilitating democratic engagement. Secondly, the results from each article were fed forward into the concept-driven research process as theoretical and empirical insights, which were used to inform and elaborate the main contribution of this thesis, namely the concept of co-creative media.

    The concept of co-creative media in its form outlined by this thesis seeks to broaden citizens’ democratic engagement by means of creating virtual spaces in which new ideas, initiatives, knowledge, solutions, and digital tools could emerge. The implications of co-creative media could be to create, develop, and strengthen partnerships between communities and local services, extend digital skills in society through community-engaged practitioners, and propagate as well as coordinate large-scale co-creative practices.

  • 18. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    McMillan, DonaldStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Girouard, AudreyTholander, JakobStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to ACM TEI'18, the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions, hosted at KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, in Stockholm, Sweden, from the 18th to the 21st of March 2018. This is TEI's first visit to Scandinavia! The TEI conference series is dedicated to issues of human-computer interaction, novel tools and technologies, interactive art, and user experience. This year's conference focuses on the concepts of physical and material interaction through the lens of Post-Digital Design. The digital has become mundane, inseparable from our everyday experiences. In post-digital design we see a turn to vintage materials and craftsmanship, but also to real world circumstances of human bodies on a global scale. Old media and natural materials have regained interest for interaction designers, and traditional practices are being cherished in new ways as part of digital experiences. Designing for the post-digital does not mean blindly embracing nostalgia or turning away from technology - it means embracing a process of design that equalizes the status of digital, analogue, electronic, mechanical and tactile, and that brings focus to form, meaning and function, rather than technicalities. The intimate size of this single-track conference provides a unique forum for exchanging ideas and presenting innovative work through talks, interactive exhibits, demos, hands-on studios, posters, art installations and performances. TEI'18 hosts a four-day program, starting on Sunday March 18th with the Graduate Student Consortium and a series of Studios that engage participants in the concrete making of novel interfaces and interactions. The main program starts with an opening keynote on Monday March 19th, followed by a series of talks on shape changing materials, followed by a hands-on session showcasing Work in Progress demonstrations as well as exemplars from full papers accepted to the proceedings. The Tuesday starts with the remainder of the demonstrations and the Student Design Challenge, this year with a theme of common place, mundane technologies from the future. Paper presentations on technology for children, and Virtual and Augmented reality precede a second session of demos from full paper submissions. The evening of the second day finds the conference in Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern, one of the largest cultural institutions in Northern Europe, for a curated exhibition of art installations and live performances exploring the post-digital. A total of 25 works will be presented over the evening, which is also open to the public. On Wednesday, March 21st, sessions present talks on evaluation and community, followed by a closing panel session.

  • 19.
    Guerrero Razuri, Javier Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Decisional-Emotional Support System for a Synthetic Agent: Influence of Emotions in Decision-Making Toward the Participation of Automata in Society2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotion influences our actions, and this means that emotion has subjective decision value. Emotions, properly interpreted and understood, of those affected by decisions provide feedback to actions and, as such, serve as a basis for decisions. Accordingly, "affective computing" represents a wide range of technological opportunities toward the implementation of emotions to improve human-computer interaction, which also includes insights across a range of contexts of computational sciences into how we can design computer systems to communicate and recognize the emotional states provided by humans. Today, emotional systems such as software-only agents and embodied robots seem to improve every day at managing large volumes of information, and they remain emotionally incapable to read our feelings and react according to them. From a computational viewpoint, technology has made significant steps in determining how an emotional behavior model could be built; such a model is intended to be used for the purpose of intelligent assistance and support to humans. Human emotions are engines that allow people to generate useful responses to the current situation, taking into account the emotional states of others. Recovering the emotional cues emanating from the natural behavior of humans such as facial expressions and bodily kinetics could help to develop systems that allow recognition, interpretation, processing, simulation, and basing decisions on human emotions. Currently, there is a need to create emotional systems able to develop an emotional bond with users, reacting emotionally to encountered situations with the ability to help, assisting users to make their daily life easier. Handling emotions and their influence on decisions can improve the human-machine communication with a wider vision. The present thesis strives to provide an emotional architecture applicable for an agent, based on a group of decision-making models influenced by external emotional information provided by humans, acquired through a group of classification techniques from machine learning algorithms. The system can form positive bonds with the people it encounters when proceeding according to their emotional behavior. The agent embodied in the emotional architecture will interact with a user, facilitating their adoption in application areas such as caregiving to provide emotional support to the elderly. The agent's architecture uses an adversarial structure based on an Adversarial Risk Analysis framework with a decision analytic flavor that includes models forecasting a human's behavior and their impact on the surrounding environment. The agent perceives its environment and the actions performed by an individual, which constitute the resources needed to execute the agent's decision during the interaction. The agent's decision that is carried out from the adversarial structure is also affected by the information of emotional states provided by a classifiers-ensemble system, giving rise to a "decision with emotional connotation" included in the group of affective decisions. The performance of different well-known classifiers was compared in order to select the best result and build the ensemble system, based on feature selection methods that were introduced to predict the emotion. These methods are based on facial expression, bodily gestures, and speech, with satisfactory accuracy long before the final system.

  • 20. Gusev, Dmitri A.
    et al.
    Eschbach, Reiner
    Westin, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Yong, Justin
    Motion Sickness Related Aspects of Inclusion of Color Deficient Observers in Virtual Reality2017In: Virtual Reality: Recent Advances for Health and Wellbeing / [ed] Wendy A. Powell, Paul M. Sharkey, Albert A. Rizzo, Joav Merrick, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21. Haapoja, Jesse
    et al.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    'Datafied' reading: framing behavioral data and algorithmic news recommendations2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 125-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are increasing concerns about how people discover news online and how algorithmic systems affect those discoveries. We investigate how individuals made sense of behavioral data and algorithmic recommendations in the context of a system that transformed their online reading activities into a new data source. We apply Goffman's frame analysis to a qualitative study of Scoopinion, a collaborative news recommender system that used tracked reading time to recommend articles from whitelisted websites. Based upon ten user interviews and one designer interview, we describe 1) the process through which reading was framed as a `datafied' activity and 2) how behavioral data was interpreted as socially meaningful and communicative, even in the absence of overtly social system features, producing what we term `implicit sociality'. We conclude with a discussion of how our findings about Scoopinion and its users speak to similar issues with more popular and more complex algorithmic systems.

  • 22. Hans Christian, Arnseth
    et al.
    Hanghøj, Thorkild
    Thomas, Duus Henriksen
    Morten, Misfeldt
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Selander, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Introduction: Scandinavian Perspectives2018In: Games and Education: Games and Education / [ed] Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg, Staffan Selander, Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, no 1, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23. Helms, Karey
    et al.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sahlgren, Magnus
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design Methods to Investigate User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence2018In: 2018 AAAI Spring Symposium Series, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence , 2018, p. 394-398Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with the challenges of designing ‘implicit interaction’, systems (or system features) in which actions are not actively guided or chosen by users but instead come from inference driven system activity. We discuss the difficulty of designing for such systems and outline three Research through Design approaches we have engaged with - first, creating a design workbook for implicit interaction, second, a workshop on designing with data that subverted the usual relationship with data, and lastly, an exploration of how a computer science notion, “leaky abstraction”, could be in turn misinterpreted to imagine new system uses and activities. Together these design activities outline some inventive new ways of designing User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence.

  • 24. Holten Møller, Naja L.
    et al.
    Shklovski, Irina
    Silberman, M. Six
    Dombrowski, Lynn
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Constructive-Critical Approach to the Changing Workplace and its Technologies2017In: Proceedings of 15th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Panels, Posters and Demos, European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of technical systems into work practices can result in shifting the balance of power in terms of what is visible and what is hidden (Suchman 1994; Star & Strauss 1999) and in fundamentally changing the nature of work itself (Bannon 1994). Sometimes these changes can have unpredictable and even adverse effects on the stakeholders involved (Clement & Wagner 1995). ECSCW as a venue has not shied away from pointing out that there is politics to sociomaterial processes we observe and study (Bannon & Bødker 1997; Bjørn and Balka 2007). As work computerization begins to involve the digitization of work practices, however, more thorny political questions emerge. The workplace changes when the spheres of private life and work are blurred as sensors are attached to the employee in the workplace for tracking movement (Gorm & Shklovski 2016; Møller et al. 2017), when the workplace as a fixed physical location is dissolved as in the case of turning homes into “pop-up co-working places” (Rossitto et al. 2017), in the “sharing economy” (Zade & O’Neil 2016), in online labor platforms such as Amazon Mechanical Turk (Irani and Silberman 2013), or when workplace data-collection is management- rather than worker-centric resulting in employee exploitation (Dombrowski 2017). The challenge for CSCW research is to study the changing workplace and affect the nature of collaborative work with the aim of improving the design of computational systems, while attending to and perhaps improving the conditions for work.

  • 25.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Every Little Bit Makes Little Difference: The Paradox within SHCI2018In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the paradox / [ed] Mike Hazas, Lisa P. Nathan, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wehn, Uta
    From Assumptions to Artifacts: Unfolding e-participation within Multi-level Governance2017In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 57-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of technological innovation within the context of governance processes is often embraced with rhetorical enthusiasm and seen as a de facto enabler for democratic decision‑making. Underpinning this enthusiasm is the leap of faith made from transparency to trust, from complexity to coherence. The belief that using new tools for e‑participation can generate dramatic transformation in public sector redesign and result in societal benefits is heralded as a shift towards public innovation. It is precisely this belief that we examine in this paper. We start our investigation by providing a conceptualization of what e‑participation means within the context of multi‑level governance. By using a cross case comparison of two European research projects, we provide an empirical base upon which we can examine the process of e‑participation and the implications of digital e‑participation tools for various levels of governance and public accountability. Furthermore we provide an interdisciplinary contribution in understanding the gap between what technological innovation makes possible and the acceptance or openness on the part of decision makers to embrace citizen input within policy processes.

  • 27.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zhang, Yanqing
    Fashionable services for wearables2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 88-88Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28. Karahalios, Karrie
    et al.
    Monroy-Hernández, Andrés
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    Editors' Message2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 2, no CSCW, article id 16Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to this issue of the Proceedings of the ACM on Human Computer Interaction, the second to focus on the contributions from the research community Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW).

    This journal model allows for rapid publication of papers shortly after acceptance as well as enabling automatic indexing services, such as Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) indexing. The aim is to increase the visibility of the work of authors in this community, and allow for better comparability with fields outside of Computer Science.

    This issue contains papers accepted over two iterations of the review process. The call for papers for this second issue, with an initial deadline in Spring 2018, attracted 722 submissions, from all around the world. After the first round of reviewing, 326 (45,2%) papers were invited to the Revise and Resubmit phase. The program committee worked hard over August 2018 to arrive at final decisions, with an online editorial committee meeting held to allow for collective deliberation. In the end, 184 papers (25,5%) were accepted.

    For some of those papers, authors received further shepherding and guidance by a senior committee member. This shows the commitment of the CSCW community to not only ensure high quality contributions, but also to educate and enable authors to write and present their best work for this community. This issue exists because of the dedicated volunteer effort of 132 senior editorial committee members who served as Associate Chairs (ACs), and 837 external expert reviewers to ensure high quality and insightful reviews for all papers in both rounds.

  • 29. Karahalios, Karrie
    et al.
    Monroy-Hernández, AndrésLampinen, AiriStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This issue contains papers accepted over two iterations of the review process. The call for papers for this second issue, with an initial deadline in Spring 2018, attracted 722 submissions, from all around the world. After the first round of reviewing, 326 (45,2%) papers were invited to the Revise and Resubmit phase. The program committee worked hard over August 2018 to arrive at final decisions, with an online editorial committee meeting held to allow for collective deliberation. In the end, 184 papers (25,5%) were accepted.

    For some of those papers, authors received further shepherding and guidance by a senior committee member. This shows the commitment of the CSCW community to not only ensure high quality contributions, but also to educate and enable authors to write and present their best work for this community. This issue exists because of the dedicated volunteer effort of 132 senior editorial committee members who served as Associate Chairs (ACs), and 837 external expert reviewers to ensure high quality and insightful reviews for all papers in both rounds.

  • 30.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Deltagande design av undervisning2018In: Att bli lärare / [ed] Eva Insulander, Staffan Selander, Stockholm: Liber , 2018, p. 278-283Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designmönster och mönsterspråk: Lärare designar tillsammans2017In: Didaktik i omvandlingens tid: text, representation, design / [ed] Eva Insulander, Susanne Kjällander, Fredrik Lindstrand, Anna Åkerfeldt, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, no 0, p. 139-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Teachers’ Collaborative Pattern Language Design2018In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers in their practice make choices grounded in their teaching experience resulting in what could be labelled design solutions. An identified problem is that these design solutions stay at the level of individual solutions and do not reach the teaching community. The aim of this article is to study how teachers´ design solutions can be systematically captured, organized, and communicated through design patterns and a pattern language. Building on participatory design we have together with teachers used and adapted the concept of design patterns and pattern languages as a way of capturing, documenting and communicating design problems and solutions to these. This structured approach led to the teachers seeing connections and interrelations between problems, and that a solution to one of these also helped in alleviating other problems. The formulation of design patterns and proposed pattern languages thus gave the teachers an overview of their practice that would otherwise be difficult to obtain. The content of the design patterns show what problems that are dealt with by the teachers through their design solutions. The structure of the final pattern language shows how problems and solutions are connected to larger goals for the teachers, such as improving the communication with students, as well as the importance of sharing good examples between colleagues.

  • 33. Koskinen, Ilpo
    et al.
    Lim, Youn-kyungCerratto-Pargman, TeresaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Chow, KennyOdom, William
    Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are pleased to welcome Designing Interactive Systems DIS 2018 to Hong Kong. DIS 2018 is the first of its kind in two ways. It is in Asia for the first time. It is also in an art and design school for the first time. The theme of the conference is Design and Diversity. The theme reflects a classic design theme - and also a foundational distinction in philosophy - of universals and particulars. Should we, as designers, follow Silicon Valley in its quest for products that engage everyone on the planet, or the architect Glenn Murcutt's conviction that he can only build in places he knows so well that his designs can be outstanding? The underlying logic of this question divides designers and design disciplines and emerges in every design process. This theme operated as a guiding tool for selecting our four keynotes, professors Jodi Forlizzi, Kun-pyo Lee, Phoebe Sengers and Erik Stolterman. During their years in design, they have lived through its diversities. We were happy that they accepted the challenge to share their experiences and thoughts about diversity to the benefit of our community. The theme was also our tool for directing the DIS community into the future. A few years from now, we hope, we will start to see answers to the challenges our keynotes are posing to us. The nucleus of the conference organization were two chairs and three technical chairs. This small group invited sixteen Subcommittee Chairs, three Pictorials chairs, and two chairs each for Workshops, Provocations and Work-in-Progress, Doctoral Consortium, and Demos. These chairs recruited 100 Associate Chairs, who recruited 1818 reviewers. Our review and decision schedule was brutal, but the organization worked through it efficiently, always with humor, and with collegial respect. DIS 2018 received 645 submissions: 405 for full papers and notes submissions; 71 for pictorials; 23 for workshops submissions; 107 for Provocations and Work-in-Progress (out of these, 19 were Provocations); 20 for Doctoral Consortium Submissions; and 19 for Demos. Acceptance rates were: 23% for papers and notes, 24% Pictorials, 55% for Workshops, 73% for Demos, 53% for PWiPs, and 50% for Doctoral Consortium. All this work led into a highly competitive conference between 9-13 June. June 9-10 were reserved for Workshops and Doctoral Consortium, and June 11-13 for 28 paper sessions. Pictorials are not in separate sessions; they are treated the same way as Full Papers. The 11th of June became an Experience Night of Demos, PWiPs, and a small design exhibition, which illuminated interaction design in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta. As extra, we organized a postconference trip to a few technology companies in Shenzhen, China.

  • 34.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Market Design for HCI: Successes and Failures of Peer-to-Peer Exchange Platforms2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 4331-4343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores an HCI approach to designing markets, with a primary focus on peer-to peer exchange platforms. We draw on recent work in economics that has documented how markets function, how they can be evaluated, and what can be done to fix them when they fail. We introduce five key concepts from market design: thickness, congestion, stability, safety, and repugnance. These lend HCI an analytic vocabulary for understanding why markets may succeed or struggle. Building on prior empirical work, we apply these concepts to compare two well-known network hospitality platforms, Couchsurfing and Airbnb. As a second illustrative case, we use market design to shed light on the challenges experienced by smaller-scale peer-to-peer marketplaces for lending, renting, and selling physical goods. To conclude, we discuss how this kind of analysis can make conceptual, evaluative, and generative contributions to the study and design of exchange platforms and other socio-technical systems.

  • 35.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lutz, Christoph
    Newlands, Gemma
    Light, Ann
    Immorlica, Nicole
    Power Struggles in the Digital Economy: Platforms, Workers, and Markets2018In: CSCW '18 Companion of the 2018 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 417-423Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop addresses the changing nature of work and the important role of exchange platforms as both intermediaries and managers. It aims to bring together interdisciplinary and critical scholars working on the power dynamics of digitally mediated labor. By doing so, the workshop provides a forum for discussing current and future research opportunities on the digital economy, including the sharing economy, the platform economy, the gig economy, and other adjacent framings. Of particular interest to this workshop is the intersection between worker and provider subjectivities and the roles platforms take in managing work through algorithms and software. Our one-day workshop accommodates up to 20 participants.

  • 36.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Comber, Rob
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Member-Owned Alternatives: Exploring Participatory Forms of Organising with Cooperatives2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 2, no CSCW, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperatives are member-owned organisations, run for the common benefit of their members. While cooperatives are a longstanding way of organising, they have received little attention in CSCW. In this paper, through interviews with 26 individuals from 24 different cooperatives, our focus is an exploratory inquiry on how cooperatives could expand thinking into what future economies can look like and the part technologies may play in them. We discuss (1) the work to make the co-op work, that is, the special effort involved in managing an enterprise in a democratic and inclusive way, (2) the multiple purposes that cooperatives can serve for their members, well beyond financial benefit, and (3) ICT usage within cooperatives as a site of tension and dialogue. We conclude by discussing the meaning and measures of success in alternative economies, and lessons learned for CSCW scholarship on civic and societal organisations.

  • 37.
    Landwehr Sydow, Sophie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jonsson, Martin
    "It's a Bomb!" – Material Literacy and Narratives of Making2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 121-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

  • 38. Li, Xiangdong A.
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lou, Xiaolong
    Geng, Weidong
    Peng, Ren
    Design and Evaluation of Cross-Objects User Interface for Whiteboard Interaction2017In: Distributed, Ambient and Pervasive Interactions: Proceedings / [ed] Norbert Streitz, Panos Markopoulos, Springer, 2017, p. 180-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whiteboard has long been an important tool for education and communication, and nowadays it embraces display functions and other interactive features such as pen pointing and selecting of digital contents. Despite the enhanced interactivity, it is often time- and cost-consuming to implement specific apparatus for different whiteboard interactions. Therefore, we aimed at incorporating physical-world objects (e.g. Lego Rubik’s cubes) as the cross-objects user interface for multiple whiteboard interaction tasks without incurring heavy development work. The user interface utilised electromagnetic technique to extract electromechanical signals and recognised normal objects, thus extended the generality. To further understand effectiveness of the user interface, we implemented a low-fidelity prototype and conducted within-subject evaluation. The results showed the cross-objects user interface was natural, responsive, and easy of learning as the conventional whiteboard. Moreover, the user interface outperformed over the conventional one in the perspectives of configuration efficiency and versatility of multiple interaction tasks. Given these findings, practical implications for future tangible user interface design for whiteboard interactions are discussed.

  • 39. Lindvall, Linus
    et al.
    Pettersson Jalming, Nina
    Krupenia, Stas
    Westin, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    How not to run into a wall: A comparative experiment of Movement in Virtual Reality2017In: NES 2017: Conference Proceedings: Joy at Work / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé, Hajnalka Bodnar, Nordic Ergonomics and Human Factors Society (NES) , 2017, p. 354-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent technical developments have resulted in the increased use of Virtual Reality and Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) for entertainment and industrial purposes (Bengtson, Borsos, & Krupenia, 2017). A persistent problem associated with the use of HMDs for VR is that when moving within a virtual environment, the user can experience motion sickness and disorientation resulting in reduced ease of use or efficiency. The purpose of the current research was to establish which movement-based design principle(s) is/are best suited for a virtual environment. Three movement techniques were implemented and tested; a fading teleport, a drag/floating movement, and a hybrid concept. Of interest were motion sickness, disorientation, ease of use, and efficiency. Results indicated that the fading teleport technique best supported ease of use and also reduced disorientation. Further investigation into the teleportation technique and how it can be further improved is suggested.

  • 40. Lou, Xianglong
    et al.
    Peng, Ren
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Li, Xiangdong A.
    Effects of User’s Hand Orientation and Spatial Movements on Free Hand Interactions with Large Displays2018In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In motion-sensing interaction with large displays through bare hands, we can observe that users alternate their hands and move their bodies frequently. What cause such actions and how these actions affect free hand interaction results are less systematically investigated. To address this gap in knowledge, we conducted studies on Pointer-Acceleration (PA)-based free hand interactions of target selection and found that (1) users made more frequent hand alternations when selecting small targets with large movement amplitudes, as in such cases users were not only affected by observable arm fatigue, but were also motivated to switch hands for higher selection accuracy and convenience; (2) hand alternation led to the hand orientation effects: target selection on display areas at the operating hand’s side was more efficient and accurate than that at the opposite side; (3) large movement amplitudes on the user interface increased users’ physical movements in front of the large display, which harmed selection efficiency; (4) selection of small targets led to a closer interaction distance, while large movement amplitudes led to a larger interaction distance; and (5) selection results were affected by interaction distances, as users gained high efficiency, but low accuracy at a large distance and low efficiency, but high accuracy at a close distance. Given these results, this article discusses practical implications for applying PA-based free hand interaction techniques and designing related user interfaces on large displays.

  • 41.
    McGregor, Moira
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tang, John C.
    More to Meetings: Challenges in Using Speech-Based Technology to Support Meetings2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 2208-2220Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal assistants using a command-dialogue model of speech recognition, such as Siri and Cortana, have become increasingly powerful and popular for individual use. In this paper we explore whether similar techniques could be used to create a speech-based agent system which, in a group meeting setting, would similarly monitor spoken dialogue, pro-actively detect useful actions, and carry out those actions without specific commands being spoken. Using a low-fi technical probe, we investigated how such a system might perform in the collaborative work setting and how users might respond to it. We recorded and transcribed a varied set of nine meetings from which we generated simulated lists of automated ‘action items’, which we then asked the meeting participants to review retrospectively. The low rankings given on these discovered items are suggestive of the difficulty in applying personal assistant technology to the group setting, and we document the issues emerging from the study. Through observations, we explored the nature of meetings and the challenges they present for speech agents.

  • 42.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Connecting Citizens: Designing for Data Collection and Dissemination in the Smart City2017In: Internet Science: Proceedings / [ed] Ioannis Kompatsiaris, Jonathan Cave, Anna Satsiou, Georg Carle, Antonella Passan, iEfstratios Kontopoulos, Sotiris Diplaris, Donald McMillan, Springer, 2017, p. 119-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents two case studies of citizen data collection and dissemination applications, developed for or by three different local authorities in Northern Europe. These case studies highlight the challenges in meeting the goals of Open Data, of involving citizens as sources of information, and of engendering and maintaining trust as a service provider all at the same time. The challenge of making data open can be seen as at odds with protecting the privacy and safety of citizens when it is sourced directly or indirectly from their actions. Encouraging citizens to collect, curate, and submit data can create misguided expectations of influence over the processes of local government, and disillusionment where action or feedback are not forthcoming. A local authority is trusted to provide information that is verified and for which it is accountable. Balancing this with goal of disseminating the results of citizen sourced data collection activities can result in frustration for developers, users, and local authority employees. In response to these issues this paper presents the following four design opportunities: probabilistic and personalised representations of data, making accountable the use of collected data, respecting the boundaries of data, and designing for the graceful degradation of resources.

  • 43.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Implicit Interaction Through Machine Learning: Challenges in Design, Accountability, and Privacy2017In: Internet Science: Proceedings / [ed] Ioannis Kompatsiaris, Jonathan Cave, Anna Satsiou, Georg Carle, Antonella Passani, Efstratios Kontopoulos, Sotiris Diplaris, Donald McMillan, Springer, 2017, p. 352-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implicit Interaction takes advantage of the rise of predictive algorithms, trained on our behaviour over weeks, months and years, and employs them to streamline our interactions with devices from smartphones to Internet connected appliances. Implicit Interaction provides users the advantage of systems that learn from their actions, while giving them the feedback and controls necessary to both understand and influence system behaviour without having to rely on an application for every connected device. This is an active area of research and as such presents challenges for interaction design due, in part, to the use of user-facing machine learning algorithms. This paper discusses the challenges posed by designing in accountability for system actions and predictions, the privacy concerns raised by both the sensing necessary to power these predictions and in how the predictions and systems actions themselves can expose behavioural patterns, and the challenges inherent in designing for the reality of machine learning techniques rather than the hype.

  • 44.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Smartwatch in Multi-device Interaction2017In: Design, User Experience, and Usability: Designing Pleasurable Experiences: Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Aaron Marcus, Wentao Wang, Springer, 2017, p. 275-287Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wearable devices are typically not used on their own. Indeed, many are sold specifically as companion devices to mobile phones. Here, we take a close look at smartwatch use in its natural multi-device context, building on a corpus of 1009 in vivo smartwatch use incidents recorded with twelve participants over 168 h. We examine closely four exemplar clips, exploring glances for information during other tasks, maintenance tasks that allow the allocation of spare attention, the smartwatch in conversation around media consumption, and the physical constraints of its embodied use on the wrist alongside other devices. Our study sheds light on current smartwatch use practices alongside devices with more established use scenarios, and on how the smartwatch changes and disrupts those practices.

  • 45.
    McMillan, Donald
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hoggan, Eve
    Pizza, Stefania
    Situating Wearables: Smartwatch Use in Context2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 3582-3594Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on 168 hours of video recordings of smartwatch use, this paper studies how context influences smartwatch use. We explore the effects of the presence of others, activity, location and time of day on 1,009 instances of use. Watch interaction is significantly shorter when in conversation than when alone. Activity also influences watch use with significantly longer use while eating than when socialising or performing domestic tasks. One surprising finding is that length of use is similar at home and work. We note that usage peaks around lunchtime, with an average of 5.3 watch uses per hour throughout a day. We supplement these findings with qualitative analysis of the videos, focusing on how use is modified by the presence of others, and the lack of impact of watch glances on conversation. Watch use is clearly a context-sensitive activity and in discussion we explore how smartwatches could be designed taking this into consideration.

  • 46. Mozelius, Peter
    et al.
    Fagerström, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Söderquist, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Motivating Factors and Tangential Learning for Knowledge Acquisition in Educational Games2017In: Electronic Journal of e-Learning, ISSN 1479-4403, E-ISSN 1479-4403, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 343-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game-based learning has been a strong emerging trend in the 21st century, but several research studies on game-based learning reports that the educational potential of games has not been fully realised. Many educational games do not combine learning outcomes with entertaining gameplay. At the same time as there is a tendency to digitise and personalise education by the use of digital games, there still exists a lack of knowledge about efficient educational game design. To identify design factors that are important for players' learning motivation this study has analysed three popular entertainment games that were selected for their educational values. The aim of the study is to explore, analyse and discuss, if and how motivating factors and intrinsic integration of knowledge in educational games might be related to players' perceived knowledge acquisition. Test players with experience of the selected digital games were recruited from online gaming forums where a questionnaire also was used to collect data. Lepper's and Malone's set of heuristics for intrinsic motivation in interactive learning environments were used in a combination with Habgood's and Ainsworth's theory of intrinsic integration to examine the relationship between these factors in the educational games. Beside the direct acquisition of knowledge from gaming there was also an analysis of the concept of tangential learning. Results from a t-test showed that tangential learning was significantly more important for two of the tested games. Correlation analysis revealed several relationships between factors, where intrinsic integration was pointed out as particularly interesting for knowledge acquisition and tangential learning. Results showed weak or no relationships for Lepper and Malone factors, but with some tendencies for control, imagination and competition.

  • 47.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. MobileLife@Stockholm University.
    Live Mobile Video Interaction: Inventing and investigating technology, formats and applications2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The convergence of inexpensive video-enabled mobile phones, high-speed mobile data networks and ubiquitous sensing devices opens up a new design space called “live mobile video interaction”. It gives rise to a new genre of applications concerning live mobile video production, which can be seen as an instance of the said space. In this work we are particularly interested to explore potential technical challenges and opportunities presented by “live mobile video interaction”. We started our investigation by studying two existing prototypes from the said genre i.e. the Instant Broadcasting System (IBS) and the Mobile Vision Mixer (MVM). We studied their applicability for amateur users of collaborative mobile video production tools and the problems caused by inherent communication delays in the Internet. We acquired initial user feedback and conducted technical tests on Instant Broadcasting System (IBS) and Mobile Vision Mixer (MVM). Our results indicate that lack of synchronisation among video streams causes problems for directors in such systems that were not present in professional systems. We also identified two distinct video production modes depending on visual access of the director to the event that is being filmed. Based on our study we proposed technical design suggestions and indications on how to solve the synchronisation problems in respective mixing modes. We also proposed an algorithm for frame-rate exclusive synchronisation management of live streams in a collaborative mobile production environment. We further probed the design space using the research through design method, which resulted in a fully functional prototype system called “Livenature” that would incite an emotional connection that exists between people and the places they cherish. Further investigation of Livenature allowed us to produce detailed studies about experiential and technical aspects of the system, thus revealing phenomenological and technical dimensions of the design space.

  • 48.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zoric, Goranka
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Frame Rate Exclusive Sync Management of Live Video Streams in Collaborative Mobile Production Environment2014In: Proceedings of Workshop on Mobile Video Delivery, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 2-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss synchronization problem in an emerging type of multimedia applications, called live mobile collaborative video production systems. The mobile character of the production system allows a director to be present at the site where he/she can see the event directly as well as through the mixer display. In such a situation production of a consistent broadcast is sensitive to delay and asynchrony of video streams in the mixer console. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for this situation called "frame rate exclusive sync manager", which draws on existing reactive source control synchronization techniques. It relies solely on frame-rate control and maintains synchronization between live video streams while ensuring minimal delay by dynamically adapting the frame-rate of the camera feeds based on synchronization offset and network bandwidth health. The algorithm is evaluated by simulation which indicates algorithm's capability of achieving increased synchronization among live streams.

  • 49. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Community-Based Innovation among Elite Orienteers2017In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 87-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied a form of community innovation within the sport of orienteering, which in the Nordic countries consist of a closely knit group with a strong sense of community. This study shows how the processes for developing new technologies are driven by a strong sense of idealism, with little or no commercial motivation. Thus, this represents a kind of community development and sharing with a number of unique characteristics. While the community is central to participants' endeavours of developing their systems, the participants are not representative of the typical member. On the contrary, they are examples of a minority that put in significant efforts of contributing to the larger group. What we argue is unique about the case we have presented is that the technology development starts out from a few number of highly motivated individuals that through limited collaboration with others builds technologies that get extensive proliferation and use within the community.

  • 50.
    Parviainen, Emmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lagerström, Ellinor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Composting as Interior Design: Encouraging Sustainability throughout a Participatory Design Process2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems Pages, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 167-171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Could recycling become an interesting activity instead of a compulsive requirement? 20 participants in Stockholm, Sweden participated in a study to determine why recycling is still a problem on an individual scale. The designers of the project were the users themselves with facilitators guiding them throughout the five phases of the participatory design project; contextual inquiry, future workshop, low-fi and hi-fi prototyping, and evaluation. The final design is an indoor compost that helps the user see the effects of recycling on a more personal level. We argue for the importance of creating a deeper connection between the design and the user by showing how an artefact can achieve the desired behaviour when associated with emotions. In this case, recycling can bring a user closer to nature.

12 1 - 50 of 88
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