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  • 1.
    Arnardottir, K. B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kyriienko, O.
    Shelykh, I. A.
    Hall effect for indirect excitons in an inhomogeneous magnetic field2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 86, no 24, p. 245311-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the effect of an inhomogeneous out-of-plane magnetic field on the behavior of two-dimensional (2D) spatially indirect excitons. Due to the difference of the magnetic field acting on electrons and holes, the total Lorentz force affecting the center of mass motion of an indirect exciton appears. Consequently, an indirect exciton acquires an effective charge proportional to the gradient of the magnetic field. The appearance of the Lorentz force causes the Hall effect for neutral bosons, which can be detected by measurement of the spatially inhomogeneous blueshift of the photoluminescence using a counterflow experiment.

  • 2. Backes, D.
    et al.
    Macià, F.
    Bonetti, Stefano
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA; Stanford University, USA.
    Kukreja, R.
    Ohldag, H.
    Kent, A. D.
    Direct Observation of a Localized Magnetic Soliton in a Spin-Transfer Nanocontact2015In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 115, no 12, article id 127205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the direct observation of a localized magnetic soliton in a spin-transfer nanocontact using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. Experiments are conducted on a lithographically defined 150 nm diameter nanocontact to an ultrathin ferromagnetic multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Element-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism images show an abrupt onset of a magnetic soliton excitation localized beneath the nanocontact at a threshold current. However, the amplitude of the excitation ≃25° at the contact center is far less than that predicted (⪅180°), showing that the spin dynamics is not described by existing models.

  • 3.
    Barth, A
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hauser, K
    Andersson, J
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Karjalainen, E-L
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Proton countertransport by the Ca2+ pump: Pathways and protonation sites studied by infrared spectroscopy and computation2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Infrared spectroscopy of proteins2007In: Biochim Biophys Acta: Bioenergetics, ISSN 0006-3002, Vol. 1767, no 9, p. 1073-101Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This review discusses the application of infrared spectroscopy to the study of proteins. The focus is on the mid-infrared spectral region and the study of protein reactions by reaction-induced infrared difference spectroscopy.

  • 5.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Structural dynamics of the Ca2+-ATPase studied by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy2008In: Spectroscopy, Vol. 22, p. 63-82Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Protonation of acidic residues in the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA 1a) was studied by multiconformation continuum electrostatic calculations in the Ca(2+)-bound state Ca(2)E1, in the Ca(2+)-free state E2(TG) with bound thapsigargin, and in the E2P (ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme) analog state with MgF(4)(2-) E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)). Around physiological pH, all acidic Ca(2+) ligands (Glu(309), Glu(771), Asp(800), and Glu(908)) were unprotonated in Ca(2)E1; in E2(TG) and E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)) Glu(771), Asp(800), and Glu(908) were protonated. Glu(771) and Glu(908) had calculated pK(a) values larger than 14 in E2(TG) and E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)), whereas Asp(800) titrated with calculated pK(a) values near 7.5. Glu(309) had very different pK(a) values in the Ca(2+)-free states: 8.4 in E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)) and 4.7 in E2(TG) because of a different local backbone conformation. This indicates that Glu(309) can switch between a high and a low pK(a) mode, depending on the local backbone conformation. Protonated Glu(309) occupied predominantly two main, very differently orientated side-chain conformations in E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)): one oriented inward toward the other Ca(2+) ligands and one oriented outward toward a protein channel that seems to be in contact with the cytoplasm. Upon deprotonation, Glu(309) adopted completely the outwardly orientated side-chain conformation. The contact of Glu(309) with the cytoplasm in E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)) makes this residue unlikely to bind lumenal protons. Instead it might serve as a proton shuttle between Ca(2+)-binding site I and the cytoplasm. Glu(771), Asp(800), and Glu(908) are proposed to take part in proton countertransport.

  • 6.
    Baym, Gordon
    et al.
    Univ Illinois, Dept Phys, Urbana, IL, USA.
    Beck, D. H.
    Niels Bohr Inst, Niels Bohr Int Acad, Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Pethick, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Niels Bohr Inst, Niels Bohr Int Acad, Copenhagen , Denmark.
    Transport in very dilute solutions of He-3 in superfluid He-42013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 014512-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by a proposed experimental search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) utilizing neutron-He-3 capture in a dilute solution of He-3 in superfluid He-4, we derive the transport properties of dilute solutions in the regime where the He-3 are classically distributed and rapid He-3-He-3 scatterings keep the He-3 in equilibrium. Our microscopic framework takes into account phonon-phonon, phonon-He-3, and He-3-He-3 scatterings. We then apply these calculations to measurements by Rosenbaum et al. [J. Low Temp. Phys. 16, 131 (1974)] and by Lamoreaux et al. [Europhys. Lett. 58, 718 (2002)] of dilute solutions in the presence of a heat flow. We find satisfactory agreement of theory with the data, serving to confirm our understanding of the microscopics of the helium in the future nEDM experiment.

  • 7.
    Bergholtz, E.J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Karlhede, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A simple view on the quantum Hall system2007In: Bulletin of the American Physical Society, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The physics of the quantum Hall system becomes very simple on a thin torus. Remarkably, however, the rich structure of the system still exists in this limit. On the very thin torus the many body problem reduces to a one-dimensional classical electrostatic problem and both the abelian and the non-abelian quantum Hall states are manifested as gapped one-dimensional crystals, Tao-Thouless states, with fractionally charged excitations that appear as domain walls between degenerate ground states. These states represent, but are extreme forms of, the observed states in the bulk and their qualitative properties (such as quasiparticle degeneracies, quantum numbers, relative size of the gaps etc.) remain the same. For the gapless states, there is a phase transition at finite thickness to phases different from the gapped crystals. At half-filling in the lowest Landau level, this new phase is a Luttinger liquid of neutral dipoles which is adiabatically connected to the gapless state observed in the bulk. The existence of the gapless phase on the thin (but finite) torus provides an explicit microscopic example of how weakly interacting quasiparticles moving in a reduced (zero) magnetic field emerge as the low energy sector of strongly interacting electrons in a strong magnetic field.

  • 8.
    Bergholtz, E.J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Karlhede, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    An Exact Solution for the Half-filled Lowest Landau Level2006In: Bulletin of the American Physical Society, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an exact solution for the interacting electron gas in the half-filled lowest Landau level on a thin torus. The low energy sector consists of non-interacting, one-dimensional, neutral fermions (dipoles). The ground state, which is homogeneous, is the Fermi sea obtained by filling the negative energy states and the excited states are the gapless neutral excitations out of this one-dimensional sea. We identify this ground state as a version of the Rezayi-Read state, and find that it develops continuously, as the circumference grows, into the Rezayi-Read state that is believed to describe the observed metallic phase in the two-dimensional system. This suggests a Luttinger liquid description of the half-filled Landau level.

  • 9.
    Bergholtz, Emil J
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Karlhede, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Half-filled lowest Landau level on a thin torus.2005In: Phys Rev Lett, ISSN 0031-9007, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 026802-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We solve a model that describes an interacting electron gas in the half-filled lowest Landau level on a thin torus, with radius of the order of the magnetic length. The low-energy sector consists of noninteracting, one-dimensional, neutral fermions. The ground state, which is homogeneous, is the Fermi sea obtained by filling the negative energy states, and the excited states are gapless neutral excitations out of this one-dimensional sea. Although the limit considered is extreme, the solution has a striking resemblance to the composite fermion description of the bulk \nu = 1/2 state—the ground state is homogeneous and the excitations are neutral and gapless. This suggests a one-dimensional Luttinger liquid description, with possible observable effects in transport experiments, of the bulk state where it develops continuously from the state on a thin torus as the radius increases.

  • 10.
    Bergholtz, Emil J
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Karlhede, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    'One-dimensional' theory of the quantum Hall system2006In: Journal of Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Experiment, no L04001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider the lowest Landau level on a torus as a function of its circumference L_1. When L_1 → 0, the ground state at general rational filling fraction is a crystal with a gap—a Tao–Thouless state. For filling fractions ν = p/(2pm + 1), these states are the limits of Laughlin's or Jain's wavefunctions describing the gapped quantum Hall states when L_1 → ∞. For the half-filled Landau level, there is a transition to a Fermi sea of non-interacting neutral fermions (dipoles), or rather to a Luttinger liquid modification thereof, at L_1 ~ 5 magnetic lengths. Using exact diagonalization we identify this state as a version of the Rezayi–Read state, and find that it develops continuously into the state that is believed to describe the observed metallic phase as L_1 → ∞. Furthermore, the effective Landau level structure that emerges within the lowest Landau level is found to be a consequence of the magnetic symmetries.

  • 11.
    Bonetti, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    X-ray imaging of spin currents and magnetisation dynamics at the nanoscale2017In: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, ISSN 0953-8984, E-ISSN 1361-648X, Vol. 29, no 13, article id 133004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how spins move in time and space is the aim of both fundamental and applied research in modern magnetism. Over the past three decades, research in this field has led to technological advances that have had a major impact on our society, while improving the understanding of the fundamentals of spin physics. However, important questions still remain unanswered, because it is experimentally challenging to directly observe spins and their motion with a combined high spatial and temporal resolution. In this article, we present an overview of the recent advances in x-ray microscopy that allow researchers to directly watch spins move in time and space at the microscopically relevant scales. We discuss scanning x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) at resonant soft x-ray edges, which is available at most modern synchrotron light sources. This technique measures magnetic contrast through the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect at the resonant absorption edges, while focusing the x-ray radiation at the nanometre scale, and using the intrinsic pulsed structure of synchrotron-generated x-rays to create time-resolved images of magnetism at the nanoscale. In particular, we discuss how the presence of spin currents can be detected by imaging spin accumulation, and how the magnetisation dynamics in thin ferromagnetic films can be directly imaged. We discuss how a direct look at the phenomena allows for a deeper understanding of the the physics at play, that is not accessible to other, more indirect techniques. Finally, we present an overview of the exciting opportunities that lie ahead to further understand the fundamentals of novel spin physics, opportunities offered by the appearance of diffraction limited storage rings and free electron lasers.

  • 12.
    Bonetti, Stefano
    et al.
    Stanford University, USA; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Kukreja, R.
    Chen, Z.
    Macià, F.
    Hernàndez, J. M.
    Eklund, A.
    Backes, D.
    Frisch, J.
    Katine, J.
    Malm, G.
    Urazhdin, S.
    Kent, A. D.
    Stöhr, J.
    Ohldag, H.
    Dürr, H. A.
    Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 8889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices.

  • 13.
    Bonetti, Stefano
    et al.
    Stanford University, USA; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Kukreja, Roopali
    Chen, Zhao
    Spoddig, Detlef
    Ollefs, Katharina
    Schöppner, Christian
    Meckenstock, Ralf
    Ney, Andreas
    Pinto, Jude
    Houanche, Richard
    Frisch, Josef
    Stöhr, Joachim
    Dürr, Hermann A.
    Ohldag, Hendrik
    Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range2015In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 86, no 9, article id 093703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  • 14.
    Borysov, Stanislav S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Platz, Daniel
    de Wijn, Astrid S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    Tolen, Eric A.
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Los Alamos Natl Lab, Div Theoret, Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA.
    Haviland, David B.
    Reconstruction of tip-surface interactions with multimodal intermodulation atomic force microscopy2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 88, no 11, p. 115405-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a theoretical framework for reconstructing tip-surface interactions using the intermodulation technique when more than one eigenmode is required to describe the cantilever motion. Two particular cases of bimodal motion are studied numerically: one bending and one torsional mode, and two bending modes. We demonstrate the possibility of accurate reconstruction of a two-dimensional conservative force field for the former case, while dissipative forces are studied for the latter.

  • 15.
    Budich, Jan Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Charge conservation protected topological phases2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 87, no 16, p. 161103-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss the relation between particle number conservation and topological phases. In four spatial dimensions, we find that systems belonging to different topological phases in the presence of a U(1) charge conservation can be connected adiabatically, i.e., without closing the gap, upon intermediately breaking this local symmetry by a superconducting term. The time reversal preserving topological insulator states in two and three dimensions which can be obtained from the four-dimensional parent state by dimensional reduction inherit this protection by charge conservation. Hence, all topological insulators can be adiabatically connected to a trivial insulating state without breaking time reversal symmetry, provided an intermediate superconducting term is allowed during the adiabatic deformation. Conversely, in one spatial dimension, non-symmetry-protected topological phases occur only in systems that break U(1) charge conservation. These results can intuitively be understood by considering a natural embedding of the classifying spaces of charge conserving Hamiltonians into the corresponding Bogoliubov-de Gennes classes.

  • 16.
    Budich, Jan Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ardonne, Eddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Equivalent topological invariants for one-dimensional Majorana wires in symmetry class D2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 88, no 7, p. 075419-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topological superconductors in one spatial dimension exhibiting a single Majorana bound state at each end are distinguished from trivial gapped systems by aZ(2) topological invariant. Originally, this invariant was calculated by Kitaev in terms of the Pfaffian of the Majorana representation of the Hamiltonian: The sign of this Pfaffian divides the set of all gapped quadratic forms of Majorana fermions into two inequivalent classes. In the more familiar Bogoliubov de Gennes mean-field description of superconductivity, an emergent particle-hole symmetry gives rise to a quantized Zak-Berry phase, the value of which is also a topological invariant. In this work, we explicitly show the equivalence of these two formulations by relating both of them to the phase winding of the transformation matrix that brings the Majorana representation matrix of the Hamiltonian into its Jordan normal form.

  • 17.
    Budich, Jan Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ardonne, Eddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Fractional topological phase in one-dimensional flat bands with nontrivial topology2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 035139-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider a topologically nontrivial flat-band structure in one spatial dimension in the presence of nearest-and next-nearest-neighbor Hubbard interaction. The noninteracting band structure is characterized by a symmetry-protected topologically quantized Berry phase. At certain fractional fillings, a gapped phase with a filling-dependent ground-state degeneracy and fractionally charged quasiparticles emerges. At filling 1/3, the ground states carry a fractional Berry phase in the momentum basis. These features at first glance suggest a certain analogy to the fractional quantum Hall scenario in two dimensions. We solve the interacting model analytically in the physically relevant limit of a large band gap in the underlying band structure, the analog of a lowest Landau level projection. Our solution affords a simple physical understanding of the properties of the gapped interacting phase. We pinpoint crucial differences to the fractional quantum Hall case by studying the Berry phase and the entanglement entropy associated with the degenerate ground states. In particular, we conclude that the fractional topological phase in one-dimensional flat bands is not a one-dimensional analog of the two-dimensional fractional quantum Hall states, but rather a charge density wave with a nontrivial Berry phase. Finally, the symmetry-protected nature of the Berry phase of the interacting phase is demonstrated by explicitly constructing a gapped interpolation to a state with a trivial Berry phase.

  • 18. Budich, Jan Carl
    et al.
    Carlström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kunst, Flore K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bergholtz, Emil J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Symmetry-protected nodal phases in non-Hermitian systems2019In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 99, no 4, article id 041406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-Hermitian (NH) Hamiltonians have become an important asset for the effective description of various physical systems that are subject to dissipation. Motivated by recent experimental progress on realizing the NH counterparts of gapless phases such as Weyl semimetals, here we investigate how NH symmetries affect the occurrence of exceptional points (EPs), that generalize the notion of nodal points in the spectrum beyond the Hermitian realm. Remarkably, we find that the dimension of the manifold of EPs is generically increased by one as compared to the case without symmetry. This leads to nodal surfaces formed by EPs that are stable as long as a protecting symmetry is preserved, and that are connected by open Fermi volumes. We illustrate our findings with analytically solvable two-band lattice models in one and two spatial dimensions, and show how they are readily generalized to generic NH crystalline systems.

  • 19.
    Campanini, Donato
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nanocalorimetry of electronic phase transitions in systems with unconventional superconductivity and magnetic ordering2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, low temperature specific heat measurements on small (μg) single crystals of different superconducting and magnetic systems are presented. The device used in this work features a combination of high sensitivity and good accuracy over the temperature range 1-400 K and allows measurements in high magnetic fields. It consists of a stack of thin films deposited in the center of a Si3N4 membrane. A batch process for the production of up to 48 calorimeters from a 2" silicon wafer was developed in order to overcome the scarcity of devices and allow systematic investigations. With abundance of calorimeters, single crystals of three different systems were studied.

    Fe2P is the parent compound of a broad family of magnetocaloric materials. The first-order para- to ferromagnetic phase transition at TC = 216 K was investigated for fields H up to 2 T, applied parallel and perpendicular to the easy axis of magnetization c. Strikingly different phase contours were obtained depending on the field direction. In particular, for H perpendicular to c, two different ferromagnetic phases, with magnetization parallel and perpendicular to c are found. It was also possible to observe the superheating/supercooling states, the latent heat, and the structural change associated to the first-order transition.

    BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 is a member of the recently discovered iron-based high-temperature superconductors family. Crystals with three different compositions were measured to study the doping dependence of the superconducting properties in the overdoped regime (x > 0.30). The electronic specific heat at low temperatures was analyzed with a two band α model, which allows to extract the gap amplitudes and their weights. The degree of gap anisotropy was investigated from in-field measurements. Additional information on the system was obtained by a combined analysis of the condensation energy and upper critical field.

    URu2Si2, a heavy fermion material, was studied around and above the hidden-order temperature THO = 17.5 K. The origin of the hidden-order phase is still not understood. High-resolution specific heat data were collected to help clarify if any pseudogap state is seen to exist above THO. We found no evidence for any bulk phase transition above THO.

  • 20.
    Campanini, Donato
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Thermodynamic characterization of superconducting and magnetic materials using nanocalorimetry2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurement of specific heat is a powerful technique for the investigation of novel materials. Superconducting and magnetic systems, in particular, can be thoroughly characterized by studying their electronic contribution to the specific heat. To investigate their behavior in magnetic fields, single crystals need to be used, since the magnetic properties are dependent on the crystalline orientation. Crystal quality is often enhanced when sizes are reduced down to below the 100 μm scale, which is lower than the limit of conventional calorimeters. Nanocalorimetry allows to detect the weak electronic signature in the specific heat for such small samples with a preserved combination of high resolution and good accuracy. This is achieved by miniaturizing the device using microsystems technology and by a proper optimization of the measurement conditions.

    In this thesis, a nanocalorimeter designed for the study of samples with masses from sub-μg  to 100 μg in the temperature range 1-350 K is used for studying three different systems, yielding insights into their physical properties.

    In the magnetocaloric compound Fe2P a deep thermodynamic understanding of the first-order magnetic phase transition at the Curie temperature TC ≈ 217 K is lacking. The nanocalorimeter is used to map the magnetic phase diagram for fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the easy axis of magnetization. Two different phase diagrams are obtained depending on the applied field orientation. The first-order magnetic phase transition is characterized by specific and latent heat, providing a textbook example of thermodynamic properties around such a transition. The results are complemented with a combined nanocalorimetry - x-ray diffraction study and by magnetization measurements.

    The iron-based high-temperature superconductor BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 shows several anomalous physical properties which have been associated to the presence of a quantum critical point. High-resolution specific heat measurements are an important piece of the puzzle in understanding the behavior of this material. The specific heat is measured as a function of phosphorus doping x in the superoptimally substituted range and several superconducting parameters are extracted. An evolution from a single-gap to a two-gap is seen with doping, as well as a decrease of the London penetration depth close to optimum doping, without signs of divergence.

    The superconducting properties are as well investigated in the metastable β phase of gallium. β-Ga is obtained in-situ from the stable α-Ga by increasing the temperature about 10 K above the melting point. This novel method to produce β-Ga allows more reproducible and reliable measurements in comparison to traditional methods. A thorough thermodynamic characterization of the metastable phase is obtained, giving insights into the conditions for a strongly enhanced superconductivity in β-Ga in comparison to α-Ga. β-Ga is found to be a strong-coupling superconductor, with a 2.55 higher density of states at the Fermi energy in comparison to α-Ga.

    These measurements demonstrate how several problems in condensed matter physics can be addressed through nanocalorimetry, which allows mapping various phase diagrams and obtaining fundamental thermodynamic properties on high-quality samples in magnetic fields.

     

  • 21. Cerreta, A.
    et al.
    Gaina, R.
    Nuccio, L.
    Marozau, I.
    Sen, K.
    de Andrés Prada, Roberto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Sarkar, S.
    Bernhard, C.
    Magnetic proximity effect and spin-polarization of the charge carriers in La2/3Sr1/3MnO3/YBa2Cu3O7/Alq3/Co spin valvesIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Chaparro, C.
    et al.
    Fang, L.
    Claus, H.
    Rydh, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Crabtree, G. W.
    Stanev, V.
    Kwok, W. K.
    Welp, U.
    Doping dependence of the specific heat of single crystal bafe2(as1 xpx)(2)2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 85, no 18, p. 184525-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present specific heat measurements on a series of BaFe2(As1-xPx)(2) single crystals with phosphorous doping ranging from x = 0.3 to x = 0.55. Our results reveal that BaFe2(As1-xPx)(2) follows the scaling Delta C/T-c approximate to T-c(2) remarkably well. The clean-limit nature of this material imposes additional restraints on theories aimed at explaining the scaling. Furthermore, we find that the Ginzburg-Landau parameter decreases significantly with doping whereas the superconducting anisotropy is Gamma approximate to 2.6, independent of doping.

  • 23. Cronholm, Pontus
    et al.
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Hedberg, Jonas
    Lowe, Troy A.
    Winnberg, Lina
    Elihn, Karine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Wallinder, Inger Odnevall
    Möller, Lennart
    Intracellular Uptake and Toxicity of Ag and CuO Nanoparticles: A Comparison Between Nanoparticles and their Corresponding Metal Ions2013In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 970-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increased understanding of nanoparticle toxicity and its impact on human health is essential to enable a safe use of nanoparticles in our society. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of a Trojan horse type mechanism for the toxicity of Ag-nano and CuO-nano particles and their corresponding metal ionic species (using CuCl2 and AgNO3), i.e., the importance of the solid particle to mediate cellular uptake and subsequent release of toxic species inside the cell. The human lung cell lines A549 and BEAS-2B are used and cell death/membrane integrity and DNA damage are investigated by means of trypan blue staining and the comet assay, respectively. Chemical analysis of the cellular dose of copper and silver is performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy are employed to study cellular uptake and particle-cell interactions. The results confirm a high uptake of CuO-nano and Ag-nano compared to no, or low, uptake of the soluble salts. CuO-nano induces both cell death and DNA damage whereas CuCl2 induces no toxicity. The opposite is observed for silver, where Ag-nano does not cause any toxicity, whereas AgNO3 induces a high level of cell death. In conclusion: CuO-nano toxicity is predominantly mediated by intracellular uptake and subsequent release of copper ions, whereas no toxicity is observed for Ag-nano due to low release of silver ions within short time periods.

  • 24.
    de Andrés Prada, Roberto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Physics Department and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials (FriMat), University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Pulsed laser deposition and nanofabrication of mesoscopic devices based on cuprates and manganites2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the growth, the nano-fabrication and the study of the magneto-transport properties of Superconductor/Ferromagnet/Superconductor (SFS) structures from complex oxides such as the high Tc superconducting cuprate YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and the ferromagnetic manganites La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 and La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LCMO and LSMO), deposited with the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique.The present work has been possible thanks to the collaboration between the “Magnetism and Superconductivity” Group at the University of Fribourg, in Switzerland, and the “Experimentell Kondenserade Materiens Fysik” Group at Stockholm University, in Sweden.

    Earlier, the two research groups in Fribourg and Stockholm had studied SFS structures from YBCO/LaMnO3/YBCO multilayers with 20 nm thick ferromagnetic and insulating LaMnO3 barriers, and obtained signs of an unconventional spin-triplet current across these structures. This finding motivated the present thesis work with a focus on two main aspects.

    Firstly, to explore other candidate materials suitable as barriers and optimise their growth conditions as to maintain a large ferromagnetic moment and thus a high spin polarisation of the charge carriers. Secondly, to study what happens when the thickness of the ferromagnetic and insulating LaMnO3 barrier is reduced well below 20 nm to enable larger supercurrents.

    It has been shown for a series of YBCO/LCMO multilayers that the ferromagnetic moment of LCMO depends critically on the PLD growth conditions as well as on the thickness and even structural details of the YBCO layer on which they are grown. Furthermore, a protocol has been established to grow heterostructures with strongly ferromagnetic manganite layers embedded in thick YBCO layers by optimising the PLD growth conditions and by substituting the bottom YBCO layer with a Co and Ca substituted version of YBCO that has a tetragonal structure (tYBCO) instead of the orthorhombic one of plain YBCO.

    Devices suitable for perpendicular magneto-transport measurements have been nano-fabricated from YBCO/manganite/YBCO multilayers with ~10 nm thick LCMO and LSMO layers as the F barriers. While no clear indications of a spin-triplet component of the superconducting order parameter have been obtained yet, a negative and hysteretic magneto-resistance has been observed that is indicative of a strong ferromagnetic order in the thin manganite barrier. The latter suggests a potential memory functionality of such structures that could be exploited in future spintronic memory devices.

    Moreover, devices have been fabricated on SFS structures with a reduced thickness of the LaMnO3 barrier of 10 nm and 5 nm. These samples were grown prior to the beginning of this PhD work using non optimised growth conditions, and it was found that the ferromagnetic properties of these LaMnO3 barriers are strongly deteriorated. It remains to be seen whether the ferromagnetic order of such thin LaMnO3 layers can be also recovered by using the optimised growth conditions as for LSMO and LCMO.

  • 25.
    de Andrés Prada, Roberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Gaina, R.
    Biškup, N.
    Varela, M.
    Stahn, J.
    Bernhard, C.
    Controlling the strength of ferromagnetic order in YBa2Cu3O7/La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 multilayers2019In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 100, no 11, article id 115129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With dc magnetization and polarized neutron reflectometry we studied the ferromagnetic response of YBa2Cu3O7/La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 (YBCO/LCMO) multilayers that are grown with pulsed laser deposition. We found that whereas for certain growth conditions (denoted as A type) the ferromagnetic moment of the LCMO layer is strongly dependent on the structural details of the YBCO layer on which it is deposited, for others (B type) the ferromagnetism of LCMO is much more robust. Both kinds of multilayers are of similar structural quality, but electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies with a scanning transmission electron microscope reveal an enhanced average Mn oxidation state of +3.5 for the A-type as opposed to the B-type samples, for which it is close to the nominal value of +3.33. The related, additional hole doping of the A-type LCMO layers, which likely originates from La and/or Mn vacancies, can explain their fragile ferromagnetic order, since it places them close to the boundary of the ferromagnetic order at which even weak perturbations can induce an antiferromagnetic or glassy state. On the other hand, we show that the B-type samples allow one to obtain YBCO/LCMO heterostructures with very thick YBCO layers and, yet, strongly ferromagnetic LCMO layers.

  • 26.
    de Andrés Prada, Roberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. University of Fribourg, Switzerland.
    Golod, Taras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bernhard, C.
    Krasnov, Vladimir M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Growth and Nanofabrication of All-Perovskite Superconducting/Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Junctions2019In: Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism, ISSN 1557-1939, E-ISSN 1557-1947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We fabricate and study experimentally all-perovskite-oxide superconductor/ferromagnetic insulator/superconductor (S/FI/S) tunnel junctions made out of the high-temperature cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7−y (YBCO) and the colossal magnetoresistive manganite LaMnO3 (LMO) in the ferromagnetic insulator state. YBCO/LMO/YBCO heterostructures with different LMO thicknesses (5, 10, and 20 nm) are grown epitaxially via pulsed laser deposition. Nanoscale S/FI/S junctions with sizes down to 300 nm are made by three-dimensional nano-sculpturing with focused ion beam. Junctions with a thick (20 nm) LMO barrier exhibit a large negative magnetoresistance below TCurie∼160" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-table; line-height: normal; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">TCurie∼160TCurie∼160 K, typical for colossal magnetoresistive manganites, as well as a kink in the current-voltage characteristics at large bias (V∼1" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-table; line-height: normal; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">V∼1V∼1–2 Volts), attributed to Zener-type tunneling. However, they do not show a measurable Josephson current. On the contrary, junctions with the thinnest 5-nm LMO barrier exhibit a large supercurrent and no signs of magnetism. The latter may indicate the presence of pinholes due to thickness inhomogeneity and/or a ∼" role="presentation" style="box-sizing: border-box; display: inline-table; line-height: normal; letter-spacing: normal; word-spacing: normal; overflow-wrap: normal; white-space: nowrap; float: none; direction: ltr; max-width: none; max-height: none; min-width: 0px; min-height: 0px; border: 0px; padding: 0px; margin: 0px; position: relative;">∼∼ 2 nm dead magnetic layer at the YBCO / LMO interface caused, e.g., by interdiffusion or strain. The junction with an intermediate 10-nm LMO barrier exhibited a desired S/FI/S junction behavior with significant negative magnetoresistance and signatures of a small Josephson current.

  • 27.
    de Wijn, Astrid S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    (In)commensurability, scaling, and multiplicity of friction in nanocrystals and application to gold nanocrystals on graphite2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 86, no 8, p. 085429-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scaling of friction with the contact size A and (in)commensurabilty of nanoscopic and mesoscopic crystals on a regular substrate are investigated analytically for triangular nanocrystals on hexagonal substrates. The crystals are assumed to be stiff, but not completely rigid. Commensurate and incommensurate configurations are identified systematically. It is shown that three distinct friction branches coexist, an incommensurate one that does not scale with the contact size (A(0)) and two commensurate ones which scale differently (with A(1/2) and A) and are associated with various combinations of commensurate and incommensurate lattice parameters and orientations. This coexistence is a direct consequence of the two-dimensional nature of the contact layer, and such multiplicity exists in all geometries consisting of regular lattices. To demonstrate this, the procedure is repeated for rectangular geometry. The scaling of irregularly shaped crystals is also considered, and again three branches are found (A(1/4), A(3/4), A). Based on the scaling properties, a quantity is defined which can be used to classify commensurability in infinite as well as finite contacts. Finally, the consequences for friction experiments on gold nanocrystals on graphite are discussed.

  • 28.
    Edvardsson, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kunst, Flore K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bergholtz, Emil J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Non-Hermitian extensions of higher-order topological phases and their biorthogonal bulk-boundary correspondence2019In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 99, no 8, article id 081302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-Hermitian Hamiltonians, which describe a wide range of dissipative systems, and higher-order topological phases, which exhibit novel boundary states on corners and hinges, comprise two areas of intense current research. Here we investigate systems where these frontiers merge and formulate a generalized biorthogonal bulk-boundary correspondence, which dictates the appearance of boundary modes at parameter values that are, in general, radically different from those that mark phase transitions in periodic systems. By analyzing the interplay between corner/hinge, edge/surface and bulk degrees of freedom we establish that the non-Hermitian extensions of higher-order topological phases exhibit an even richer phenomenology than their Hermitian counterparts and that this can be understood in a unifying way within our biorthogonal framework. Saliently this works in the presence of the non-Hermitian skin effect, and also naturally encompasses genuinely non-Hermitian phenomena in the absence thereof.

  • 29.
    Elenius, Måns
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA) (together with KTH).
    Computer Simulations of Simple Liquids with Tetrahedral Local Order: the Supercooled Liquid, Solids and Phase Transitions2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of complex condensed matter systems is an area of intense study. In this thesis, some properties of simple liquids with strong preference for tetrahedral local ordering are explored. These liquids are amenable to supercooling, and give complex crystalline structures on eventual crystallisation. All liquids studied are simple, monatomic and are similar to real metallic liquids.

    The vibrational density of states of a glass created in simulation is calculated. We show a correspondence between the vibrational properties of the crystal and the glass, indicating that the vibrational spectra of crystals can be used to understand the more complex vibrational spectra of the glass of the same substance.

    The dynamics of supercooled liquids is investigated using a previously not implemented comprehensive measure of structural relaxation. This new measure decays more slowly in the deeply supercooled domain than the commonly used measure.

    A new atomic model for octagonal quasicrystals is presented. The model is based on findings from a molecular dynamics simulation that resulted in 45˚ twinned β-Mn. A decoration is derived from the β-Mn unit cell and the unit cell of the intermediate structure found at the twinning interface.

    Extensive simulations are used to explore the phase diagram of a liquid at low densities. The resulting phase diagram shows a spinodal line and a phase coexistence region between a liquid and a crystalline phase ending in a critical point. This contradicts the old conclusion of the Landau theory -- that continuous transitions between liquids and crystals cannot exist

    The same liquid is explored at higher densities. Upon cooling the liquid performs a first order liquid-liquid phase transition. The low temperature liquid is shown to be strong and to have very good glass forming abilities. This result offers new insights into fragile to strong transitions and suggests the possibility of a good metallic glass former.

  • 30.
    Elenius, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA) (together with KTH).
    Dzugutov, Mikhail
    Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Evidence for a liquid-solid critical point in a simple monatomic system2009In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 131, no 104502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly believed that the transition line  separating a liquid and a solid cannot be interrupted by a  critical point. This opinion is based on the traditional  symmetry argument that an isotropic liquid cannot be  continuously transformed into a crystal with a discrete  rotational and translational symmetry. We present here a  molecular-dynamics simulation of a simple monatomic system  suggesting the existence of a liquid-solid spinodal terminating  at a critical point. We show that, in the critical region, the  isotropic liquid continuously transforms into a phase with a  mesoscopic order similar to that of the smectic liquid  crystals. We argue that the existence of both the spinodal and  the critical point can be explained by the close structural  proximity between the mesophase and the crystal. This indicates  a possibility of finding a similar thermodynamic behaviour in  gelating colloids, liquid crystals and polymers.

  • 31.
    Elenius, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA) (together with KTH).
    Dzugutov, Mikhail
    KTH, MSE.
    Evidence for compact cooperatively rearranging regions in a supercooled liquid2009In: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, ISSN 0953-8984, Vol. 21, no 24, p. 245101-1-245101-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine structural relaxation in a supercooled glass-forming liquid simulated by constant-energy constant-volume (NVE) molecular dynamics. Time correlations of the total kinetic energy fluctuations are used as a comprehensive measure of the system’s approach to the ergodic equilibrium. We find that, under cooling, the total structural relaxation becomes delayed as compared with the decay of the component of the intermediate scattering function corresponding to the main peak of the structure factor. This observation can be explained by collective movements of particles preserving many-body structural  orrelations within compact three-dimensional (3D) cooperatively rearranging regions.

  • 32.
    Elenius, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA) (together with KTH).
    Zetterling, Fredrik
    Dzugutov, Mikhail
    KTH, MSE.
    Fredrickson, Daniel
    Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin.
    Lidin, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Department of Inorganic Chemistry.
    Structural model for octagonal quasicrystals derived from octagonal symmetry elements arising in beta-Mn crystallization of a simple monatomic liquid2009In: Physical Review B Condensed Matter, ISSN 0163-1829, E-ISSN 1095-3795, Vol. 79, no 14, p. 144201-1-144201-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While performing molecular-dynamics simulations of a simple monatomic liquid, we observed the crystallization of a material displaying octagonal symmetry in its simulated diffraction pattern. Inspection of the atomic arrangements in the crystallization product reveals large grains of the beta-Mn structure aligned along a common fourfold axis, with 45° rotations between neighboring grains. These 45° rotations can be traced to the intercession of a second crystalline structure fused epitaxially to the beta-Mn domain surfaces, whose primitive cell has lattice parameters a=b=c=a_{beta-Mn}, alpha =beta =90°, and gamma =45°. This secondary phase adopts a structure which appears to have no known counterpart in the experimental literature, but can be simply derived from the Cr3Si and Al3Zr4 structure types. We used these observations as the basis for an atomistic structural model for octagonal quasicrystals, in which the beta-Mn and the secondary phase structure unit cells serve as square and rhombic tiles (in projection), respectively. Its diffraction pattern down the octagonal axis resembles those experimentally measured. The model is unique in being consistent with high-resolution electron microscopy images showing square and rhombic units with edge-lengths equal to that of the beta-Mn unit cell. Energy minimization of this configuration, using the same pair potential as above, results in an alternative octagonal quasiperiodic structure with the same tiling but a different atomic decoration and diffraction pattern.

  • 33. Fransson, J.
    et al.
    She, J. -H
    Pietronero, L.
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy at local defects in graphene2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 87, no 24, p. 245404-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address local inelastic scattering from the vibrational impurity adsorbed onto graphene and the evolution of the local density of electron states near the impurity from a weak to strong coupling regime. For weak coupling the local electronic structure is distorted by inelastic scattering developing peaks or dips and steps. These features should be detectable in the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy d(2)I/dV(2) using local probing techniques. Inelastic Friedel oscillations distort the spectral density at energies close to the inelastic mode. In the strong coupling limit, a local negative U center forms in the atoms surrounding the impurity site. For those atoms, the Dirac cone structure is fully destroyed, that is, the linear energy dispersion as well as the V-shaped local density of electron states is completely destroyed. We further consider the effects of the negative U formation and its evolution from weak to strong coupling. The negative U site effectively acts as a local impurity such that sharp resonances appear in the local electronic structure. The main resonances are caused by elastic scattering off the impurity site, and the features are dressed by the presence of vibrationally activated side resonances. Going from weak to strong coupling, changes the local electronic structure from being Dirac-cone-like including midgap states, to a fully destroyed Dirac cone with only the impurity resonances remaining.

  • 34.
    Fremling, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Analytical Fock coefficients of the Laughlin state on the torusManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Fremling, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Coherent State Wave Functions on the Torus2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the study of the quantum Hall effect there are still many unresolved problems. One of these is how to generate representative wave functions for ground states on other geometries than the planar and spherical. We study one such geometry, the toroidal one, where the periodic boundary conditions must be properly taken into account.

    As a tool to study the torus we investigate the properties of various types of localized states, similar to the coherent states of the harmonic oscillator, which are maximally localized in phase space. We consider two alternative definitions of localized states in the lowest Landau level (LLL) on a torus. One is the projection of the coordinate delta function onto the LLL. Another definition, proposed by Haldane & Rezayi, is to consider the set of functions which have all their zeros at a single point. Since all LLL wave functions on a torus, are uniquely defined by the position of their zeros, this defines a set of functions that are expected to be localized around the point maximally far away from the zeros. These two families of localized states have many properties in common with the coherent states on the plane and on the sphere, e.g. a simple resolution of unity and a simple self-reproducing kernel. However, we show that only the projected delta function is maximally localized.

    We find that because of modular covariance, there are severe restrictions on which wave functions that are acceptable on the torus. As a result, we can write down a trial wave function for the  state, that respects the modular covariance, and has good numerical overlap with the exact coulomb ground state.

    Finally we present preliminary calculations of the antisymmetric component of the viscosity tensor for the proposed, modular covariant, state, and find that it is in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  • 36.
    Fremling, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Quantum Hall Wave Functions on the Torus2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), now entering it's fourth decade, continues to draw attention from the condensed matter community. New experiments in recent years are raising hopes that it will be possible to observe quasi-particles with non-abelian anyonic statistics. These particles could form the building blocks of a quantum computer.

    The quantum Hall states have topologically protected energy gaps to the low-lying set of excitations. This topological order is not a locally measurable quantity but rather a non-local object, and it is one of the keys to it's stability. From an early stage understanding of the FQHE has been facilitate by constructing trial wave functions. The topological classification of these wave functions have given further insight to the nature of the FQHE.

    An early, and successful, wave function construction for filling fractions ν=p/(2p+1) was that of composite fermions on planar and spherical geometries. Recently, new developments using conformal field theory have made it possible to also construct the full Haldane-Halperin hierarchy wave functions on planar and spherical geometries. In this thesis we extend this construction to a toroidal geometry, i.e. a flat surface with periodic boundary conditions.

    One of the defining features of topological states of matter in two dimensions is that the ground state is not unique on surfaces with non trivial topology, such as a torus. The archetypical example is the fractional quantum Hall effect, where a state at filling fraction ν=p/q, has at least a q-fold degeneracy on a torus. This has been shown explicitly for a few cases, such as the Laughlin states and the the Moore-Read states, by explicit construction of candidate electron wave functions with good overlap with numerically found states. In this thesis, we construct explicit torus wave functions for a large class of experimentally important quantum liquids, namely the chiral hierarchy states in the lowest Landau level. These states, which includes the prominently observed positive Jain sequence at filling fractions ν=p/(2p+1), are characterized by having boundary modes with only one chirality.

    Our construction relies heavily on previous work that expressed the hierarchy wave functions on a plane or a sphere in terms of correlation functions in a conformal field theory. This construction can be taken over to the torus when care is taken to ensure correct behaviour under the modular transformations that leave the geometry of the torus unchanged. Our construction solves the long standing problem of engineering torus wave functions for multi-component many-body states. Since the resulting expressions are rather complicated, we have carefully compared the simplest example, that of ν=2/5, with numerically found wave functions. We have found an extremely good overlap for arbitrary values of the modular parameter τ, that describes the geometry of the torus.

    Having explicit torus wave functions allows us to use the methods developed by Read and Read \& Rezayi to numerically compute the quantum Hall viscosity. Hall viscosity is conjectured to be a topologically protected macroscopic transport coefficient characterizing the quantum Hall state. It is related to the shift of the same QH-fluid when it is put on a sphere. The good agreement with the theoretical prediction for the 2/5 state strongly suggests that our wave functions encodes all relevant topologically information.

    We also consider the Hall viscosity in the limit of a very thin torus. There we find that the viscosity changes as we approach the thin torus limit. Because of this we study the Laughlin state in that limit and see how the change in viscosity arises from a change in the Hamiltonian hopping elements. Finally we conclude that there are both qualitative and quantitative difference between the thin and the square torus. Thus, one has to be careful when interpreting results in the thin torus limit.

  • 37. Gaffney, K. J.
    et al.
    Ji, M.
    Odelius, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Park, S.
    Sun, Z.
    H-bond switching and ligand exchange dynamics in aqueous ionic solution2011In: Chemical Physics Letters, ISSN 0009-2614, E-ISSN 1873-4448, Vol. 504, no 1-3, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aqueous ionic solutions lubricate the chemical machinery of the environment and life. Understanding the impact of ions on the properties of aqueous solutions and how these modified properties influence chemical and conformational dynamics remains an important and elusive objective of physical chemistry research. Here we discuss recent advances in our understanding that have been derived from ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

  • 38.
    Gagge, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Quantum properties of light and matter in one dimension2019Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis concerns topics in non-interacting and interacting quantum physics in one dimension. We present the notions of Wannier functions and tight-binding models. Quantum walks are discussed, quantum mechanical analogues to random walks. We demonstrate the ideas of Bloch oscillation and super-Bloch oscillation - revivals of quantum states for particles in a periodic lattice subject to a constant force. Next, the Rabi model of light-matter interaction is derived. The concept of quantum phase transitions is presented for the Dicke model of superradiance. The idea of adiabatic elimination is used to highlight the connectedness of the Dicke model. Finally, we present a one-dimensional interacting system of resonators and artificial atoms that could be built as a superconducting circuit. Using adiabatic elimination as well as matrix product states, we find the phase diagram of this model.

  • 39. Gils, C.
    et al.
    Ardonne, Eddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Trebst, S.
    Huse, D. A.
    Ludwig, A. W. W.
    Troyer, M.
    Wang, Z.
    Anyonic quantum spin chains: Spin-1 generalizations and topological stability2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 87, no 23, p. 235120-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many interesting parallels between systems of interacting non-Abelian anyons and quantum magnetism occurring in ordinary SU(2) quantum magnets. Here we consider theories of so-called SU(2)(k) anyons, well-known deformations of SU(2), in which only the first k + 1 angular momenta of SU(2) occur. In this paper, we discuss in particular anyonic generalizations of ordinary SU(2) spin chains with an emphasis on anyonic spin S = 1 chains. We find that the overall phase diagrams for these anyonic spin-1 chains closely mirror the phase diagram of the ordinary bilinear-biquadratic spin-1 chain including anyonic generalizations of the Haldane phase, the AKLT construction, and supersymmetric quantum critical points. A novel feature of the anyonic spin-1 chains is an additional topological symmetry that protects the gapless phases. Distinctions further arise in the form of an even/odd effect in the deformation parameter k when considering su(2)(k) anyonic theories with k >= 5, as well as for the special case of the su(2)(4) theory for which the spin-1 representation plays a special role. We also address anyonic generalizations of spin-1/2 chains with a focus on the topological protection provided for their gapless ground states. Finally, we put our results into the context of earlier generalizations of SU(2) quantum spin chains, in particular so-called (fused) Temperley-Lieb chains.

  • 40.
    Golod, Taras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hybrid superconductor junctions with diluted PtNi ferromagnetic interlayer2009Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes experimental investigation of thin films made of diluted Pt 1-x Ni x ferromagnet alloy and Nb-Pt 1-x -Nb Josephson junctions. Such Hybrid Superconductor-Ferromagnet (S-F) Structures are of significant interest because of the new physics involved and possible applications in low temperature and spintronic devices. In many cases, such devices require components with small monodomain ferromagnetic layers, which requires development of specific nano-fabrication techniques. Pt 1-x Ni x alloy is used as the ferromagnet layer due to very good solubility of the two components which results in homogeneous diluted ferromagnet. Systematic analysis of both chemical composition, and ferromagnetic properties of Pt 1-x Ni x thin films for Ni concentrations ranging between 0 and ~70 at.% is performed. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) technique is employed to study chemical composition of Pt 1-x Ni x thin films. To eliminate possible errors during EDS characterization, EDS is used with different electron beam energies, different electron beam incident angles and on the free standing Pt 0.59 Ni 0.41 flakes. Ferromagnetic properties of Pt 1-x Ni x thin films are analyzed by studying the anomalous Hall effect. The Curie temperature of Pt 1-x Ni x films decreases in a non-linear manner with the Ni concentration and has the onset at ~27 at.% of Ni. It is observed that the critical concentration of Ni is lower and the Curie temperature is higher than it had been observed early for the bulk PtNi alloys. The 3D Focused ion Beam Nanosculpturing is used to fabricate nanoscale S-F-S Josephson junctions providing the uniform, monodomain structure of the ferromagnet layer within the junction. The detailed studies of S-F-S Josephson junctions are carried out depending on the size of junction, thickness and composition of the ferromagnet layer. The obtained Fraunhofer modulation of the critical current as a function of in-plane magnetic field serves as evidence for uniformity of the junction properties and monodomain structure of ferromagnet layer. The junction critical current density decreases in spin glass state with increasing Ni concentration. In the ferromagnetic state the maximum current density of the junction starts to increase. The latter is attributed to switching into the pi state as a function of Ni concentration. Simultaneously it is observed that the critical current can completely disappear presumably as the result of stray fields from the F layer in contact leads. The Josephson junction is used as a phase sensitive detector for analysis of vortex states in mesoscopic superconductors. By changing the bias current at constant magnetic field the vortices can be manipulated and the system can be switched between two consecutive vortex states. A mesoscopic superconductor can thus act as a memory cell in which the junction is used both for reading and writing information (vortex).

  • 41.
    Golod, Taras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mesoscopic phenomena in hybrid superconductor/ferromagnet structures2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores peculiar effects of mesoscopic structures revealed at low temperatures. Three particular systems are studied experimentally: Ferromagnetic thin films made of diluted Pt1-xNix alloy, hybrid nanoscale Nb-Pt1-xNix-Nb Josephson junctions, and planar niobium Josephson junction with barrier layer made of Cu or Cu0.47Ni0.53 alloy.

    A cost-effective way is applied to fabricate the sputtered NixPt1-x thin films with controllable Ni concentration. 3D Focused Ion Beam (FIB) sculpturing is used to fabricate Nb-Pt1-xNix-Nb Josephson junctions. The planar junctions are made by cutting Cu-Nb or CuNi-Nb double layer by FIB.

    Magnetic properties of PtNi thin films are studied via the Hall effect. It is found that films with sub-critical Ni concentration are superparamagnetic at low temperatures and exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Films with over-critical Ni concentration are ferromagnetic with parallel anisotropy. At the critical concentration the films demonstrate canted magnetization with the easy axis rotating as a function of temperature. The magnetism appears via two consecutive crossovers, going from paramagnetic to superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic, and the extraordinary Hall effect changes sign at low temperatures.

    Detailed studies of superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor Josephson junctions are carried out depending on the size of junction, thickness and composition of the ferromagnetic layer. The junction critical current density decreases non-monotonically with increasing Ni concentration. It has a minimum at ~ 40 at.% of Ni which indicates a switching into the π state.

    The fabricated junctions are used as phase sensitive detectors for analysis of vortex states in mesoscopic superconductors. It is found that the vortex induces different flux shifts, in the measured Fraunhofer modulation of the Josephson critical current, depending on the position of the vortex. When the vortex is close to the junction it induces a flux shift equal to Φ0/2 leading to switching of the junction into the 0-π state. By changing the bias current at constant magnetic field the vortices can be manipulated and the system can be switched between two consecutive vortex states. A mesoscopic superconductor can thus act as a memory cell in which the junction is used both for reading and writing information (vortex).

  • 42.
    Golod, Taras
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Frederiksen, Henrik
    Krasnov, Vladimir M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nb-PtNi-Nb Josephson junctions made by 3D FIB nano-sculpturing2009In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 150, no 5, p. 052062-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use Focused Ion Beam (FIB) for fabrication of nano-scale Superconductor-Ferromagnet-Superconductor (SFS) Josephson junctions, aiming to achieve a uniform, mono-domain state in the F-layer within the junction. We employ a Pt1-xNix alloy, characterized by the perfect solubility of the two components, for obtaining a homogeneous diluted ferromagnet. We perform a systematic analysis of both chemical composition, and ferromagnetic properties of Pt1—xNix thin films for different Ni—concentrations. The nano-scale homogeneity of the Pt1—xNix films is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The Curie temperature of Pt1—xNix films decreases in a non-linear manner with Ni concentration. We observe that the critical current density of NbPt1—xNixNb junctions decreases non-monotonously with increasing Ni-concentration: at x 30% it exhibits a minimum, which we attribute to switching into the π state as a function of Ni-concentration.

  • 43.
    Golod, Taras
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rydh, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Krasnov, Vladimir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Detection of the Phase Shift from a Single Abrikosov Vortex2010In: Physical Review D. Particles and fields, ISSN 0556-2821, E-ISSN 1089-4918, Vol. 104, p. 227003-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We probe a quantum mechanical phase rotation induced by a single Abrikosov vortex in a superconducting lead, using a Josephson junction, made at the edge of the lead, as a phase-sensitive detector. We observe that the vortex induces a Josephson phase shift equal to the polar angle of the vortex within the junction length. When the vortex is close to the junction it induces a π step in the Josephson phase difference, leading to a controllable and reversible switching of the junction into the 0-π state. This in turn results in an unusual Φ0/2 quantization of the flux in the junction. The vortex may hence act as a tunable “phase battery” for quantum electronics.

  • 44.
    Golod, Taras
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rydh, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Krasnov, Vladimir M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Anomalous Hall effect in NiPt thin films2011In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 033909-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study Hall effect in sputtered NixPt1-x thin films with different Ni concentrations. Temperature, magnetic field andangular dependencies are analyzed and the phase diagram of NiPt thin films is obtained. It is found that films with sub-critical Ni concentration exhibit cluster-glass behavior at low temperatures with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy below the freezing temperature. Films with super-critical Ni concentration are ferromagnetic with parallel anisotropy. At the critical concentration the state of the film is strongly frustrated. Such films demonstrate canted magnetization with the easy axis rotating as a function of temperature. The magnetism appears via consecutive paramagnetic - cluster glass - ferromagnetic transitions, rather than a single second-order phase transition. But most remarkably, the extraordinary Hall effect changes sign at the critical concentration. We suggest that this is associated with a reconstruction of the electronic structure of the alloy at the normal metal - ferromagnet quantum phase transition.

  • 45.
    Golod, Taras
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rydh, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Krasnov, Vladimir M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Anti-ordinary Hall effect near the ferromagnetic quantum phase transition in NixPt1-x thin films2013In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 87, no 10, p. 104407-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the Hall effect in NixPt1-x thin films. It is observed that the ordinary Hall coefficient is always negative (electron-like). The anomalous Hall coefficient is also negative, except in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic quantum phase transition, where it exhibits a sign reversal and turns positive (hole-like). This leads to an anti-ordinary Hall effect with opposite signs of ordinary and anomalous contributions. It clearly shows that the anomalous Hall effect does not reflect the overall topology of the Fermi surface (which remains unchanged), but originates from singular hot spots. We attribute the anti-ordinary contribution to the intrinsic (Berry-phase) origin and propose a spectroscopic explanation of its tunability as a function of temperature and composition. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.104407

  • 46. Hauser, K
    et al.
    Barth, A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Side-Chain Protonation and Mobility in the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: Implications for Proton Countertransport and Ca2+ Release.2007In: Biophys J, ISSN 0006-3495, Vol. 93, no 9, p. 3259-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protonation of acidic residues in the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA 1a) was studied by multiconformation continuum electrostatic calculations in the Ca(2+)-bound state Ca(2)E1, in the Ca(2+)-free state E2(TG) with bound thapsigargin, and in the E2P (ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme) analog state with MgF(4)(2-) E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)). Around physiological pH, all acidic Ca(2+) ligands (Glu(309), Glu(771), Asp(800), and Glu(908)) were unprotonated in Ca(2)E1; in E2(TG) and E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)) Glu(771), Asp(800), and Glu(908) were protonated. Glu(771) and Glu(908) had calculated pK(a) values larger than 14 in E2(TG) and E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)), whereas Asp(800) titrated with calculated pK(a) values near 7.5. Glu(309) had very different pK(a) values in the Ca(2+)-free states: 8.4 in E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)) and 4.7 in E2(TG) because of a different local backbone conformation. This indicates that Glu(309) can switch between a high and a low pK(a) mode, depending on the local backbone conformation. Protonated Glu(309) occupied predominantly two main, very differently orientated side-chain conformations in E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)): one oriented inward toward the other Ca(2+) ligands and one oriented outward toward a protein channel that seems to be in contact with the cytoplasm. Upon deprotonation, Glu(309) adopted completely the outwardly orientated side-chain conformation. The contact of Glu(309) with the cytoplasm in E2(TG+MgF(4)(2-)) makes this residue unlikely to bind lumenal protons. Instead it might serve as a proton shuttle between Ca(2+)-binding site I and the cytoplasm. Glu(771), Asp(800), and Glu(908) are proposed to take part in proton countertransport.

  • 47.
    Hermanns, M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bergholtz, E.J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hansson, T.H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Karlhede, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Suorsa, J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    FQHE-the solvable limit and beyond2008In: Bulletin of the American Physical Society, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider the quantum Hall system in the torus geometry. In the limit where the torus becomes thin, the problem is exactly solvable and the hierarchy of quantum Hall states is manifest. Explicit wave functions for a large set of them are constructed with help of conformal field theory. This construction provides a continuation from the exactly solvable limit to the experimental regime. Numerical results on 4/11 supports this picture.

  • 48.
    Hermanns, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Quasielectrons in Abelian and non-Abelian Quantum Hall States2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Strongly correlated electron systems continue to  attract a lot of interest. Especially two-dimensional electron systems have shown many surprising behaviours. A fascinating example is the quantum Hall effect, which arises when electrons are confined to two dimensions, subjected to a very large magnetic field, and cooled to very low temperatures. Under these conditions, the electrons form new states of matter - the strongly correlated quantum Hall liquids. A hallmark of these quantum liquids is the precise quantization of the Hall conductance, but in recent years more attention has been focused on their exotic excitations. These have fractional electric charge, and fractional exchange statistics. The latter implies that the wave function is multiplied by a phase factor containing a fractional phase when two quasiparticles are moved around each other. Thus, they are neither bosons nor fermions, but so-called anyons. In recent years, there has accumulated theoretical and experimental evidence  for some of the quantum Hall liquids having even more exotic excitations with not only fractional but non-Abelian exchange statistics. The quasiparticles of such systems could be used to build topologically protected quantum bits, which are much more robust than presently available quantum bits; they would be the ideal building blocks of a quantum computer.

     We use conformal field theory to describe the quantum Hall liquids, as well as their excitations. In particular, we represent the electrons and quasiparticles by conformal field theory operators. Even though the operator description for quasiholes is very well understood, it was for a long time unclear how to describe their antiparticles, the quasielectrons. We found an operator  that describes quasielectron excitations correctly and shares many of the useful properties of the corresponding quasihole operator. For instance, many of the topological properties of the particles are manifest in the operator. This not only adds a missing piece to the quantum Hall puzzle,  but it also opens up new and exciting possibilities. For instance, we were able to extend this construction to the non-Abelian states. A highly non-trivial application of our approach is the condensation of non-Abelian quasielectrons, which yields new non-Abelian quantum Hall states with non-Abelian properties that differ from those of their parent states.

  • 49.
    Hutter, Carsten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Tholen, Erik A.
    Stannigel, Kai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Lidmar, Jack
    Haviland, David B.
    Josephson junction transmission lines as tunable artificial crystals2011In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 014511-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate one-dimensional Josephson junction arrays with generalized unit cells as a circuit approach to engineer microwave band gaps. An array described by a lattice with a basis can be designed to have a gap in the electromagnetic spectrum, in full analogy to electronic band gaps in diatomic or many-atomic crystals. We derive the dependence of this gap on the array parameters in the linear regime and suggest experimentally feasible designs to bring the gap below the single-junction plasma frequency. The gap can be tuned in a wide frequency range by applying external flux, and it persists in the presence of small imperfections.

  • 50.
    Häger, Wille
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Medical Radiation Physics (together with KI).
    Characterization of fading effects of a MOSFET semiconductor dosimeter to be used on an X-ray laser2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the European XFEL, electrons bunches are accelerated up to 20 GeV and thenenter undulators where coherent X-rays are produced which can be used for imaging atva molecular level. Electrons may stray from the path and hit the permanent magnets inthe undulators. It is well known that ionizing radiation can affect the magnetic characteristics of permanent magnets. The undulators are therefore equipped with a type of semiconductor dosimeters, RADFETs, so that the potential damage from ionizing radiation to the magnets can be measured and corrected for. It is also known that heat will be generated from air-coils in the accelerator which can change the ambient temperature around the dosimeters up to 25 K. All semiconductor technology is highly susceptible totemperature. This report investigates the fading characteristics of the RADFET under different temperatures and times after irradiation. It also investigates the dose responseunder dierent temperatures and estimates the magnitude of errors in measured dose which can be expected if temperatures are not accounted for. It is seen that a delta T of a few K can have a large impact on RADFETs' ability to both record and retain dose. A strong time dependence is also seen. The fading is the largest during irradiation andthen slows down exponentially, stabilizing after 1 to 2 months. An increase from 20 deg C to 26 deg C will increase the fading by 2 Gy/h during irradiation, and 0.015 Gy/h weeks afterirradiation. It is estimated that dose measurements at XFEL can have errors of up to 14% if long-term fading is not accounted for. A model for estimating long-term fading as a function of temperature is proposed.

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