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  • 1.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berger, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The evolution of alternative developmental pathways: footprints of selection on life-history traits in a butterfly2012In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 25, no 7, 1377-1388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental pathways may evolve to optimize alternative phenotypes across environments. However, the maintenance of such adaptive plasticity under relaxed selection has received little study. We compare the expression of life-history traits across two developmental pathways in two populations of the butterfly Pararge aegeria where both populations express a diapause pathway but one never expresses direct development in nature. In the population with ongoing selection on both pathways, the difference between pathways in development time and growth rate was larger, whereas the difference in body size was smaller compared with the population experiencing relaxed selection on one pathway. This indicates that relaxed selection on the direct pathway has allowed life-history traits to drift towards values associated with lower fitness when following this pathway. Relaxed selection on direct development was also associated with a higher degree of genetic variation for protandry expressed as within-family sexual dimorphism in growth rate. Genetic correlations for larval growth rate across sexes and pathways were generally positive, with the notable exception of correlation estimates that involved directly developing males of the population that experienced relaxed selection on this pathway. We conclude that relaxed selection on one developmental pathway appears to have partly disrupted the developmental regulation of life-history trait expression. This in turn suggests that ongoing selection may be responsible for maintaining adaptive developmental regulation along alternative developmental pathways in these populations.

  • 2.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Diapause induction and relaxed selection on alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2015In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 84, no 2, 464-472 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life-history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 3.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Latitudinal phenological adaptation: diapause induction and differentiation between alternative developmental pathways in a butterflyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway.

    2. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch, and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development.

    3. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch.

    4. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 4.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    The development and expression of seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits in the butterfly Pararge aegeriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The diapause switch: Evolution of alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diapause decision is a classic example of a threshold switch mechanism with cascading effects on morphology, behaviour and life-history traits. This thesis addresses the downstream effects of the insect diapause switch, with the main focus on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits, using the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria) as a study species. The ultimate pathway decision is made towards the end of larval development and allows the larvae to take into account up-to-date information from the environment about future conditions (Paper I, IV). However, already from an early point in development the larvae are sensitive to environmental cues and continuously adjust their growth trajectory in accordance to current information about the environmental conditions to be expected in future (Paper IV). An asymmetry in the ability to change from one developmental pathway to another at a late point in larval development suggests that the diapause and the direct pathway require different physiological preparations (Paper IV). Pathway-specific regulation of traits downstream of the diapause switch is maintained by ongoing selection. When the direct pathway is not regularly expressed, as with a shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism, relaxed selection on the unexpressed pathway leads to genetic drift and loss of protandry (Paper II, III). Natural populations display local adaptations in the diapause switch with an increase in critical daylengths as there is a gradual shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism (Paper III). This thesis highlights two aspects of the diapause decision, the determination of how and when this decision is made as well as the way the resulting pathways are moulded by selection in order to produce adaptive seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits.

  • 6.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vare, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Motwani, Hitesh V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jenssen, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions2016In: Mutation research. Genetic toxicology and environmental mutagenesis, ISSN 1383-5718, E-ISSN 1879-3592, Vol. 805, 38-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration x cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at ante of 0.08 +/- 0:01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5 rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study.

  • 7.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Particle Emissions From Rail Traffic: A Literature Review2013In: Critical reviews in environmental science and technology, ISSN 1064-3389, E-ISSN 1547-6537, Vol. 43, no 23, 2511-2544 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle emissions are a drawback of rail transport. This work is a comprehensive presentation of recent research into particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and nonexhaust particle emissions are considered when examining particle characteristics such as PM10, and PM2.5 concentration levels, size, morphology, composition, and adverse health effects, current legislation, and available and proposed solutions for reducing such emissions. High concentration levels in enclosed rail traffic environments are reported and some toxic effects of the particles. The authors find that only a few limited studies have examined the adverse health effects of nonexhaust particle emissions and that no relevant legislation exists. Thus further research in this area is warranted.

  • 8.
    Abdel Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Abdel Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Screening and determination of drugs in human saliva utilizing microextraction by packed sorbent and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2013In: BMC Biomedical chromotography, ISSN 0269-3879, E-ISSN 1099-0801, Vol. 27, no 9, 1188-1191 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a new method for collecting and handling saliva samples using an automated analytical microsyringe and microextraction by packed syringe (MEPS). The screening and determination of lidocaine in human saliva samples utilizing MEPS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were carried out. An exact volume of saliva could be collected. The MEPS C-8-cartridge could be used for 50 extractions before it was discarded. The extraction recovery was about 60%. The pharmacokinetic curve of lidocaine in saliva using MEPS-LC-MS/MS is reported.

  • 9.
    Abdel-Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Evaluation of microextraction by packed sorbent and micro-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as a green approach in bioanalysis2013In: BMC Biomedical chromotography, ISSN 0269-3879, E-ISSN 1099-0801, Vol. 27, no 10, 1225-1233 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the use of micro-liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was investigated in routine bioanalysis application for separation and quantification of pro-drug AZD6319 (developed for aldezheimer treatment). Microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) was used as sample clean-up method. The focus of this study was put on the evaluation of the usability of smaller column diameters such as 1.0 and 0.3mm instead of 2.1mm in bioanalysis application to reduce solvent consumption and sample volumes. Solvent consumption was reduced by 80% when a 1.0mm column was used compared with 2.1mm column. Robustness of the micro-columns in terms of accuracy and precision was investigated. The application of LC-MS/MS for the quantitative analysis of AZD6319 in plasma samples showed good selectivity, accuracy and precision. The coefficients of determination (R-2) were >0.998 for all runs using plasma samples on the studied micro-columns. The inter-day accuracy values for quality control samples ranged from 99 to 103% and from 96 to 105% for 0.3x50mm and 1.0x50mm columns, respectively. The inter-day precision values ranged from 4.0 to 9.0% and from 4.0 to 8.0% for 0.3x50 and 1.0x50mm columns, respectively. In addition the sensitivity was increased by three times using a 1.0mm column compared with 2.1mm. Furthermore, robustness of the micro-columns from different manufacturers was investigated.

  • 10.
    Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mercury and silver induce B cell activation and anti-nucleolar autoantibody production in outbred mouse stocks: are environmental factors more important than the susceptibility genes in connection with autoimmunity?2009In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 155, no 1, 117-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental and predisposing genetic factors are known to play a crucial role in the development of systemic autoimmune diseases. With respect to the role of environmental factors, it is not known how and to what extent they contribute to the initiation and exacerbation of systemic autoimmunity. In the present study, I considered this issue and asked if environmental factors can induce autoimmunity in the absence of specific susceptible genes. The development of genetically controlled mercury- and silver-induced B cell activation and anti-nucleolar autoantibodies (ANolA) production in genetically heterozygous outbred Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) and Black Swiss mouse stocks were analysed. Four weeks of treatment with both mercury and silver induced a strong B cell activation characterized by increased numbers of splenic antibody-secreting cells of at least one or more immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype(s) in all treated stocks. The three stocks also exhibited a marked increase in the serum IgE levels in response to mercury, but not silver. More importantly, in response to mercury a large numbers of ICR (88%), NMRI (96%) and Black Swiss (100%) mice produced different levels of IgG1 and IgG2a ANolA (a characteristic which is linked strictly to the H-2 genes). Similarly, but at lower magnitudes, treatment with silver also induced the production of IgG1 and IgG2a ANolA in 60% of ICR, 75% of NMRI and 100% of Black Swiss mice. Thus, the findings of this study suggest that long-term exposure to certain environmental factors can activate the immune system to produce autoimmunity per se, without requiring specific susceptible genes.

  • 11.
    Abelein, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Modulation of Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide self-assembly: Insights into molecular mechanisms of peptide aggregation associated with Alzheimer's disease2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Misfolding of proteins and peptides is closely linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, among them Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prominent example of brain diseases. The self-assembly of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) into amyloid fibrils is one histologic hallmark of AD. A detailed knowledge about the underlying mechanism(s) of Aβ aggregation is crucial for advances toward a fundamental understanding of the disease, which may promote the search for and design of efficient therapeutics. The work presented in this thesis deals with modulation of the aggregation process by various compounds, i.e. small organic molecules (e.g. lacmoid and Congo red), surfactants and metal ions. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of modulator interactions and interference with Aβ and its aggregation pathways. Applying a combination of kinetic and dynamic studies as well as structural investigations we characterized the molecular interactions between Aβ and aggregation modulators in terms of microscopic rate constants, conformational preferences and thermodynamics. An important conclusion is that these modulators form highly dynamic complexes with Aβ, with life-times on the timescale of milliseconds. Despite the similar exchange dynamics, the effect on peptide aggregation is modulator-specific and fibril formation can be accelerated, retarded or inhibited by their interactions. In summary, Aβ self-assembly is governed by microscopic kinetic and dynamic processes that can be altered by aggregation modulators. Further elucidation of these mechanisms is beneficial for the understanding and therapeutic intervention of amyloid diseases.

  • 12.
    Abelein, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Modulation of amyloid β peptide self-assembly: Aggregation mechanisms associated with Alzheimer's disease2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Abrahams, Jan Pieter
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jarvet, Juri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Estonia.
    Luo, Jinghui
    Tiiman, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    The hairpin conformation of the amyloid beta peptide is an important structural motif along the aggregation pathway2014In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 19, no 4-5, 623-634 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amyloid beta (A beta) peptides are 39-42 residue-long peptides found in the senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. These peptides self-aggregate in aqueous solution, going from soluble and mainly unstructured monomers to insoluble ordered fibrils. The aggregation process(es) are strongly influenced by environmental conditions. Several lines of evidence indicate that the neurotoxic species are the intermediate oligomeric states appearing along the aggregation pathways. This minireview summarizes recent findings, mainly based on solution and solid-state NMR experiments and electron microscopy, which investigate the molecular structures and characteristics of the A beta peptides at different stages along the aggregation pathways. We conclude that a hairpin-like conformation constitutes a common motif for the A beta peptides in most of the described structures. There are certain variations in different hairpin conformations, for example regarding H-bonding partners, which could be one reason for the molecular heterogeneity observed in the aggregated systems. Interacting hairpins are the building blocks of the insoluble fibrils, again with variations in how hairpins are organized in the cross-section of the fibril, perpendicular to the fibril axis. The secondary structure propensities can be seen already in peptide monomers in solution. Unfortunately, detailed structural information about the intermediate oligomeric states is presently not available. In the review, special attention is given to metal ion interactions, particularly the binding constants and ligand structures of A beta complexes with Cu(II) and Zn(II), since these ions affect the aggregation process(es) and are considered to be involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying AD pathology.

  • 14.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bolognesi, Benedetta
    Dobson, Christopher M.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lendel, Christofer
    Hydrophobicity and conformational change as mechanistic determinants for nonspecific modulators of amyloid β self-assembly2012In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 51, no 1, 126-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and the aberrant folding and aggregation of proteins has prompted a comprehensive search for small organic molecules that have the potential to inhibit such processes. Although many compounds have been reported to affect the formation of amyloid fibrils and/or other types of protein aggregates, the mechanisms by which they act are not well understood. A large number of compounds appear to act in a nonspecific way affecting several different amyloidogenic proteins. We describe here a detailed study of the mechanism of action of one representative compound, lacmoid, in the context of the inhibition of the aggregation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We show that lacmoid binds Aβ(1-40) in a surfactant-like manner and counteracts the formation of all types of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) aggregates. On the basis of these and previous findings, we are able to rationalize the molecular mechanisms of action of nonspecific modulators of protein self-assembly in terms of hydrophobic attraction and the conformational preferences of the polypeptide.

  • 15.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The zinc ion – a minimal chaperone mimicking agent forretardation of amyloid β peptide fibril formationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zinc as chaperone-mimicking agent for retardation of amyloid beta peptide fibril formation2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 17, 5407-5412 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal ions have emerged to play a key role in the aggregation process of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide that is closely related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanistic process of peptide-metal interactions, however, has been challenging to obtain. By applying a combination of NMR relaxation dispersion and fluorescence kinetics methods we have investigated quantitatively the thermodynamic A beta-Zn2+ binding features as well as how Zn2+ modulates the nucleation mechanism of the aggregation process. Our results show that, under near-physiological conditions, substoichiometric amounts of Zn2+ effectively retard the generation of amyloid fibrils. A global kinetic profile analysis reveals that in the absence of zinc A beta(40) aggregation is driven by a monomer-dependent secondary nucleation process in addition to fibril-end elongation. In the presence of Zn2+, the elongation rate is reduced, resulting in reduction of the aggregation rate, but not a complete inhibition of amyloid formation. We show that Zn2+ transiently binds to residues in the N terminus of the monomeric peptide. A thermodynamic analysis supports a model where the N terminus is folded around the Zn2+ ion, forming a marginally stable, short-lived folded A beta(40) species. This conformation is highly dynamic and only a few percent of the peptide molecules adopt this structure at any given time point. Our findings suggest that the folded A beta(40)-Zn2+ complex modulates the fibril ends, where elongation takes place, which efficiently retards fibril formation. In this conceptual framework we propose that zinc adopts the role of a minimal antiaggregation chaperone for A beta(40).

  • 17.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling
    Nielsen, Søren Bang
    Jensen, Grethe Vestergaard
    Christiansen, Gunna
    Pedersen, Jan Skov
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Otzen, Daniel E.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Formation of dynamic soluble surfactant-induced amyloid β peptide aggregation intermediates2013In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 288, no 32, 23518-23528 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intermediate amyloidogenic states along the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) aggregation pathway have been shown to be linked to neurotoxicity. To shed more light on the different structures that may arise during Aβ aggregation, we here investigate surfactant-induced Aβ aggregation. This process leads to co-aggregates featuring a β-structure motif that is characteristic for mature amyloid-like structures. Surfactants induce secondary structure in Aβ in a concentration-dependent manner, from predominantly random coil at low surfactant concentration, via β-structure to the fully formed α-helical state at high surfactant concentration. The β-rich state is the most aggregation-prone as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals initial globular structures of surfactant-Aβ co-aggregated oligomers and formation of elongated fibrils during a slow aggregation process. Alongside this slow (minutes to hours time scale) fibrillation process, much faster dynamic exchange (k(ex) ∼1100 s(-1)) takes place between free and co-aggregate-bound peptide. The two hydrophobic segments of the peptide are directly involved in the chemical exchange and interact with the hydrophobic part of the co-aggregates. Our findings suggest a model for surfactant-induced aggregation where free peptide and surfactant initially co-aggregate to dynamic globular oligomers and eventually form elongated fibrils. When interacting with β-structure promoting substances, such as surfactants, Aβ is kinetically driven toward an aggregation-prone state.

  • 18.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lendel, Christofer
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Corrigendum to “Transient small molecule interactions kinetically modulate amyloid β peptide self-assembly” [FEBS Lett. 586 (2012) 3991–3995]2013In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 587, no 9, 1452-1452 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lendel, Christofer
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Transient small molecule interactions kinetically modulate amyloid beta peptide self-assembly2012In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 586, no 22, 3991-3995 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small organic molecules, like Congo red and lacmoid, have been shown to modulate the self-assembly of the amyloid beta peptide (A beta). Here, we show that A beta forms NMR invisible non-toxic co-aggregates together with lacmoid as well as Congo red. We find that the interaction involves two distinct kinetic processes and at every given time point only a small fraction of A beta is in the co-aggregate. These weak transient interactions kinetically redirect the aggregation prone A beta from self-assembling into amyloid fibrils. These findings suggest that even such weak binders might be effective as therapeutics against pathogenic protein aggregation.

  • 20. Abiven, Samuel
    et al.
    Hund, Andreas
    Martinsen, Vegard
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Norway; Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Norway .
    Biochar amendment increases maize root surface areas and branching: a shovelomics study in Zambia2015In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 395, no 1-2, 45-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positive crop yield effects from biochar are likely explained by chemical, physical and/or biological factors. However, studies describing plant allometric changes are scarcer, but may be crucial to understand the biochar effect. The main aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of biochar on root architecture under field conditions in a tropical setting. The presented work describes a shovelomics (i.e., description of root traits in the field) study on the effect of biochar on maize root architecture. Four field experiments we carried out at two different locations in Zambia, exhibiting non-fertile to relatively fertile soils. Roots of maize crop (Zea mays L.) were sampled from treatments with fertilizer (control) and with a combination of fertilizer and 4 t.ha(-1) maize biochar application incorporated in the soil. For the four sites, the average grain yield increase upon biochar addition was 45 +/- 14 % relative to the fertilized control (from 2.1-6.0 to 3.1-9.1 ton ha(-1)). The root biomass was approximately twice as large for biochar-amended plots. More extensive root systems (especially characterized by a larger root opening angle (+14 +/- 11 %) and wider root systems (+20 +/- 15 %)) were observed at all biochar-amended sites. Root systems exhibited significantly higher specific surface areas (+54 +/- 14 %), branching and fine roots: +70 +/- 56 %) in the presence of biochar. Biochar amendment resulted in more developed root systems and larger yields. The more extensive root systems may have contributed to the observed yield increases, e.g., by improving immobile nutrients uptake in soils that are unfertile or in areas with prolonged dry spells.

  • 21. Abrahamczyk, S.
    et al.
    Kessler, M.
    Hanley, D.
    Karger, D. N.
    Mueller, M. P. J.
    Knauer, A. C.
    Keller, F.
    Schwerdtfeger, M.
    Humphreys, Aelys M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Imperial College London, UK.
    Pollinator adaptation and the evolution of floral nectar sugar composition2017In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 30, no 1, 112-127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A long-standing debate concerns whether nectar sugar composition evolves as an adaptation to pollinator dietary requirements or whether it is 'phylogenetically constrained'. Here, we use a modelling approach to evaluate the hypothesis that nectar sucrose proportion (NSP) is an adaptation to pollinators. We analyse similar to 2100 species of asterids, spanning several plant families and pollinator groups (PGs), and show that the hypothesis of adaptation cannot be rejected: NSP evolves towards two optimal values, high NSP for specialist-pollinated and low NSP for generalist-pollinated plants. However, the inferred adaptive process is weak, suggesting that adaptation to PG only provides a partial explanation for how nectar evolves. Additional factors are therefore needed to fully explain nectar evolution, and we suggest that future studies might incorporate floral shape and size and the abiotic environment into the analytical framework. Further, we show that NSP and PG evolution are correlated - in a manner dictated by pollinator behaviour. This contrasts with the view that a plant necessarily has to adapt its nectar composition to ensure pollination but rather suggests that pollinators adapt their foraging behaviour or dietary requirements to the nectar sugar composition presented by the plants. Finally, we document unexpectedly sucrose-poor nectar in some specialized nectarivorous bird-pollinated plants from the Old World, which might represent an overlooked form of pollinator deception. Thus, our broad study provides several new insights into how nectar evolves and we conclude by discussing why maintaining the conceptual dichotomy between adaptation and constraint might be unhelpful for advancing this field.

  • 22.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Regulation and measurement of brown adipose tissue blood flow2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an organ specialized in macromolecule combustion in order to produce heat. Because of its high capacity to dissipate energy, it is currently among the best hopes for future treatments of obesity and diabetes. BAT is permeated by a vast capillary network that delivers blood rich in oxygen and nutrients to supply the high metabolic needs of the tissue. At the same time, metabolites, carbon dioxide and warm blood are drained back into systemic circulation. Blood flow is in fact a limiting factor for thermogenesis. Therefore, understanding BAT blood flow regulation is a crucial step for describing the tissue function. This thesis aims to summarize anatomical descriptions, to discuss the methodological evolution of the field, and to synthetize what we have learned about mechanistic regulation of BAT blood flow during the last half century. Manuscript I introduces a new method (high-resolution laser-doppler imaging) for the measurement of BAT blood flow, and gives mechanistic insights about its physiological regulation. Manuscript II focuses on the influence of bombesin receptor subtype-3 on the neurological control of body temperature and thermogenesis.

  • 23.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Bengtsson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petrovic, Natasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    On adequate procedures for glucose tolerance tests in obese animals: Measurement of glucose tolerance in obesityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Routine procedures for glucose tolerance test in rodents utilize an amount of injected glucose that is proportional to total body weight (normally 2 mg per g body weight). Obese mice consist of much more chemically inert lipid than lean mice but have only marginal increases in lean body mass (the only compartment where glucose is distributed). Present procedures thus inevitably lead to a diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin levels in obesity. Routine procedures should use fixed glucose amounts per lean body mass (or per mouse).

  • 24.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Fischer, Alexander W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Mattsson, Charlotte
    de Jong, Jasper M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ryden, Mikael
    Laurencikiene, Jurga
    Arner, Peter
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petrovic, Natasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cidea improves the metabolic profile through expansion of adipose tissue2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, 7433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In humans, Cidea (cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor alpha-like effector A) is highly but variably expressed in white fat, and expression correlates with metabolic health. Here we generate transgenic mice expressing human Cidea in adipose tissues (aP2-hCidea mice) and show that Cidea is mechanistically associated with a robust increase in adipose tissue expandability. Under humanized conditions (thermoneutrality, mature age and prolonged exposure to high-fat diet), aP2-hCidea mice develop a much more pronounced obesity than their wild-type littermates. Remarkably, the malfunctioning of visceral fat normally caused by massive obesity is fully overcome-perilipin 1 and Akt expression are preserved, tissue degradation is prevented, macrophage accumulation is decreased and adiponectin expression remains high. Importantly, the aP2-hCidea mice display enhanced insulin sensitivity. Our data establish a functional role for Cidea and suggest that, in humans, the association between Cidea levels in white fat and metabolic health is not only correlative but also causative.

  • 25.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hagberg, Carolina E.
    Spalding, Kirsty L.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Adrenergically-stimulated blood flow in brown adipose tissue is not dependent on thermogenesis: Regulation of brown adipose tissue blood flow2015In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 308, no 9, E822-E829 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis relies on blood flow to be supplied with nutrients and oxygen, and for the distribution of the generated heat to the rest of the body. It is therefore fundamental to understand the mechanisms by which blood flow is regulated and its relation to thermogenesis. Here we present high-resolution laser-Doppler imaging (HR-LDR) as a novel method for noninvasive, in vivo measurement of BAT blood flow in mice. Using HR-LDR, we found that norepinephrine stimulation increases BAT blood flow in a dose-dependent manner, and that this response is profoundly modulated by environmental temperature acclimation. Surprisingly, we found that mice lacking uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) have fully preserved BAT blood flow response to norepinephrine, despite failing to perform thermogenesis. BAT blood flow was not directly correlated to systemic glycaemia, but glucose injections could transiently increase tissue perfusion. Inguinal white adipose tissue, also known as a brite/beige adipose tissue, was also sensitive to cold acclimation and similarly increased blood flow in response to norepinephrine. In conclusion, using a novel non-invasive method to detect BAT perfusion, we demonstrate that adrenergically-stimulated BAT blood flow is qualitatively and quantitatively fully independent of thermogenesis, and is therefore not a reliable parameter for the estimation of BAT activation and heat generation.

  • 26.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, USA.
    Xiao, Cuiying
    Gavrilova, Oksana
    Reitman, Marc L.
    Integration of body temperature into the analysis of energy expenditure in the mouse2015In: Molecular Metabolism, ISSN 2212-8778, Vol. 4, no 6, 461-470 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We quantified the effect of environmental temperature on mouse energy homeostasis and body temperature.Methods: The effect of environmental temperature (4e33 C) on body temperature, energy expenditure, physical activity, and food intake invarious mice (chow diet, high-fat diet, Brs3-/y, lipodystrophic) was measured using continuous monitoring.Results: Body temperature depended most on circadian phase and physical activity, but also on environmental temperature. The amounts ofenergy expenditure due to basal metabolic rate (calculated via a novel method), thermic effect of food, physical activity, and cold-inducedthermogenesis were determined as a function of environmental temperature. The measured resting defended body temperature matchedthat calculated from the energy expenditure using Fourier’s law of heat conduction. Mice defended a higher body temperature during physicalactivity. The cost of the warmer body temperature during the active phase is 4e16% of total daily energy expenditure. Parameters measured indiet-induced obese and Brs3-/y mice were similar to controls. The high post-mortem heat conductance demonstrates that most insulation in miceis via physiological mechanisms.Conclusions: At 22 C, cold-induced thermogenesis isw120% of basal metabolic rate. The higher body temperature during physical activity isdue to a higher set point, not simply increased heat generation during exercise. Most insulation in mice is via physiological mechanisms, with littlefrom fur or fat. Our analysis suggests that the definition of the upper limit of the thermoneutral zone should be re-considered. Measuring bodytemperature informs interpretation of energy expenditure data and improves the predictiveness and utility of the mouse to model human energyhomeostasis.

  • 27.
    Abu Bakar, Siddique
    Stockholm University.
    Immunological and functional properties of a non-repeat region in Plasmodium falciparum antigen Pf155/RESA1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is one of the most prevalent of all the great insect-borne diseases causing high morbidity and mortality in humans. As conventional anti-malarial treatment is becoming increasingly inefficient, alternative approaches to combat the parasite, like vaccine development, are of high priority. Among other antigens, Pf155/RESA has been taken into consideration for inclusion in a vaccine against the asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. Repeat sequences of this antigen induce neutralizing antibodies and are potentially involved in protective immune responses. However, the genetic restriction in the immune responses to these epitopes has made it of importance to define additional regions in this antigen which may be suitable for inclusion in a vaccine. The present studies were aimed at investigating potential immunodominant B- and T-cell epitopes in the non-repeat regions of Pf155/RESA suitable for inclusion in subunit vaccine immunogens.

    In order to define immunodominant B- and T-cell epitopes, short overlapping peptides were synthesized, corresponding to three different non-repeat sequences of Pf155/RESA. Sera collected from malaria endemic countries recognized pepetides representing N-terminal sequences of the antigen. Based on high antibody reactivity in ELISA, two peptides were selected for affinity purification of antibodies from Liberian sera. The purified antibodies were shown to be efficient in parasite growth inhibition in vitro. Furthermore, the peptides had the ability to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells from P. falciparum-immune donors to proliferate and to secrete IL-4 and/or IFN-g. Although the frequency of responders was high, the magnitude of the responses was generally low.

    Antibodies were raised in rabbits against synthetic peptides corresponding to different non-repeat sequences in Pf155/RESA. Although all antisera reacted strongly with the corresponding peptide, they reacted only weakly with full-length Pf155/RESA. Antibodies to some of the non-repeat sequences inhibited merozoite invasion in vitro, notably, also the invasion of parasites deficient in Pf155/RESA, indicating the presence of an antigen highly homologous to Pf155/RESA.

    Upon infection with P. falciparum, erythrocytes expose cryptic determinants in band 3, which are thought to mediate cytoadherence to endothelial cells. The N-terminal non-repeat region of Pf155/RESA contains a hexapeptide motif which is highly homologous to the cytoadherence related sequences of erythrocyte band 3. Synthetic peptides containing this hexapeptide motif inhibited the binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to melanoma cells in vitro. Antibodies raised against the largely overlapping sequences displayed highly different specificity patterns. Antibodies to the cytoadherence related motif of Pf155/RESA as well as antibodies raised against the peptides corresponding to the band 3 motif inhibited cytoadherence but not parasite growth. In contrast antibodies to sequences adjacent to the Pf155/RESA cytoadherence motif inhibited parasite growth in vitro but had no effect on cytoadherence.

    In summary, although the target antigens for the anti-parasitic activities displayed by the antibodies in these studies are unclear, sequences in non-repeat regions of Pf155/RESA may induce antibodies with capacity to inhibit parasite growth in vitro or to block the cytoadherence of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes to endothelial cells. The combination of non-repeat sequences with repeat sequences of Pf155/RESA in a subunit vaccine may provide immunogens with an improved capacity to induce parasite neutralizing antibody responses.

  • 28. Abunge, Caroline
    et al.
    Coulthard, Sarah
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Connecting Marine Ecosystem Services to Human Well-being: Insights from Participatory Well-being Assessment in Kenya2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, Vol. 42, no 8, 1010-1021 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The linkage between ecosystems and human well-being is a focus of the conceptualization of ecosystem services as promoted by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. However, the actual nature of connections between ecosystems and the well-being of individuals remains complex and poorly understood. We conducted a series of qualitative focus groups with five different stakeholder groups connected to a small-scale Kenyan coastal fishery to understand (1) how well-being is understood within the community, and what is important for well-being, (2) how people's well-being has been affected by changes over the recent past, and (3) people's hopes and aspirations for their future fishery. Our results show that people conceive well-being in a diversity of ways, but that these can clearly map onto the MA framework. In particular, our research unpacks the freedoms and choices element of the framework and argues for greater recognition of these aspects of well-being in fisheries management in Kenya through, for example, more participatory governance processes.

  • 29.
    Abuzooda, Thana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Amini, Ahmad
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Graphite-based microextraction by packed sorbent for online extraction of beta-blockers from human plasma samples2015In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 992, 86-90 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work a new graphitic material (Carbon-XCOS) was used as a sorbent for microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS).The beta-blockers metoprolol and acebutolol in plasma samples were extracted and detected online using Carbon-MEPS syringe and liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Factors affecting the MEPS performance such as conditioning, washing and elution solutions were investigated. The validation of the bioanalytical method was performed using human plasma. The standard curve ranged from 10 to 2000 nM and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was set to 10 nM. The method validation showed good accuracy and precision for the quality control (QC) samples at three concentration levels (30, 800 and 1600 nM). The accuracy values of the QC samples were in the range of 86-108% (n = 18). The precision values of intra- and inter-day for QC samples ranged from 4.4% to 14.4% (RSD) for the both studied analytes. The coefficient of determination (R-2) values were >= 0.999 (n = 3).

  • 30.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The logic of fashion cycles2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3, e32541- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cultural traits exhibit volatile dynamics, commonly dubbed fashions or fads. Here we show that realistic fashion-like dynamics emerge spontaneously if individuals can copy others' preferences for cultural traits as well as traits themselves. We demonstrate this dynamics in simple mathematical models of the diffusion, and subsequent abandonment, of a single cultural trait which individuals may or may not prefer. We then simulate the coevolution between many cultural traits and the associated preferences, reproducing power-law frequency distributions of cultural traits (most traits are adopted by few individuals for a short time, and very few by many for a long time), as well as correlations between the rate of increase and the rate of decrease of traits (traits that increase rapidly in popularity are also abandoned quickly and vice versa). We also establish that alternative theories, that fashions result from individuals signaling their social status, or from individuals randomly copying each other, do not satisfactorily reproduce these empirical observations.

  • 31. Acevedo, Nathalie
    et al.
    Bornacelly, Adriana
    Mercado, Dilia
    Unneberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mittermann, Irene
    Valenta, Rudolf
    Kennedy, Malcolm
    Scheynius, Annika
    Caraballo, Luis
    Genetic Variants in CHIA and CHI3L1 Are Associated with the IgE Response to the Ascaris Resistance Marker ABA-1 and the Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 12016In: plos one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, e0167453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helminth infections and allergic diseases are associated with IgE hyperresponsiveness but the genetics of this phenotype remain to be defined. Susceptibility to Ascaris lumbricoides infection and antibody levels to this helminth are associated with polymorphisms in locus 13q33-34. We aimed to explore this and other genomic regions to identify genetic variants associated with the IgE responsiveness in humans. Forty-eight subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, with extreme values of specific IgE to Ascaris and ABA-1, a resistance marker of this nematode, were selected for targeted resequencing. Burden analyses were done comparing extreme groups for IgE values. One-hundred one SNPs were genotyped in 1258 individuals of two well-characterized populations from Colombia and Sweden. Two low-frequency coding variants in the gene encoding the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (CHIA rs79500525, rs139812869, tagged by rs10494133) were found enriched in high IgE responders to ABA-1 and confirmed by genetic association analyses. The SNP rs4950928 in the Chitinase 3 Like 1 gene (CHI3L1) was associated with high IgE to ABA-1 in Colombians and with high IgE to Bet v 1 in the Swedish population. CHIA rs10494133 and ABDH13 rs3783118 were associated with IgE responses to Ascaris. SNPs in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Member 13b gene (TNFSF13B) encoding the cytokine B cell activating Factor were associated with high levels of total IgE in both populations. This is the first report on the association between low-frequency and common variants in the chitinases- related genes CHIA and CHI3L1 with the intensity of specific IgE to ABA-1 in a population naturally exposed to Ascaris and with Bet v 1 in a Swedish population. Our results add new information about the genetic influences of human IgE responsiveness; since the genes encode for enzymes involved in the immune response to parasitic infections, they could be helpful for understanding helminth immunity and allergic responses. We also confirmed that TNFSF13B has an important and conserved role in the regulation of total IgE levels, which supports potential evolutionary links between helminth immunity and allergic response.

  • 32. Acharya, Kamal Prasad
    et al.
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Brunet, Jörg
    Chabrerie, Olivier
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Diekmann, Martin
    Hermy, Martin
    Kolb, Annette
    Lemke, Isgard
    Plue, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Verheyen, Kris
    Graae, Bente Jessen
    Latitudinal variation of life-history traits of an exotic and a native impatiens species in Europe2017In: Acta Oecologica, ISSN 1146-609X, E-ISSN 1873-6238, Vol. 81, 40-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the responses of invasive and native populations to environmental change is crucial for reliable predictions of invasions in the face of global change. While comparisons of responses across invasive species with different life histories have been performed before, comparing functional traits of congeneric native and invasive species may help to reveal driving factors associated with invasion. Here we compared morphological functional trait patterns of an invasive species (Impatiens parviflora) with its congeneric native species (I. noli-tangere) along an approximately 1600 km European latitudinal gradient from France (49 degrees 34'N) to Norway (63 degrees 40'N). Soil nitrogen was recorded during six weeks of the growing season, and light, soil moisture, and nutrient availability were estimated for each sampled population using community weighted means of indicator values for co-occurring species. Temperature data were gathered from nearby weather stations. Both the native and invasive species are taller at higher latitudes and this response is strongest in the invasive species. Seed mass and number of seeds per capsule increase in I. noli-tangere but decrease in I. parviflora towards higher latitudes. Surprisingly, plant height in the invasive I. parviflora decreases with increasing soil nitrogen availability. The latitudinal pattern in seed mass is positively related to temperature in I. noli-tangere and negatively in I. parviflora. Leaf area of both species decreases with increasing Ellenberg indicator values for nitrogen and light but increases with increasing soil moisture. Soil nitrogen concentrations and Ellenberg indicator values for nitrogen have significant positive (I. nolitangere) and negative (I. parviflora) effects on the number of seeds per capsule. Our results show that the native I. noli-tangere has efficient reproduction at its range edge while the invasive I. parviflora shows a marked decrease in seed size and seed number per capsule. These patterns are unrelated to the growth and obtained size of the plants: even low soil nitrogen availability in the north seemed not to limit plant growth and size. Our results suggest that the invasive I. parviflora tends to become more invasive at lower latitudes by producing heavier seeds and more seeds per capsule.

  • 33. Achidi, E. A.
    et al.
    Apinjoh, T. O.
    Mbunwe, E.
    Besingi, R.
    Yafi, C.
    Awah, N. Wenjighe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Ajua, A.
    Anchang, J. K.
    Febrile status, malarial parasitaemia and gastro-intestinal helminthiases in schoolchildren resident at different altitudes, in south-western Cameroon2008In: Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, ISSN 0003-4983, Vol. 102, no 2, 103-118 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the many areas where human malaria and helminthiases are co-endemic, schoolchildren often harbour the heaviest infections and suffer much of the associated morbidity, especially when co-infected. In one such area, the Buea district, in south-western Cameroon, two cross-sectional surveys, together covering 263 apparently healthy schoolchildren aged 4-12 years, were recently conducted. The prevalences of fever, malarial parasitaemia and intestinal helminth infections, the seroprevalences of anti-Plasmodium falciparum IgG and IgE and anti-glycosylphosphatidylinositol (anti-GPI) IgG, plasma concentrations of total IgE, and the incidence of anaemia were all investigated. The mean (S.D.) age of the study children was 7.56 (1.82) years. Overall, 156 (59.3%) of the children were found parasitaemic, with a geometric mean parasitaemia of 565 parasites/mu l. Parasitaemia and fever were significantly associated (P=0.042). The children who lived at low altitude, attending schools that lay 400-650 m above sea level, had significantly higher parasitaemias than their high-altitude counterparts (P < 0.01). At low altitude, the children attending government schools had significantly higher parasitaemias than their mission-school counterparts (P=0.010). Of the 31 children (11.9%) found anaemic, 22 (70.4%) had mild anaemia and none had severe anaemia. A significant negative correlation (r=-0.224; P=0.005) was observed between haemoglobin concentration and level of parasitaemia. Infection with Plasmodium appeared to reduce erythrocyte counts (P=0.045), a condition that was exacerbated by co-infection with helminths (P=0.035). Plasma concentrations of total IgE were higher in the children found to be excreting helminth eggs than in those who appeared helminth-free, while levels of anti-P. falciparum IgE were higher in the children with low-grade parasitaemias than in those with more intense parasitaemias. Levels of anti-GPI IgG increased with age and were relatively high in the children who lived at low altitude and in those who were aparasitaemic. The survey results confirm that asymptomatic malarial parasitaemia frequently co-exists with helminth infections in schoolchildren and indicate links with fever, altitude and school type. Immunoglobulin E may play a role in immune protection against helminthiasis whereas anti-GPI antibodies may be important in the development of antimalarial immunity in such children. In Cameroon, as in other areas with endemic malaria, control programmes to reduce the prevalences of infections with intestinal helminths and malarial parasites in schoolchildren, which may effectively reduce the incidence of anaemia, are clearly needed.

  • 34.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Global fisheries - threats and opportunities2009In: Fisheries, sustainablity and development: fifty-two authors on coexistence and development of fisheries and aquaculture in developing and developed countries / [ed] Per Wramner, Hans Ackefors et al, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och lantbruksakademien , 2009, 35-68- p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    The evolution of a worldwide shrimp industry2009In: World Aquaculture, ISSN 1041-5602, Vol. 40, no 3, 46-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Är det politikerna eller fiskenäringen som styr fisket?2008In: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, Vol. 147, no 2, 36-43 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37. Adam, Birgit
    et al.
    Klawonn, Isabell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Svedén, Jenny B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Bergkvist, Johanna
    Nahar, Nurun
    Walve, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Littmann, Sten
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Lavik, Gaute
    Kuypers, Marcel M. M.
    Ploug, Helle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    N2-fixation, ammonium release and N-transfer to the microbial and classical food web within a plankton community2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 10, no 2, 450-459 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the role of N2-fixation by the colony-forming cyanobacterium, Aphanizomenon spp., for the plankton community and N-budget of the N-limited Baltic Sea during summer by using stable isotope tracers combined with novel secondary ion mass spectrometry, conventional mass spectrometry and nutrient analysis. When incubated with 15N2Aphanizomenon spp. showed a strong 15N-enrichment implying substantial 15N2-fixation. Intriguingly, Aphanizomenon did not assimilate tracers of 15NH4+ from the surrounding water. These findings are in line with model calculations that confirmed a negligible N-source by diffusion-limited NH4+ fluxes to Aphanizomenon colonies at low bulk concentrations (<250 nm) as compared with N2-fixation within colonies. No N2-fixation was detected in autotrophic microorganisms <5 μm, which relied on NH4+uptake from the surrounding water. Aphanizomenon released about 50% of its newly fixed N2 as NH4+. However, NH4+ did not accumulate in the water but was transferred to heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms as well as to diatoms (Chaetoceros sp.) and copepods with a turnover time of ~5 h. We provide direct quantitative evidence that colony-formingAphanizomenon releases about half of its recently fixed N2 as NH4+, which is transferred to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic plankton forming the basis of the food web in the plankton community. Transfer of newly fixed nitrogen to diatoms and copepods furthermore implies a fast export to shallow sediments via fast-sinking fecal pellets and aggregates. Hence, N2-fixing colony-forming cyanobacteria can have profound impact on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical processes at shorter time scales (hours to days) than previously thought.

  • 38. Adase, Christopher A.
    et al.
    Draheim, Roger R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Manson, Michael D.
    The Residue Composition of the Aromatic Anchor of the Second Transmembrane Helix Determines the Signaling Properties of the Aspartate/Maltose Chemoreceptor Tar of Escherichia coli2012In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 51, no 9, 1925-1932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Repositioning of the tandem aromatic residues (Trp-209 and Tyr-210) at the cytoplasmic end of the second transmembrane helix (TM2) modulates the signal output of the aspartate/maltose chemoreceptor of Escherichia coli (Tar(Ec)). Here, we directly assessed the effect of the residue composition of the aromatic anchor by studying the function of a library of Tar(Ec) variants that possess all possible combinations of Ala, Phe, Tyr, and Trp at positions 209 and 210. We identified three important properties of the aromatic anchor. First, a Trp residue at position 209 was required to maintain clockwise (CW) signal output in the absence of adaptive methylation, but adaptive methylation restored the ability of all of the mutant receptors to generate CW rotation. Second, when the aromatic anchor was replaced with tandem Ala residues, signaling was less compromised than when an Ala residue occupied position 209 and an aromatic residue occupied position 210. Finally, when Trp was: present at position 209, the identity of the residue at position 210 had little effect on baseline signal output or aspartate chemotaxis, although maltose taxis was significantly affected by some substitutions at position 210. All of the mutant receptors we constructed supported some level of aspartate and maltose taxis in semisolid agar swim plates, but those without Trp at position 209 were overmethylated in their baseline signaling state. These results show the importance of the cytoplasmic aromatic anchor of TM2 in maintaining the baseline Tar(Ec) signal output and responsiveness to attractant signaling.

  • 39. Adase, Christopher A.
    et al.
    Draheim, Roger R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Goethe University .
    Rueda, Garrett
    Desai, Raj
    Manson, Michael D.
    Residues at the Cytoplasmic End of Transmembrane Helix 2 Determine the Signal Output of the Tar(Ec) Chemoreceptor2013In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 52, no 16, 2729-2738 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Baseline signal output and communication between the periplasmic and cytoplasmic domains of the Escherichia colt aspartate chemoreceptor Tar(Ec) are both strongly influenced by residues at the C-terminus of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2). In particular, the cytoplasmic aromatic anchor, composed of residues Trp-209 and Tyr-210 in wild type Tar(Ec) is important for determining the CheA kinase-stimulating activity of the receptor and its ability to respond to chemoeffector-induced stimuli. Here, we have studied the effect on Tar(Ec) function of the six residue sequence at positions 207-212 Moving various combinations of aromatic residues among these positions generates substantial changes M receptor activity. Trp has the largest effect on function, both in maintaining normal activity and in altering activity when it is moved. Tyr has a weaker effect, and Phe has the weakest; however, all three aromatic residues can alter signal output when they are placed in novel positions. We also find that Gly-211 plays an important role in receptor function, perhaps because of the flexibility it introduces into the TM2-HAMP domain connector. The conservation of this Gly residue in the high-abundance chemoreceptors of E. coli and Salmonella enterica suggests that it may be important for the nuanced, bidirectional transmembrane signaling that occurs in these proteins.

  • 40.
    Adler, Jeremy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Cell Biology.
    Parmryd, Ingela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Cell Biology.
    Plasma membrane topology and membrane models2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Adler, Jeremy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Cell Biology.
    Shevchuk, A
    Novak, P
    Korchev, Y
    Parmryd, I
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Cell Biology.
    Single Particle Tracking in 2D Produces Gibberish: A Solution2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Adlerz, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Holback, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Multhaup, Gerd
    Iverfeldt, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    IGF-1-induced Processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein Family Is Mediated by Different Signaling Pathways2007In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 282, no 14, 10203-10209 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mammalian amyloid precursor protein (APP) protein family consists of the APP and the amyloid precursor-like proteins 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2). The neurotoxic amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) originates from APP, which is the only member of this protein family implicated in Alzheimer disease. However, the three homologous proteins have been proposed to be processed in similar ways and to have essential and overlapping functions. Therefore, it is also important to take into account the effects on the processing and function of the APP-like proteins in the development of therapeutic drugs aimed at decreasing the production of Abeta. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have been shown to regulate APP processing and the levels of Abeta in the brain. In the present study, we show that IGF-1 increases alpha-secretase processing of endogenous APP and also increases ectodomain shedding of APLP1 and APLP2 in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We also investigated the role of different IGF-1-induced signaling pathways, using specific inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Our results indicate that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is involved in ectodomain shedding of APP and APLP1, but not APLP2, and that MAPK is involved only in the ectodomain shedding of APLP1.

  • 43.
    Aeppli, Christoph
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Bastviken, David
    Andersson, Per
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Chlorine Isotope Effects and Composition of Naturally Produced Organochlorines from Chloroperoxidases, Flavin-Dependent Halogenases, and in Forest Soil2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 13, 6864-6871 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of stable chlorine isotopic signatures (delta Cl-37) of organochlorine compounds has been suggested as a tool to determine both their origins and transformations in the environment. Here we investigated the delta Cl-37 fractionation of two important pathways for enzymatic natural halogenation: chlorination by chloroperoxidase (CPO) and flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH). Phenolic products of CPO were highly Cl-37 depleted (delta Cl-37 = -12.6 +/- 0.9 parts per thousand); significantly more depleted than all known industrially produced organochlorine compounds (delta Cl-37 = -7 to +6 parts per thousand). In contrast, four FDH products did not exhibit any observable isotopic shifts (delta Cl-37 = -0.3 +/- 0.6 parts per thousand). We attributed the different isotopic effect to the distinctly different chlorination mechanisms employed by the two enzymes. Furthermore, the delta Cl-37 in bulk organochlorines extracted from boreal forest soils were only slightly depleted in Cl-37 relative to inorganic Cl. In contrast to previous suggestions that CPO plays a key role in production of soil organochlorines, this observation points to the additional involvement of either other chlorination pathways, or that dechlorination of naturally produced organochlorines can neutralize delta Cl-37 shifts caused by CPO chlorination. Overall, this study demonstrates that chlorine isotopic signatures are highly useful to understand sources and cycling of organochlorines in nature. Furthermore, this study presents delta Cl-37 values of FDH products as well of bulk organochlorines extracted from pristine forest soil for the first time.

  • 44.
    Aeppli, Christoph
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Tysklind, Mats
    Holmstrand, Henry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Use of Cl and C Isotopic Fractionation to Identify Degradation and Sources of Polychlorinated Phenols: Mechanistic Study and Field Application2013In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 47, no 2, 790-797 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of chlorinated phenols (CPs) as a wood preservative has led to numerous contaminated sawmill sites. However, it remains challenging to assess the extent of in situ degradation of CPs. We evaluated the use of compound-specific chlorine and carbon isotope analysis (Cl- and C-CSLA) to assess CP biotransformation. In a laboratory system, we measured isotopic fractionation during oxidative 2,4,6-trichlorophenol dechlorination by representative soil enzymes (C. fumago chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and laccase from T. versicolor). Using a mathematical model, the validity of the Rayleigh approach to evaluate apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE) was confirmed. A small but significant Cl-AKIE of 1.0022 +/- 0.0006 was observed for all three enzymes, consistent with a reaction pathway via a cationic radical species. For carbon, a slight inverse isotope effect was observed (C-AKIE = 0.9945 +/- 0.0019). This fractionation behavior is clearly distinguishable from reported reductive dechlorination mechanisms. Based on these results we then assessed degradation and apportioned different types of technical CP mixtures used at two former sawmill sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study that makes use of two-element CSIA to study sources and transformation of CPs in the environment.

  • 45. Aguirre, A. A.
    et al.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Mörner, T.
    Health evaluation of arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs in Sweden2000In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 31, no 1, 36-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hematologic. serum biochemistry, and serum cortisol reference ranges were established and tonsil/rectal bacterial and fecal parasite examinations were performed on 21 wild arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs during July 1996. Several of the hematologic and serum biochemistry values fell within normal ranges for other wild canids or domestic dogs of the same age class. Serum alanine transaminase and creatine phosphokinase values were significantly higher in the youngest cubs. Proteus vulgaris and Escherichia coli were isolated from both tonsilar and rectal swabs of several cubs in all dens. The most common gastrointestinal parasite ova were Toxascaris leonina (59%), Isospora spp. (52%), Uncinaria stenocephala (33%), and Capillaria spp. (26%). Prevalence of T. leonina differed significantly between dens and between age groups. Hematologic and serum biochemistry values and degree of parasitism may be indicators of health, stress, and nutritional status of arctic foxes.

  • 46. Aguirre, A. Alonso
    et al.
    Principe, B.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Mörner, Torsten
    Field anesthesia of wild arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs in the Swedish lapland using medetomidine-ketamine-atipamezole2000In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 31, no 2, 244-246 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A safe and effective anesthetic regime for use in arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs was developed. During July 1996, six free-ranging 6-8-wk-old cubs were captured near their den in Vindelfjallen Nature Reserve, Sweden. Medetomidine and ketamine HCl, followed by atipamezole, were selected for the anesthetic trial because of the well-documented safety and efficacy of this drug combination in a broad range of species. The dosage regimen used was 50 mu g/kg medetomidine combined with 2.5 mg/kg ketamine followed by reversal with 250 mu g/kg atipamezole. induction was rapid, with a mean induction time of 1 min and 32 sec (range: 58-150 sec). The cubs were anesthetized for a mean time of 18 +/- 5 min (range: 13-25 min). Serially recorded heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, and pulse oximetry were stable throughout the anesthetic period for all cubs. Anesthetic depth was suitable for safe handling and minor clinical procedures, including venipuncture. Following atipamezole, all cubs were standing within 12 +/- 7 min (range: 5-24 min) and fully recovered at 27 +/- 5 min (range: 19-36 min). This information will be useful for future captive breeding and management programs involving the endangered arctic fox.

  • 47. Ah-King, Malin
    Phylogenetic analyses of parental care evolution2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden; University of California, USA.
    Gowaty, Patricia Adair
    A conceptual review of mate choice: stochastic demography, within-sex phenotypic plasticity, and individual flexibility2016In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 14, 4607-4642 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mate choice hypotheses usually focus on trait variation of chosen individuals. Recently, mate choice studies have increasingly attended to the environmental circumstances affecting variation in choosers' behavior and choosers' traits. We reviewed the literature on phenotypic plasticity in mate choice with the goal of exploring whether phenotypic plasticity can be interpreted as individual flexibility in the context of the switch point theorem, SPT (Gowaty and Hubbell ). We found >3000 studies; 198 were empirical studies of within-sex phenotypic plasticity, and sixteen showed no evidence of mate choice plasticity. Most studies reported changes from choosy to indiscriminate behavior of subjects. Investigators attributed changes to one or more causes including operational sex ratio, adult sex ratio, potential reproductive rate, predation risk, disease risk, chooser's mating experience, chooser's age, chooser's condition, or chooser's resources. The studies together indicate that choosiness of potential mates is environmentally and socially labile, that is, induced - not fixed - in the choosy sex with results consistent with choosers' intrinsic characteristics or their ecological circumstances mattering more to mate choice than the traits of potential mates. We show that plasticity-associated variables factor into the simpler SPT variables. We propose that it is time to complete the move from questions about within-sex plasticity in the choosy sex to between- and within-individual flexibility in reproductive decision-making of both sexes simultaneously. Currently, unanswered empirical questions are about the force of alternative constraints and opportunities as inducers of individual flexibility in reproductive decision-making, and the ecological, social, and developmental sources of similarities and differences between individuals. To make progress, we need studies (1) of simultaneous and symmetric attention to individual mate preferences and subsequent behavior in both sexes, (2) controlled for within-individual variation in choice behavior as demography changes, and which (3) report effects on fitness from movement of individual's switch points.

  • 49. Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Sex in an Evolutionary Perspective: Just Another Reaction Norm2010In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 37, no 4, 234-246 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is common to refer to all sorts of clear-cut differences between the sexes as something that is biologically almost inevitable. Although this does not reflect the status of evolutionary theory on sex determination and sexual dimorphism, it is probably a common view among evolutionary biologists as well, because of the impact of sexual selection theory. To get away from thinking about biological sex and traits associated with a particular sex as something static, it should be recognized that in an evolutionary perspective sex can be viewed as a reaction norm, with sex attributes being phenotypically plastic. Sex determination itself is fundamentally plastic, even when it is termed "genetic". The phenotypic expression of traits that are statistically associated with a particular sex always has a plastic component. This plasticity allows for much more variation in the expression of traits according to sex and more overlap between the sexes than is typically acknowledged. Here we review the variation and frequency of evolutionary changes in sex, sex determination and sex roles and conclude that sex in an evolutionary time-frame is extremely variable. We draw on recent findings in sex determination mechanisms, empirical findings of morphology and behaviour as well as genetic and developmental models to explore the concept of sex as a reaction norm. From this point of view, sexual differences are not expected to generally fall into neat, discrete, pre-determined classes. It is important to acknowledge this variability in order to increase objectivity in evolutionary research.

  • 50. Ahlandsberg, Staffan
    Metabolic engineering of starch synthesis in barley2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Starch is an important industrial raw material both for food and non-food purposes. In plants, starch is deposited in the leaf and in the storage tissues such as seed endosperm, roots or tubers. Starch is a glucose polymer, and its synthesis involves four groups of enzymes, ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), and starch debranching enzymes (DBE). In barley, four isoforms of SBE have been identified and the temporal and spatial expression of their genes (sbe) has been studied in our lab.

    The long-term objective of our research is to produce novel starches in planta for industrial applications. This requires the transformation of barley in order to produce transgenic plants with altered activity for one or more sbe genes. Using a plant-optimized version of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as the only marker we produced a transgenic Nordic elite cultivar of barley in 1999. The usefulness of GFP as a marker has also been applied in various transient experiments and for this reason a set of monocotyledonous expression vectors has been developed. Using these vectors, the spatial expression pattern of the sbeII genes has been investigated.

    The sbeIIa and sbeIIb genes are differentially transcribed during barley seed development. The sbeIIb gene is expressed exclusively in the endosperm while the sbeIIa gene is expressed also in embryonic and vegetative tissues. The tissue specific regulation of the sbeII genes was hown to be executed via a repressor protein acting on a cis element located in the second intron of the sbeIIb gene. We also suggest that the repression is controlled by the local sugar concentration in the barley seed endosperm.

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