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  • 1. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh
    Skripkin, Mikhail Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Potassium ion-mediated non-covalent bonded coordination polymers2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 3, 850-859 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystal structures and vibrational spectra of three related network-forming coordination complexes have been studied. Two novel thermodynamically stable pseudo-polymorphic solvated rhodium chloro compounds, [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K](n), 1, and [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 3H(2)O](n), 2, and one metastable compound [trans-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 0.25H(2)O](n), 3, crystallize at ambient temperature in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1, and the monoclinic space groups P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c for 2 and 3, respectively. All three structures contain [RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)]-complexes in which the rhodium(III) ions bind to two dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sulfur atoms and four chloride ions in distorted octahedral coordination geometries. The complexes are connected in networks via potassium ions interacting with the Cl- and the DMSO oxygen atoms. As the sum of Shannon ionic radii of K+ and Cl- exceeds the K-Cl distances in compounds under study, these compounds can be described as Rh-Cl-K coordination polymers with non-covalent bonding, which is not common in these systems, forming 1- and 2-D networks for 1/2 and 3, respectively. The 2-D network with nano-layered sheets for compound 3 was also confirmed by TEM images. Further evaluation of the bonding in the cis- and trans-[RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)](-) entities was obtained by recording Raman and FT-IR absorption spectra and assigning the vibrational frequencies with the support of force-field calculations. The force field study of complexes reveals the strong domination of trans-effect (DMSO-kappa S > Cl) over the effect of non-covalent bonding in coordination polymeric structures. The comparison of calculated RhCl, RhS and SO stretching force constants showed evidence of K+-ligand interactions whereas direct experimental evidences of K+-Cl- interaction were not obtained because of strong overlap of the corresponding spectral region with that where lattice modes and Rh-ligand bendings appear.

  • 2. Adolfsson, Erik
    et al.
    Shen, Zhijian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Effects of granule density on strength and granule related defects in zirconia2012In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, Vol. 32, no 11, 2653-2659 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A suspension of zirconia powder (TZ3YSE) with a solids loading of 50 vol% was prepared by ball milling. Binders were added and some of the suspension was diluted to 40, 30 and 20 vol% before freeze granulation was performed. A spray dried material (TZ3YSEB) was used as a reference. The pore size distribution of the different granules was evaluated and from the microstructure it was shown that inhomogeneities were present in both the freeze granulated as well as in the spray dried granules. In addition, the density, microstructure as well as the strength of sintered materials prepared from the granules were studied. The results showed that a high green density or sintered density was not sufficient in order to achieve a high strength material. It was further shown that the strength was significantly influenced by the granule density and not by the inhomogeneities found in the granules.

  • 3.
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Crystallization on the Mesoscale: Self-Assembly of Iron Oxide Nanocubes into Mesocrystals2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles is a promising route to form complex, nanostructured materials with functional properties. Nanoparticle assemblies characterized by a crystallographic alignment of the nanoparticles on the atomic scale, i.e. mesocrystals, are commonly found in nature with outstanding functional and mechanical properties. This thesis aims to investigate and understand the formation mechanisms of mesocrystals formed by self-assembling iron oxide nanocubes.

    We have used the thermal decomposition method to synthesize monodisperse, oleate-capped iron oxide nanocubes with average edge lengths between 7 nm and 12 nm and studied the evaporation-induced self-assembly in dilute toluene-based nanocube dispersions. The influence of packing constraints on the alignment of the nanocubes in nanofluidic containers has been investigated with small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively). We found that the nanocubes preferentially orient one of their {100} faces with the confining channel wall and display mesocrystalline alignment irrespective of the channel widths. 

    We manipulated the solvent evaporation rate of drop-cast dispersions on fluorosilane-functionalized silica substrates in a custom-designed cell. The growth stages of the assembly process were investigated using light microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). We found that particle transport phenomena, e.g. the coffee ring effect and Marangoni flow, result in complex-shaped arrays near the three-phase contact line of a drying colloidal drop when the nitrogen flow rate is high. Diffusion-driven nanoparticle assembly into large mesocrystals with a well-defined morphology dominates at much lower nitrogen flow rates. Analysis of the time-resolved video microscopy data was used to quantify the mesocrystal growth and establish a particle diffusion-based, three-dimensional growth model. The dissipation obtained from the QCM-D signal reached its maximum value when the microscopy-observed lateral growth of the mesocrystals ceased, which we address to the fluid-like behavior of the mesocrystals and their weak binding to the substrate. Analysis of electron microscopy images and diffraction patterns showed that the formed arrays display significant nanoparticle ordering, regardless of the distinctive formation process. 

    We followed the two-stage formation mechanism of mesocrystals in levitating colloidal drops with real-time SAXS. Modelling of the SAXS data with the square-well potential together with calculations of van der Waals interactions suggests that the nanocubes initially form disordered clusters, which quickly transform into an ordered phase.

  • 4.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Høydalsvik, Kristin
    Mayence, Arnaud
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Karvinen, Petri
    Liebi, Marianne
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nygård, Kim
    Controlling Orientational and Translational Order of Iron Oxide Nanocubes by Assembly in Nanofluidic Containers2015In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 31, no 45, 12537-12543 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate that spatial confinement can be used to control the orientational and translational order of cubic nanoparticles. For this purpose we have combined X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to study the ordering of iron oxide nanocubes that have self-assembled from toluene-based dispersions in nanofluidic channels. An analysis of scattering vector components with directions parallel and perpendicular to the slit walls shows that the confining walls induce a preferential parallel alignment of the nanocube (100) faces. Moreover, slit wall separations that are commensurate with an integer multiple of the edge length of the oleic acid-capped nanocubes result in a more pronounced translational order of the self-assembled arrays compared to incommensurate confinement. These results show that the confined assembly of anisotropic nanocrystals is a promising route to nanoscale devices with tunable anisotropic properties.

  • 5.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Following the mesocrystal growth of self-assembling iron oxide nanocubes by video microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Andersson, Linnéa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Keshavarzi, Neda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Colloidal processing and CO2 capture performance of sacrificially templated zeolite monoliths2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 97, 289-296 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sacrificial templating of suspension cast and subsequently thermally treated zeolite monoliths with glassy carbon spheres and fibers yielded zeolite 13X and silicalite-1 monoliths with macroporosities up to 50 vol%. Homogeneous distribution of the macroporosity in hierarchically porous monoliths was obtained by tailoring the surface chemistry of the carbon particles by polyelectrolyte-assisted adsorption of zeolite particles. The effect of amount of kaolin binder and temperature for the thermal treatment on the monoliths strength, surface area and CO2 uptake was studied by diametral compression tests, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption. Cyclic adsorption and regeneration measurements showed that zeolite 13X monoliths display a high CO2 uptake while the silicalite-1 monoliths could be regenerated with a relatively low energy penalty.

  • 7.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Keshavarzi, Neda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Shakarova, Dilshod
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Cheung, Ocean
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Aluminophosphate monoliths with high CO2-over-N2 selectivity and CO2 capture capacity2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 99, 55877-55883 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monoliths of microporous aluminophosphates (AlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53) were structured by binder-freepulsed current processing. Such monoliths could be important for carbon capture from flue gas. TheAlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53 monoliths exhibited a tensile strength of 1.0 MPa and a CO2 adsorption capacityof 2.5 mmol g1 and 1.6 mmol g1, respectively at 101 kPa and 0 C. Analyses of single component CO2and N2 adsorption data indicated that the AlPO4-53 monoliths had an extraordinarily high CO2-over-N2selectivity from a binary gas mixture of 15 mol% CO2 and 85 mol% N2. The estimated CO2 capturecapacity of AlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53 monoliths in a typical pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process at 20C was higher than that of the commonly used zeolite 13X granules. Under cyclic sorption conditions,AlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53 monoliths were regenerated by lowering the pressure of CO2. Regeneration wasdone without application of heat, which would regenerate them to their full capacity for CO2 adsorption.

  • 8.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ojuva, Arto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wirawan, Sang Kompiang
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hierarchically porous binder-free silicalite-1 discs: a novel support for all-zeolite membranes2011In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 21, no 24, 8822-8828 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal expansion mismatch between the zeolite film and the support is an important cause for the formation of defects and cracks during the fabrication and use of zeolite membranes. We have studied how silicalite-1 discs with a permeability comparable to commercially available alumina supports can be produced by pulsed current processing (PCP) as a novel substrate for all-zeolite membranes. Hierarchically porous and mechanically strong membrane supports where the surface area and crystallography of the silicalite-1 particles were maintained could be obtained by carefully controlling the thermal treatment during PCP consolidation. In situ X-ray diffraction and dilatometry showed that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the silicalite-1 substrate was negative in the temperature range 200-800 degrees C while the commonly used alumina substrate displayed a positive CTE. The critical temperature variation, Delta T, and thicknesses for crack-free supported zeolite films with a negative CTE were estimated using a fracture energy model. Zeolite films with a thickness of 1 mu m can only sustain a relatively modest Delta T of 100 degrees when supported onto alumina substrates while the all-zeolite membranes can support temperature variations above 500 degrees.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Linnéa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Akhtar, Farid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ojuva, Arto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Colloidal processing and CO2-capture performance of hierarchically porous Al2O3-zeolite 13X composites2012In: Journal of Ceramic Science and Technology, ISSN 2190-9385, Vol. 3, no 1, 9-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchically porous composites for CO2-capture have been produced by coating the inner walls of foam-like macroporous alumina monoliths, produced by templated synthesis, with microporous zeolite 13X particles. Homogeneous and dense coatings of the particulate adsorbent were obtained when the impregnation process was performed at a pH above 9. At this pH-level the colloidally stable suspensions of the negatively charged zeolite 13X particles could fill all the voids of the highly connected pore space of the alumina supports and attach to the monolith walls, which had been pre-coated with poly(ethylene imine). A CO2-uptake as high as 5 mmol CO2/g zeolite 13X was achieved for alumina-zeolite 13X composites through minimisation of the added inorganic binder, kaolin, to only 3.0 wt% with respect to zeolite content, and through optimisation of the thermal treatment.

  • 10. Aristov, Maria
    et al.
    Eichhorn, Ralf
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Bechinger, Clemens
    Separation of chiral colloidal particles in a helical flow field2013In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 9, no 8, 2525-2530 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereoisomeric molecules with opposite chirality, so-called enantiomers, often vary regarding their sensory, pharmacological and toxicological properties. Such enantiomer specific effects play a central role in the development, testing and evaluation of drugs, pesticides and food related products. Accordingly, efficient techniques for separation of chiral mixtures into enantiopure compounds are of enormous practical relevance. Most current enantiomer separation methods are based on enantioselective interactions with an auxiliary substance which has to be developed and optimized for different chiral molecules in an elaborate and costly process. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the separation of micron-sized chiral particles in a helical fluid flow which is created inside a microfluidic device patterned with slanted grooves. We observe that the retention time of particles in a helical flow field strongly depends on their chirality which leads to an effective chiral separation within the channel. Our experimental results are confirmed by numerical calculations which demonstrate how the coupling of rotational and translational degrees of freedom leads to differences in the trajectories of particles with opposite chirality. Since our separation mechanism does not rely on material specific interactions, this offers considerable advantages over existing methods. We expect that our approach can be also applied at nanometre length scales by using channels with smaller diameters and with an optimized geometry.

  • 11. Asahina, Shunsuke
    et al.
    Uno, Shinobu
    Suga, Mitsuo
    Stevens, Sam
    Klingstedt, Miia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Okano, Yasuyuki
    Kudo, Masato
    Schuth, Ferdi
    Anderson, Michael
    Adschiri, Tadafumi
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    A new HRSEM approach to observe fine structures of novel nanostructured materials2011In: Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, ISSN 1387-1811, Vol. 146, no 1-3, 11-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new approach for observing fine structures of novel thin, nanostructured materials called through the employed to observe interesting features on a variety of new, catalyticallyimportant hierarchically porous rattlespheres.

  • 12. Atluri, Rambabu
    et al.
    Iqbal, Muhammad Naeem
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Villaescusa, Luis Angel
    Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry. alfonso@mmk.su.se.
    Self-Assembly Mechanism of Folate-Templated Mesoporous Silica2013In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 29, no 38, 12003-12012 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to form ordered mesoporous silica based on the use of folate supramolecular templates has been developed. Evidence based on in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and in situ conductivity measurements are used to investigate the organic inorganic interactions and synthesis mechanism. The behavior of folate molecules in solution differs distinctively from that of surfactants commonly used for the preparation of ordered mesoporous silica phases, notably with the absence of a critical micellar concentration. In situ SAXS studies reveal fluctuations in X-ray scattering intensities consistent with the condensation of the silica precursor surrounding the folate template and the growth of the silica mesostructure in the initial stages. High-angle X-ray diffraction shows that the folate template is well-ordered within the pores even after a few minutes of synthesis. Direct structural data for the self-assembly of folates into chiral tetramers within the pores of mesoporous silica provide evidence for the in register stacking of folate tetramers, resulting in a chiral surface of rotated tetramers, with a rotation angle of 30 degrees. Additionally, the self-assembled folates within pores were capable of adsorbing a considerable amount of CO2 gas through the cavity space of the tetramers. The study demonstrates the validity of using a naturally occurring template to produce relevant and functional mesoporous materials.

  • 13. Avila, M.
    et al.
    Burks, T.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gothelid, M.
    Lansaker, P. C.
    Toprak, M. S.
    Muhammed, M.
    Uheida, A.
    Surface functionalized nanofibers for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions2014In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, Vol. 245, 201-209 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers functionalized with amine groups (PAN-NH2) were prepared using a simple one-step reaction route. The PAN-NH2 nanofibers were investigated for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption and the kinetic characteristics were evaluated in batch process. The adsorption process showed pH dependence and the maximum Cr(VI) adsorption occurred at pH = 2. The Langmuir adsorption model described well the experimental adsorption data and estimated a maximum loading capacity of 156 mg/g, which is a markedly high value compared to other adsorbents reported. The kinetics studies indicated that the equilibrium was attained after 90 min and the experimental data followed a pseudo-second order model suggesting a chemisorption process as the rate limiting step. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) revealed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) species on PAN-NH2 was facilitated through both electrostatic attraction and surface complexation. High desorption efficiency (> 90%) of Cr(VI) was achieved using diluted base solutions that may allow the reuse of PAN-NH2 nanofibers.

  • 14.
    Aziz, Baroz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Synthesis and modification of potential CO2 adsorbents: Amine modified silica and calcium carbonates2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The prospect of rapid changes to the climate due to global warming is subject of public concern. The need to reduce the emissions of atmospheric green house gases and in particular carbon dioxide is greater than ever. Extensive research is performed to find new solutions and new materials, which tackles this problem in economically benign way. This thesis dealt with two potential adsorbents for post combustion  carbon capture, namely, amine modified silica and calcium carbonates. We modified porous silica with large surface area by propyl-amine groups to enhance the carbon dioxide adsorption capacity and selectivity. Experimental parameters, such as reaction time, temperature, water content, acid and heat treatment of silica substrate were optimized using a fractional factorial design. Adsorption properties and the nature of formed species upon reaction of CO2 and amine-modified silica were studied by sorption and infrared spectroscopy. Physisorbed and chemisorbed amount of adsorbed CO2 were, for the first time, estimated directly in an accurate way. The effects of temperature and moisture on the CO2 adsorption properties were also studied.

    Crystallization of calcium carbonate as a precursor to calcium oxide, which can be used as carbon dioxide absorbent, was studied in the second part of this thesis. Structure of different amorphous phases of calcium carbonate was studied in detail. Crystallization of calcium carbonate with and without additives was studied. Parameters like stirring rate, temperature, pH and polymer concentration showed to be important in selection of phase and morphology. An aggregation mediated crystallization was postulated to explain the observed morphologies. 

  • 15.
    Aziz, Baroz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gebauer, Denis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kinetic control of particle-mediated calcium carbonate crystallization2011In: CrysteEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 13, no 14, 4641-4645 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By changing the temperature, pH, stirring rate, or time for calcium carbonate crystallization, complex shapes of aggregated calcium carbonates formed. Such shapes have earlier been ascribed to specific interactions with specialized additives. Without polymeric additives, aggregates of vaterite transformed more rapidly into calcite aggregates under slow than under fast stirring. With an anionic polyelectrolyte added, vaterite was stabilized. Larger polycrystalline aggregates of vaterite formed under rapid than under slow stirring, indicative of a particle mediated growth of aggregates controlled by convective currents. The size of the underlying nanoparticles was temperature dependent, with grain sizes of similar to 20 to 50 nm at 20 degrees C and similar to 350 nm at 90 degrees C. The small differences in free energy between the anhydrous polymorphs of calcium carbonate made both kinetic and equilibrium dependencies important.

  • 16.
    Aziz, Baroz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Bacsik, Zoltán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Quantification of chemisorption and physisorption of carbon dioxide on porous silica modified by propylamines: Effect of amine density2012In: Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, ISSN 1387-1811, Vol. 159, 42-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed molecular aspects of carbon dioxide sorption on porous silica with different amounts of tethered and cross-linked n-propylamine groups were investigated. Infrared spectroscopy was applied to directly quantify physisorbed and chemisorbed CO2 on the amine modified silicas. The fractions of physisorbed CO2 and various chemisorbed species were determined as functions of CO2 pressure and the amine density on the modified silica. Physisorbed CO2 was a minor portion of the total CO2 uptake at low pressures, but it’s contribution increased to ∼35% at 1 bar of CO2 when the propylamine surface density was low or medium (0.87-1.67 NH2/nm2). Chemisorption of CO2 dominated when the propylamine content was high (2.74 NH2/nm2). The quantities of propylammonium propylcarbamate ion pairs increased with increasing propylamine content. At low or medium amine surface densities (0.87-1.67 NH2/nm2) this increase was approximately proportional to the amine density, but the quantity of ion pairs increased very significantly when the propylamine content was high (2.74 NH2/nm2). This dependency on amine density is consistent with the idea that a sufficiently close proximity of propylamine groups allows a formation of ion pairs. The relative fractions of carbamic acid and silylpropylcarbamate were significant for materials on which ion pairs could not form. Furthermore, the quantities of carbamic acid increased with increasing amine densities suggesting that the ion pairs have a role to stabilize the labile carbamic acid through hydrogen bonds.

  • 17.
    Aziz, Baroz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zhao, Guoying
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Carbon Dioxide Sorbents with Propylamine Groups-Silica Functionalized with a Fractional Factorial Design Approach2011In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 27, no 7, 3822-3834 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous silica particles (Davisil) were functionalized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) in a fractional factorial design with 19 different synthesis and uptake experiments. The number of amino groups and the uptake of CO(2) were optimized in a 2(V)(5-1) design. Most important to functionalizationwas the amount of water present during synthesis, the reaction time, and pretreating the silica with a mineral acid; certain two-way interactions were shown to be statistically significant as well. Modifications performed at 110 or 80 degrees C showed no significant differences concerning amine content or uptake of CO(2). Properly choosing center points for the discrete variables is problematic and is somewhat related to the lack of fit with respect to CO(2) uptake; the regression was good. Solid-state (29)Si NMR showed that the APTES was mainly fully condensed. Specific surface areas did not correlate with the number of n-propylamine groups on the silica, which is indicative of differential levels of heterogeneity in the coverage of propylamines. The uptake of CO(2) and N(2) was measured from -20 to 70 degrees C and from 0 to 1 bar and parametrized by the Freundlich isotherm. Amine-modified silica adsorbed significant amounts of CO(2), especially at the low partial pressure, which is important for CO(2) capture from flue gas. At such pressures, samples with a high density of amine (4 amines/nm(2)) showed a much higher uptake of CO(2) than did those with densities of similar to 2-3 amines/nm(2), reflecting differential tendencies to form propylammonium-propylcarbamate ion pairs; these require close proximity among amine groups to form. Water affected the uptake of carbon dioxide in different ways. Certain samples took up more moist CO(2) gas than dry CO(2), and others took up less moist CO(2) than dry CO(2), which is indicative of differential tendencies toward water adsorption. We conclude that experimental design is a time-efficient approach to the functionalization of silica with propylamine groups.

  • 18.
    Biendicho, Jordi Jacas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, England.
    Shafeie, Samrand
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Frenck, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Pierre & Marie Curie University, France.
    Gavrilova, Daria
    Böhme, Solveigh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany.
    Bettanini, A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Universita Ca Foscari Venezia, Italy.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Hull, Steve
    Zhe, Zhao
    Istomin, S. Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Grins, Jekabs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Svensson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Synthesis and characterisation of perovskite SrxY1-xFeO3-d (=.63≤x<1) and Sr0.75Y0.25Fe1-yMyO3-d (M=Cr, Mn, Ni) (y= 0.2, 0.33, 0.5)2013In: Journal of Solid State Chemistry, ISSN 0022-4596, E-ISSN 1095-726X, Vol. 200, 30-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen-deficient ferrates with the cubic perovskite structure SrxY1-xFeO3-d were prepared in air (0.71 ≤ x ≤ 0.91) as well as in N2 (x=0.75 and 0.79) at 1573K. The oxygen content of the compounds prepared in air increases with increasing strontium content from 3-δ=2.79(2) for x=0.75 to 3-δ=2.83(2) for x=0.91. Refinement of the crystal structure of Sr0.75Y0.25FeO2.79 using TOF neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data shows high anisotropic atomic displacement parameter (ADP) for the oxygen atom resulting from a substantial cation and anion disorder. Electron diffraction (ED) and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) studies of Sr0.75Y0.25FeO2.79 reveal a modulation along <100>p with G± ~0.4<100>p indicating a local ordering of oxygen vacancies. Magnetic susceptibility measurements at 5-390K show spin-glass behaviour with dominating antiferromagnetic coupling between the magnetic moments of Fe cations. Among the studied compositions, Sr0.75Y0.25FeO2.79 shows the lowest thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of 10.5 ppm K-1 in air at 298-673K. At 773-1173K TEC increases up to 17.2 ppm K-1 due to substantial reduction of oxygen content. The latter also results in a dramatic decrease of the electrical conductivity in air above 673K. Partial substitution of Fe by Cr, Mn and Ni according to the formula Sr0.75Y0.25Fe1-yMyO3-δ (y=0.2, 0.33, 0.5) leads to cubic perovskites for all substituents with y=0.2. Their TECs are higher in comparison with un-doped Sr0.75Y0.25FeO2.79. Only M=Ni has increased electrical conductivity compared to un-doped Sr0.75Y0.25FeO2.79.

  • 19.
    Bogár, Krisztián
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Krumlinde, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bacsik, Zoltán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Heterogenized Wilkinson's Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds2011In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 23, 4409-4414 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wilkinson’s catalyst [RhCl(PPh3)3] was heterogenized on common silica by the use of a grafting/anchoring technique. The immobilized catalyst showed high activity and selectivity in transfer hydrogenation reactions of a range of carbonyl compounds in 2-propanol. Reactions carried out in 2-propanol at reflux afforded the corresponding alcohols in high yields in short reaction times. The heterogeneous feature ofthe catalyst allows for easy recovery and efficient reuse in the same reaction up to 5 times without any detectible loss of catalytic activity.

  • 20. Brunatova, Ereza
    et al.
    Matej, Zdenek
    Oleynikov, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vesely, Josef
    Danis, Stanislav
    Popelkova, Daniela
    Kuzel, Radomir
    Thermal stability of titanate nanorods and titania nanowires formed from titanate nanotubes by heating2014In: Materials Characterization, ISSN 1044-5803, E-ISSN 1873-4189, Vol. 98, 26-36 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of titanate nanowires was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and 3D precession electron diffraction. Titania nanowires and titanate nanorods were prepared by heating of titanate nanotubes. The structure of final product depended on heating conditions. Titanium nanotubes heated in air at a temperature of 850 degrees C decomposed into three phases Na2Ti6O13 (nanorods) and two phases of TiO2 anatase and rutile. At higher temperatures the anatase form of TiO2 transforms into rutile and the nanorods change into rutile nanoparticles. By contrast, in the vacuum only anatase phases of TiO2 were obtained by heating at 900 degrees C. The anatase transformation into ruffle began only after a longer time of heating at 1000 degrees C. For the description of anisotropic XRD line broadening in the total powder pattern fitting by the program MSTRUCT a model of nanorods with elliptical base was included in the software. The model parameters rod length, axis size of the elliptical base, the ellipse flattening parameter and twist of the base could be refined. Variation of particle shapes with temperature was found.

  • 21. Brunatova, Tereza
    et al.
    Popelkova, Daniela
    Wan, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Oleynikov, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Danis, Stanislav
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kuzel, Radomir
    Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy2014In: Materials Characterization, ISSN 1044-5803, E-ISSN 1873-4189, Vol. 87, 166-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H2Ti2O5 center dot H2O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved.

  • 22. Burks, T.
    et al.
    Avila, M.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gothelid, M.
    Lansaker, P. C.
    Toprak, M. S.
    Muhammed, M.
    Uheida, A.
    Studies on the adsorption of chromium(VI) onto 3-Mercaptopropionic acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles2014In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 425, 36-43 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromium (Cr) in the form of Cr(VI) is deemed toxic in water due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. For the successful removal of Cr(VI), we demonstrate a novel adsorbent consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) functionalized with 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the functionalization of nanoparticles and presence of sulfonate groups. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the functionalized adsorbent recovered 45 mg of Cr(VI)/g of 3-MPA coated SPION at initial concentration of 50 mg/L aqueous solution at pH 1 with less than 1% of Fe dissolution from SPION. The results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that Cr(VI) chemisorbed onto the adsorbent. Hence, the XPS spectra did not indicate any reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) upon adsorption. The adsorption data were better fitted for the Freundlich model. Moreover, the Cr(VI) adsorption kinetics on functionalized SPION followed a pseudo-second order rate, revealing chemisorption as the dominant mechanism. The high Cr(VI) removal, rapid adsorption kinetics and stability of adsorbent indicate that 3-MPA coated SPION could be an efficient adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI).

  • 23. Buxhuku, Mika
    et al.
    Hansen, Vidar
    Oleynikov, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Gjonnes, Jon
    The Determination of Rotation Axis in the Rotation Electron Diffraction Technique2013In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 19, no 5, 1276-1280 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods to determine the rotation axis using the rotation electron diffraction technique are described. A combination of rotation axis tilt, beam tilt, and simulated experimental diffraction patterns with nonintegers zone axis has been used. Accurate knowledge of the crystallographic direction of the incident beam for deducing the excitation error of reflections simultaneously near Bragg positions is essential in quantitative electron diffraction. Experimental patterns from CoP3 are used as examples.

  • 24. Candelario, Victor M.
    et al.
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    Shen, Zhijian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Guiberteau, Fernando
    Ortiz, Angel L.
    Liquid-phase assisted spark-plasma sintering of SiC nanoceramics and their nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes2017In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 37, no 5, 1929-1936 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The appropriate conditions for liquid-phase assisted spark-plasma sintering (SPS) were identified for the fabrication of both SiC nanoceramics and their nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A parametric study of the nanoceramics and nanocomposites with a given type of CNTs showed that the SPS temperature (as measured by the radial optical pyrometer) optimizing their densification, nanograin size, and mechanical properties is 1700 degrees C (soaking for a few minutes), below which there is incomplete densification, and above which there is obvious grain growth with no benefit in hardness or toughness in the case of the nanoceramics, and prejudicial to both properties in the case of the nanocomposites due to the CNT degradation. It was also shown that the nanocomposites have smaller nanograins than their nanoceramic counterparts, and are softer but tougher. Extension to nanocomposites with different types of CNTs confirmed these trends, and showed that the CNT features do not condition the densification, microstructure or mechanical properties of these nanocomposites.

  • 25.
    Cantillana, Tatiana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Sundström, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Synthesis of 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chloro-3-thiophenol)-1,1-dichloroethene (3-SH-DDE) via Newman-Kwart rearrangement - A precursor for synthesis of radiolabeled and unlabeled alkylsulfonyl-DDEs2009In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, ISSN 0045-6535, Vol. 76, no 6, 805-810 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time, a pathway for synthesis of 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chloro-3-thiophenol)-1,1-dichloroethene (3-SH-DDE), is presented. The compound is of particular interest as a precursor for synthesis of alkylsulfonyl-DDE containing different alkyl groups to discover structural activity relationships, and to promote synthesis of radiolabeled methylsulfonyl-DDE. 2-Chloro-5-methyl phenol was first methylated and further oxidized to the corresponding benzoic acid. The acid was reduced to the corresponding aldehyde (4-chloro-3-methoxy benzaldehyde) via 4-chloro-3-methoxy-benzene methanol. A lead/aluminium bimetal system was used to carry out the reductive addition of tetrachloromethane to 4-chloro-3-methoxy benzaldehyde to obtain 2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chloro-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanol,the desired starting material to synthesize the DDT-analogue (2-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-chloro-3-methoxy-phenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane). Elimination of hydrochloric acid and removal of the methyl group led to the 3-OH-DDE. The Newman-Kwart rearrangement was applied to convert 3-OH-DDE to 3-SH-DDE via the dimethyl-carbarnothioate derivative. 3-SH-DDE is then used as a precursor for the radiolabel synthesis. The overall yield to acquire 3-SH-DDE after 11 steps was 3%. The step with the lowest yield was the DDT-analog synthesis with a yield of 30%. All other step had a yield of >50%. 3-SH-DDE was methylated with C-14-labeled iodomethane and oxidized by hydrogen peroxide to obtain 3-[C-14]MeSO2-DDE in an overall yield of 30%.

  • 26. Chaim, R.
    et al.
    Marder, R.
    Estournes, C.
    Shen, Zhijian James
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Densification and preservation of ceramic nanocrystalline character by spark plasma sintering2012In: Advances in Applied Ceramics: Structural, Functional and Bioceramics, ISSN 1743-6753, Vol. 111, no 5-6, 280-285 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spark plasma sintering is a hot pressing technique where rapid heating by dc electric pulses is used simultaneously with applied pressure. Thus, spark plasma sintering is highly suitable for rapid densification of ceramic nanoparticles and preservation of the final nanostructure. A considerable portion of the shrinkage during densification of the green compact of nanoparticles in the first and intermediate stages of sintering occurs during heating by particle rearrangement by sliding and rotation. Further densification to the final stage of sintering takes place by either plastic yield or diffusional processes. Full densification in the final stage of sintering is associated with diffusional processes only. Nanoparticle sliding and rotation during heating may also lead to grain coalescence, with much faster kinetics than normal grain growth at higher temperatures. Based on existing models for particle rearrangement and sliding, the contributions of these processes in conjunction with nanoparticle properties and process parameters were highlighted.

  • 27.
    Chen, Hong
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Deng, Youqian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Yu, Zhengbao
    Zhao, Huishuang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Yao, Qingxia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Junliang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    3D Open-Framework Vanadoborate as a Highly Effective Heterogeneous Pre-catalyst for the Oxidation of Alkylbenzenes2013In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 25, no 24, 5031-5036 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three three-dimensional (3D) open-framework vanadoborates, denoted as SUT-6-Zn, SUT-6-Mn, and SUT-6-Ni, were synthesized using diethylenetriamine as a template. SUT-6-Zn, SUT-6-Mn, and SUT-6-Ni are isostructural and built from (VO)(12)O-6 B18O36(OH)(6) clusters bridged by ZnO5, MnO6, and NiO6 polyhedra, respectively, to form the 3D frameworks. SUT-6 is the first vanadoborate with a 3D framework. The framework follows a semiregular hxg net topology with a 2-fold interpenetrated diamond-like channel system. The amount of template used in the synthesis played an important role in the dimensionality of the resulting vanadoborate structures. A small amount of diethylenetriamine led to the formation of this first 3D vanadoborate framework, while an increased amount of diethylenetriamine resulted in vanadoborates with zero-dimensional (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) structures. SUT-6-Zn was proved to be an efficient heterogeneous precatalyst for the oxidation of alkylbenzenes.

  • 28. Chen, Xiaozong
    et al.
    Liu, Leifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Dong, Yuan
    Wang, Lianjun
    Chen, Lidong
    Jiang, Wan
    Preparation of nano-sized Bi2Te3 thermoelectric material powders by cryogenic grinding2012In: Progress in Natural Science, ISSN 1002-0071, E-ISSN 1745-5391, Vol. 22, no 3, 201-206 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel method for rapid preparation of Bi2Te3 nano-sized powders with an average particle size of about 7nm was developed. A starting powder mixture consisting of Bi2Te3 coarse particles of similar to 5mm was ground using cryogenic grinding in the liquid nitrogen. For comparison, the conventional high-energy ball milling was used to prepare the Bi2Te3 nano-sized powders. Sintering properties of as-prepared powders was investigated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of the preparation procedure on the crystallinity, morphology and structure were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that Bi2Te3 was not transformed into a non-equilibrium amorphous phase or decomposed during the cryogenic grinding process, and as-prepared nano-powders possessed excellent sinterability. This technique might also be applicable to other thermoelectric materials.

  • 29.
    Cheung, Ocean
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Narrow-pore zeolites and zeolite-like adsorbents for CO2 separation2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of porous solid adsorbents were synthesised and their ability to separate and capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from gas mixtures was examined. CO2 separation from flue gas – a type of exhaust gas from fossil fuel combustion that consists of CO2 mixed with mainly nitrogen and biogas (consists of CO2 mixed with mainly methane) were explicitly considered. The selected adsorbents were chosen partly due to their narrow pore sizes. Narrow pores can differentiate gas molecules of different sizes via a kinetic separation mechanism: a large gas molecule should find it more difficult to enter a narrow pore. CO2 has the smallest kinetic diameter in zeolites when compared with the other two gases in this study. Narrow pore adsorbents can therefore, show enhanced kinetic selectivity to adsorb CO2 from a gas mixture.

    The adsorbents tested in this study included mixed cation zeolite A, zeolite ZK-4, a range of aluminophosphates and silicoaluminophosphates, as well as two types of titanium silicates (ETS-4, CTS-1). These adsorbents were compared with one another from different aspects such as CO2 capacity, CO2 selectivity, cyclic performance, working capacity, cost of synthesis, etc. Each of the tested adsorbents has its advantages and disadvantages. Serval phosphates were identified as potentially good CO2 adsorbents, but the high cost of their synthesis must be addressed in order to develop these adsorbents for applications.

  • 30.
    Cheung, Ocean
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Visualizing Gas Adsorption on Porous Solids: Four Simple, Effective Demonstrations2014In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 91, no 9, 1468-1472 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gas adsorption on porous solids is a topic that is often discussed in an undergraduate chemistry or chemical engineering course. The idea of porosity and gas adsorption on a porous solid is usually discussed with adsorption isotherms recorded using commercially available equipment. This discussion can be rather abstract and can be difficult for students to visualize. Here, four demonstrations highlight the adsorption of CO2 gas on adsorbents. These simple demonstrations show gas adsorption in a dynamic way that can help students understand the properties of porous solids.

  • 31.
    Cheung, Ocean
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Bacsik, Zoltán
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Krokidas, Panagiotis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Mace, Amber
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Physical Chemistry.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Physical Chemistry.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    K+ Exchanged Zeolite ZK-4 as a Highly Selective Sorbent for CO22014In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 30, no 32, 9682-9690 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adsorbents with high capacity and selectivity for adsorption of CO2 are currently being investigated for applications in adsorption-driven separation of CO2 from flue gas. An adsorbent with a particularly high CO2-over-N-2 selectivity and high capacity was tested here. Zeolite ZK-4 (Si:Al similar to 1.3:1), which had the same structure as zeolite A (LTA), showed a high CO2 capacity of 4.85 mmol/g (273 K, 101 kPa) in its Na+ form. When approximately 26 at % of the extraframework cations were exchanged for K+ (NaK-ZK-4), the material still adsorbed a large amount of CO2 (4.35 mmol/g, 273 K, 101 kPa), but the N-2 uptake became negligible (<0.03 mmol/g, 273 K, 101 kPa). The majority of the CO2 was physisorbed on zeolite ZK-4 as quantified by consecutive volumetric adsorption measurements. The rate of physisorption of CO2 was fast, even for the highly selective sample. The molecular details of the sorption of CO2 were revealed as well. Computer modeling (Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum chemical calculations) allowed us to partly predict the behavior of fully K+ exchanged zeolite K-ZK-4 upon adsorption of CO2 and N-2 for Si:Al ratios up to 4:1. Zeolite K-ZK-4 with Si:Al ratios below 23:1 restricted the diffusion of CO2 and N-2 across the cages. These simulations could not probe the delicate details of the molecular sieving of CO2 over N-2. Still, this study indicates that zeolites NaK-ZK-4 and K-ZK-4 could be appealing adsorbents with high CO2 uptake (similar to 4 mmol/g, 101 kPa, 273 K) and a kinetically enhanced CO2-over-N-2 selectivity.

  • 32.
    Cheung, Ocean
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Jie, Su
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zoltán, Bacsik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Jing, Li
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Samain, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Xiaodong, Zou
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Niklas, Hedin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    CO2 selective NaMg-CTS-1 and its structural formation from the titanium silicate based molecule sieve NaMg-ETS-4 upon dehydration2014In: Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, ISSN 1387-1811, Vol. 198, 63-73 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of titanium silicates (ETS-4 and CTS-1) with interesting gas separation properties were studied as CO2 adsorbents. Some of these adsorbents, in particular NaMg-CTS-1, showed the ability to selectively adsorb CO2-over-N2. Partially exchanged NaM-ETS-4 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) were synthesised in the Na+ form and ion exchanged with group 2 cations. All but NaBa-ETS-4 transformed into their CTS-1 counterparts, when these partially exchanged Na-ETS-4 were dehydrated. The transformation from ETS-4 to CTS-1 was monitored and studied extensively using diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Powder X-ray diffraction allowed us to follow the changes of the unit cell parameters occurred at different temperatures. We combined high energy X-ray total scattering (analysed by pair distribution functions – PDF analysis), electron diffraction, infrared, Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the transformation of ETS-4 to CTS-1. We understood that under dehydration steps, there was significant disruption to the Ti–O–Ti chain along the b-axis, which occurred concurrently with the distortion of the double 3-rings alongside of these chains. These changes were partly responsible for the contraction of the ETS-4 framework (and successive transformation to CTS-1). The new information allowed us to understand the interesting structures and sorption properties of these adsorbents

  • 33.
    Cheung, Ocean
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Wardecki, Dariusz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vasiliev, Petr
    McCusker, Lynne B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). ETH Zürich, Switzerland.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Highly selective uptake of carbon dioxide on the zeolite vertical bar Na10.2KCs0.8 vertical bar-LTA - a possible sorbent for biogas upgrading2016In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 18, no 24, 16080-16083 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vertical bar Na10.2KCs0.8 vertical bar(8)[Al12Si12O48](8)(Fm3c)-LTA zeolite adsorbs CO2-over-CH4 with a high selectivity (over 1500). The uptake of carbon dioxide is also high (3.31 mmol g(-1), 293 K, 101 kPa). This form of zeolite A is a very promising adsorbent for applications such as biogas upgrading, where keeping the adsorption of methane to a minimum is crucial.

  • 34.
    Cheung, Ocean
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Zoltán, Bacsik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Panagiotis, Krokidas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Niklas, Hedin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    CO2 separation properties of high silicon zeolite NaK-ZK-4 with Si:Al up to 2.8:1Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Cheung, Ocean
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Zoltán, Bacsik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Petr, Vasiliev
    Niklas, Hedin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Carbon dioxide separation from methane on highly selective ion exchanged zeolite NaKCsA – a possible sorbent for biogas upgradingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36. Cho, Hae Sung
    et al.
    Miyasaka, Keiichi
    Kim, Hyungjun
    Kubota, Yoshiki
    Takata, Masaki
    Kitagawa, Susumu
    Ryoo, Ryong
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Study of Argon Gas Adsorption in Ordered Mesoporous MFI Zeolite Framework2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 48, 25300-25308 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ordered mesoporous MFI zeolite material (Meso-MFI) was prepared by using CMK-type mesoporous carbons as a hard template. The Meso-MFI exhibits both structural and adsorption differences compared to the conventional bulk MFI zeolite. To study the argon (Ar) adsorption process in Meso-MFI, an in situ gas adsorption powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed using synchrotron X-ray source. Structural rearrangement of the mesoporous MFI zeolite upon Ar adsorption at low temperature (83 K) was intensively studied together with Ar adsorption process in Meso-MFI. We observed that a structural transition of the Meso-MFI zeolite framework from monoclinic (P2(1)/n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) occurred at around 126 Pa at 83 K. Positions of Ar atoms are determined as a function of the Ar gas pressure through Rietveld refinement of powder XRD data. Ar atoms are observed at straight channels, sinusoidal channels, and the intersection of these channels at low pressure. As gas pressure increases, Ar atoms in the pore intersection are pulled off from the intersection toward the straight and sinusoidal channels. The pore shape of the straight channel is changed accordingly with the amount of adsorbed Ar atoms within the pores from circular to oval. These results indicate that Ar adsorption induces not only continuous rearrangement of framework atoms but also symmetry change in the Meso-MFI. A molecular simulation study combined with Rietveld refinement of in situ XRD data provided a full understanding of the adsorption process of Ar in Meso-MFI.

  • 37.
    Cui, Daqing
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Rondinella, V. V.
    Fortner, J. A.
    Kropf, A. J.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wronkiewicz, D. J.
    Spahiu, K.
    Characterization of alloy particles extracted from spent nuclear fuel2012In: Journal of Nuclear Materials, ISSN 0022-3115, E-ISSN 1873-4820, Vol. 420, no 1-3, 328-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We characterized, for the first time, submicro- and nanosized fission product-alloy particles that were extracted nondestructively from spent nuclear fuel, in terms of noble metal (Mo-Ru-Tc-Rh-Pd-Te) composition, atomic level homogeneity and lattice parameters. The evidences obtained in this work contribute to an improved understanding of the redox chemistry of radionuclides in nuclear waste repository environments and, in particular, of the catalytic properties of these unique metal alloy particles.

  • 38.
    Dey, Kalpana R.
    et al.
    Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Mineral, Hannover, Germany .
    Debnath, Tapas
    Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Mineral, Hannover, Germany .
    Ruescher, Claus H.
    Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Mineral, Hannover, Germany .
    Sundberg, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Hussain, Altaf
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Chem, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh .
    Synthesis and characterization of niobium doped hexagonal tungsten bronze in the systems, Cs(x)Nb(y)W(1-y)O(3)2011In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 46, no 5, 1388-1395 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Samples of nominal compositions, Cs(0.25)Nb (y) W(1-y) O(3) and Cs(0.3)Nb (y) W(1-y) O(3) with 0.0 a parts per thousand currency sign y a parts per thousand currency sign 0.25 and 0.0 a parts per thousand currency sign y a parts per thousand currency sign 0.3 were synthesized using appropriate amounts of Cs(2)WO(4), WO(3) and WO(2) in evacuated and closed silica glass tubes at 800 A degrees C. The polycrystalline products contain hexagonal shaped crystals of up to 15 mu m diameter as long as y a parts per thousand currency sign 0.15. X-ray powder patterns of the samples reveal the formation of hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB-I) type phase with y < 0.1. A mixture of HTB-I and an analogous less reduced hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB-II) type phase is seen when y a parts per thousand yen 0.1. HTB-II content increases with increasing y, revealing close similarity to bronzoid type phases when y = x. Results of SEM/EDX analysis also support a partial substitution of tungsten by niobium in the HTB-I type phase. Infrared absorption and optical reflectivity data shows the effect of increasing amount of non-metallic phase for y > 0.1 and the effect of counterdoping by Nb(5+)/W(5+) substitution in the metallic HTB-I type phase for y a parts per thousand currency sign 0.1, respectively. Reinvestigations in the system Rb(0.3)Nb (y) W(1-y) O(3) (0.0 a parts per thousand currency sign y a parts per thousand currency sign 0.175) show similar results with increasing content of HTB-II type phase related with y.

  • 39. Disch, Sabrina
    et al.
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hermann, Raphael P.
    Korolkov, Denis
    Busch, Peter
    Boesecke, Peter
    Lyon, Olivier
    Vainio, Ulla
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brueckel, Thomas
    Structural diversity in iron oxide nanoparticle assemblies as directed by particle morphology and orientation2013In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, Vol. 5, no 9, 3969-3975 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mesostructure of ordered arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles is controlled by a combination of packing constraints and interparticle interactions, two factors that are strongly dependent on the particle morphology. We have investigated how the degree of truncation of iron oxide nanocubes controls the mesostructure and particle orientation in drop cast mesocrystal arrays. The combination of grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy shows that mesocrystals of highly truncated cubic nanoparticles assemble in an fcc-type mesostructure, similar to arrays formed by iron oxide nanospheres, but with a significantly reduced packing density and displaying two different growth orientations. Strong satellite reflections in the GISAXS pattern indicate a commensurate mesoscopic superstructure that is related to stacking faults in mesocrystals of the anisotropic nanocubes. Our results show how subtle variation in shape anisotropy can induce oriented arrangements of nanoparticles of different structures and also create mesoscopic superstructures of larger periodicity.

  • 40. Disch, Sabrina
    et al.
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hermann, Raphaël
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Busch, Peter
    Brückel, Thomas
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kamali, Saeed
    Shape Induced Symmetry in Self-Assembled Mesocrystals of Iron Oxide Nanocubes2011In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 11, no 4, 1651-1656 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grazing incidence small-angle scattering and electron microscopy have been used to show for the first time that nonspherical nanoparticles can assemble into highly ordered body-centered tetragonal mesocrystals. Energy models accounting for the directionality and magnitude of the van der Waals and dipolar interactions as a function of the degree of truncation of the nanocubes illustrated the importance of the directional dipolar forces for the formation of the initial nanocube clusters and the dominance of the van der Waals multibody interactions in the dense packed arrays.

  • 41. Dish, Sabina
    et al.
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hermann, Raphäel P.
    Wiedenmann, A.
    Vainio, U.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brückel, Thomas
    Quantitative spatial magnetization distribution in iron oxide nanocubes and nanospheres by polarized small-angle neutron scattering2012In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 14, 013025- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By means of polarized small-angle neutron scattering, we have resolved the long-standing challenge of determining the magnetization distribution in magnetic nanoparticles in absolute units. The reduced magnetization, localized in non-interacting nanoparticles, indicates strongly particle shape-dependent surface spin canting with a 0.3(1) and 0.5(1) nm thick surface shell of reduced magnetization found for similar to 9 nm nanospheres and similar to 8.5 nm nanocubes, respectively. Further, the reduced macroscopic magnetization in nanoparticles results not only from surface spin canting, but also from drastically reduced magnetization inside the uniformly magnetized core as compared to the bulk material. Our microscopic results explain the low macroscopic magnetization commonly found in nanoparticles.

  • 42. Dyachenko, O G
    et al.
    Istomin, S Y
    Fedotov, M M
    Antipov, E V
    Svensson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nygren, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Holm, W
    Structure and properties of Ba6 − xLnxNb10O30, Ln = La, Ce and Nd compounds1997In: Materials research bulletin, ISSN 0025-5408, E-ISSN 1873-4227, Vol. 32, no 4, 409-419 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ba6 − xLnxNb10O30 compounds, Ln = La, Ce and Nd, with a tetragonal tungsten bronze-type structure have been synthesized and were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and EDS analysis. The homogeneity regions of the obtained compounds were found to be 0 ≤ x ≤ 2 for La, and 0 ≤ x ≤ 1.5 for Ce and Nd. The crystal structures of Ba5LaNb10O30 and Ba4La2Nb10O30 were refined using X-ray powder diffraction data. Refinement indicated the presence of vacancies in the positions. This observation was supported by oxidation studies of the La-substituted compounds. The temperature dependence of the normalized resistivity of the compounds showed a nonmetallic behavior. The increase in the ratio with decreasing temperature is less distinct for the phases with the higher concentration of rare-earth cation.

  • 43.
    Eklöf, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Fischer, A.
    Wu, Y.
    Scheidt, E. -W
    Scherer, W.
    Haussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Transport properties of the ii v semiconductor znsb2013In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 1, no 4, 1407-1414 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intermetallic compound ZnSb is an electron poor (II-V) semiconductor with interesting thermoelectric properties. Electrical resistivity, thermopower and thermal conductivity were measured on single crystalline and various polycrystalline specimens. The work establishes the presence of impurity band conduction as an intrinsic phenomenon of ZnSb. The impurity band governs electrical transport properties at temperatures up to 300-400 K after which ZnSb becomes an intrinsic conductor. Furthermore this work establishes an inherently low lattice thermal conductivity of ZnSb, which is comparable to the state-of-the- art thermoelectric material PbTe. It is argued that the impurity band relates to the presence of Zn defects and the low thermal conductivity to the electron-poor bonding properties of ZnSb.

  • 44. Eldesouky, A.
    et al.
    Johnsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Svengren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Attallah, M. M.
    Salem, H. G.
    Effect of grain size reduction of AA2124 aluminum alloy powder compacted by spark plasma sintering2014In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, Vol. 609, 215-221 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystalline (Average grain size similar to 200 nm) bulk AA2124 alloy was produced through high energy ball milling of microcrystalline powder followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 480 degrees C with a holding time of 10 min. The effect of initial particle and grain size on the microstructural evolution as well as on the relative density and mechanical properties of the specimens consolidated through SPS and hot pressing (HP) at the same temperature for 60 min was investigated for ball milled nano-powders (NP), as well as as-received micro-powders (MP). Results showed that the NP specimens consolidated with SPS had the highest microhardness values compared to the other specimens despite not achieving full densification. On the other hand, a general increase in density, hardness, and compressive strength was observed for all SPS consolidates compared to HP. The presence of aluminum oxide and its influence on the consolidation process as well as the resulting mechanical properties of the bulk specimens is also discussed. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 45.
    Eriksson, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Methyl 3-O-alpha-L-fucopyranosyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside: a synchrotron study2012In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. 68, o528-U1770 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The title compound, C13H24O10 is the methyl glycoside of a structural element alpha-L-Fucp-(1 -> 3)-alpha-D-Galp making up two thirds of the repeating unit in the capsular polysaccharide of Klebsiella K63. The conformation of the title compound is described by the glycosidic torsion angles phi(H) = 55 (1)degrees and psi H = -24 (1)degrees. The hydroxymethyl group in the galactose residue is present in the gauche-trans conformation. In the crystal, O-H center dot center dot center dot O hydrogen bonds connect the disaccharide units into chains along the a-axis direction and further hydrogen bonds cross-link the chains.

  • 46.
    Eriksson, Mirva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spark Plasma Sintering Enhancing Grain Sliding, Deformation and Grain Size Control: Studies of the Systems Ti, Ti/TiB2, Na0.5 K0.5 NbO3, and Hydroxyapatite2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique features of the Spark plasma sintering (SPS) were used to investigate the sintering and deformation behaviour of titanium and titanium–titanium diboride composites, and to control the sintering and grain growth of ferroelectric Na0.5K0.5NbO3 (NKN) and of hydroxyapatite (HAp). In the SPS the samples experience a temperature different from that recorded by the thermocouple (pyrometer) used and this temperature difference has been estimated for Ti and NKN.

     

    Sintering and deformation of titanium was investigated. Increasing heating rate and/or pressure shifted the sintering to lower temperatures, and the sintering and deformation rates changed when the α→β phase transition temperature was passed. Fully dense Ti/TiB2 composites were prepared. The Ti/TiB2 composites could be deformed at high temperatures, but the hardness decreased due to the formation of TiB. 

     

    The kinetic windows within which it is possible to obtain fully dense NKN and HAp ceramics and simultaneously avoid grain growth are defined. Materials have a threshold temperature above which rapid and abnormal grain growth takes place. The abnormal grain growth of NKN is due to a small shift in the stoichiometry, which in turn impairs the ferroelectric properties. Fully transparent HAp nanoceramics was prepared, and between 900 and 1050 oC elongated grains are formed, while above 1050 oC abnormal grain growth takes place.NKN samples containing grains of the sizes 0.35–0.6 µm yielded optimum ferroelectric properties, i.e. a high remanent polarization (Pr = 30 µC/cm2) and high piezoelectric constant (d33= 160 pC/N). The ferroelectric domain structure was studied, and all grains exhibited a multi-domain type of structure.

  • 47.
    Eriksson, Mirva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Liu, Yi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hu, Jiangfeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gao, Lian
    Nygren, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Shen, Zhijian James
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Transparent hydroxyapatite ceramics with nanograin structure prepared by high pressure spark plasma sintering at the minimized sintering temperature2011In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, Vol. 31, no 9, 1533-1540 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hydrothermally processed bulky powder composed of loosely aggregated nano-sized rods was consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The use of a high pressure cell allows the application of pressure up to 500 MPa. It was found that applying of high pressure is beneficial for widening up the kinetic window for attaining dense HAp nanoceramics. The high transparency of HAp nanoceramics obtained in this study is ascribed to the high density and homogeneous nano-grained structure achieved besides the unique intrinsic optical properties of the HAp crystal itself, i.e. its low refractive index and very small birefringence. Achieving full densification at the minimized sintering temperature allows for the first time the preparation of transparent HAp nanoceramics with stoichiometric composition, i.e. avoiding the loss of structural water that commonly takes place during the conventional ways of sintering.

  • 48.
    Eriksson, Mirva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Radwan, Mohamed
    Shen, Zhijian James
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spark plasma sintering of wc, cemented carbide and functional graded materials2013In: International journal of refractory metals & hard materials, ISSN 0958-0611, ISSN 0263-4368, Vol. 36, 31-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is an extremely fast solidification technique for compounds that are difficult to sinter within the material group's metals, ceramics, or composites thereof. SPS uses a uniaxial pressure and a very rapid heating cycle to consolidate these materials. The heating is generated by Joule effect when a strong, pulsed electric current passes the conductive graphite die and also through the sample, if conductive. Cemented carbides (hard metals) are mostly used for metal cutting and drilling, wood cutting or rock drilling tools and are consolidated either by pressureless sintering (PLS), hot pressing (HP), or hot isostatic pressing (HIP). With SPS the main benefit is the ability to control the WC grain size due to the short sintering times at high temperature. In addition, unwished reactions between WC and cobalt to form other phases are minimized. By SPS the amount of cobalt can be reduced towards zero in fully dense WC materials. With this technique it is easy to prepare gradient materials where a ductile weldable metal can be joined with the cemented carbide part.

  • 49.
    Fahlquist, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kadir, Karim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Noréus, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Structural characterization of Sr4Mg4H4[CoH5](3) shows the importance of support from polarizing counter ions to 3d transition metal hydrido complexes2013In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, Vol. 579, 31-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of the title compound was refined from neutron powder diffraction data in the cubic space group P-43m (215). The unit cell contains one formula unit with 3 structurally equivalent [Co(I)H-5](4)-complexes as well as 4 interstitial hydride (H-) ions. The presence of the larger and less polarizing Sr2+ ions weakens the bond in the complexes and probably also the stability of the structure. Attempts to synthesize the corresponding Ba analogue failed in contrast to using smaller and more polarizing Ca2+ and Yb2+ counterions.

  • 50.
    Fahlquist, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Moser, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Noréus, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Refson, Keith
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.
    Parker, Stewart F.
    STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.
    SrH2Mg2[Co(I)H5], BaH2Mg5[Co(-I)H4]2 and RbH2Mg5[Co(-I)H4 Ni(0)H4] illustrate how small variations in counter ions are important for the solid state stabilization of 3d-transition metal hydrido complexes as well as influencing electrical and magnetic propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Variations in the counter ion support to low valent 3d transition metal hydrido complexes in solids state hydrides influence formal oxidation states as well as their electrical properties. In a combined study using neutron scattering and first principle calculations a very low formal oxidation state of (-I) can be described for cobalt in a slightly distorted tetrahedral Co(-I)H4-complex in BaH2Mg5[Co(-I)H4]2 and in the structurally closely related RbH2Mg5[Co(-I)H4 Ni(0)H4]. This indicates that the electron “back donating” effect via the polarisable hydride ions to the counter ions in the solid state hydrides, can be compared to more conventional “back bonding” and reduce the oxidation state down to -I. The hydrides were synthesised by hot sintering of transition metal powders with the corresponding binary alkali- and alkaline earth hydrides. In the similarly synthesized SrH2Mg2[Co(I)H5] cobalt is formally +I-valent,  showing a high sensitivity to subtle differences in the counter ion framework.

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