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  • 1.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

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    Backchannels and breathing
  • 2. Aayesha,
    et al.
    Qureshi, Muhammad Bilal
    Afzaal, Muhammad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Qureshi, Muhammad Shuaib
    Fayaz, Muhammad
    Machine learning-based EEG signals classification model for epileptic seizure detection2021In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, Vol. 80, p. 17849-17877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of epileptic seizures by classifying electroencephalography (EEG) signals into ictal and interictal classes is a demanding challenge, because it identifies the seizure and seizure-free states of an epileptic patient. In previous works, several machine learning-based strategies were introduced to investigate and interpret EEG signals for the purpose of their accurate classification. However, non-linear and non-stationary characteristics of EEG signals make it complicated to get complete information about these dynamic biomedical signals. In order to address this issue, this paper focuses on extracting the most discriminating and distinguishing features of seizure EEG recordings to develop an approach that employs both fuzzy-based and traditional machine learning algorithms for epileptic seizure detection. The proposed framework classifies unknown EEG signal segments into ictal and interictal classes. The model is validated using empirical evaluation on two benchmark datasets, namely the Bonn and Children's Hospital of Boston-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (CHB-MIT) datasets. The obtained results show that in both cases, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) and Fuzzy Rough Nearest Neighbor (FRNN) give the highest classification accuracy scores, with improved sensitivity and specificity percentages.

  • 3. Abbas, Sk Jahir
    et al.
    Ramacharyulu, P. V. R. K.
    Lo, Hsin-Hsi
    Ali, Sk Imran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ke, Shyue-Chu
    A catalytic approach to synthesis of PLP analogs and other environmental protocols in a single handed CaO/TiO2 green nanoparticle2017In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 210, p. 276-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As our precursory stage we have focus straight forward on clean catalytic approach for the production of C3 substituted pyridoxal-5 '-phosphate analogues of vitamin B6, and other environmental protocols like photocatalytic activity, green fossil fuels and c-c coupling using efficient biocompatible eggshell related unrivalled materials which show versatility of the catalytic effect on different inorganic support. The eggshell immobilized nanoparticles have encouraging relevance in creation of new molecules and can advantageously be studied by various spectroscopic, thermal and elemental analyses like powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The elucidate nature of nanoparticles offer: more active site acts as lewis acid, vacancies on the catalyst surface and good to better yield of C3 substituted deoxy and 2-nor deoxy coenzyme pyridoxine (PN), coupling products propargylamines (PA), photo degrading enhancement of MB and nucleophilic substituted fatty acid (BD). This enzyme cofactor explore molecular synthons to synthetic equivalent: 3-deoxy and 2-nor-3-deoxy pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxal oxime (P0), pyridoxamine (PM) and mono phosphate derivative of 3-deoxyPM, 3-deoxyPL respectively and chemistry of selective oxidation and schiff base mechanism was studied and complemented through combined experimental and theoretical molecular orbital calculation consequently. The heterogeneous catalyst has strong selective ability towards selective reducing pyridine diester, bioactive intermediates substances and holds vast potential towards separation for the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable green fossil fuels. The catalyst including environmental concern is reapplicable and strong impressive that can unfold the space of worthy metal component widely and facilitate the scope to take a vital role in different fileds like catalysis, biochemistry, nanoscience, energy and materials science.

  • 4. Abbasi, R.
    et al.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Deoskar, Kunal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jansson, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zhang, Z.
    A convolutional neural network based cascade reconstruction for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory2021In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 16, no 7, article id P07041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued improvements on existing reconstruction methods are vital to the success of high-energy physics experiments, such as the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. In IceCube, further challenges arise as the detector is situated at the geographic South Pole where computational resources are limited. However, to perform real-time analyses and to issue alerts to telescopes around the world, powerful and fast reconstruction methods are desired. Deep neural networks can be extremely powerful, and their usage is computationally inexpensive once the networks are trained. These characteristics make a deep learning-based approach an excellent candidate for the application in IceCube. A reconstruction method based on convolutional architectures and hexagonally shaped kernels is presented. The presented method is robust towards systematic uncertainties in the simulation and has been tested on experimental data. In comparison to standard reconstruction methods in IceCube, it can improve upon the reconstruction accuracy, while reducing the time necessary to run the reconstruction by two to three orders of magnitude.

  • 5. Abbasi, R.
    et al.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Deoskar, Kunal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jansson, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zhelnin, P.
    Framework and tools for the simulation and analysis of the radio emission from air showers at IceCube2022In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 17, no 6, article id P06026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Surface Enhancement of the IceTop air-shower array will include the addition of radio antennas and scintillator panels, co-located with the existing ice-Cherenkov tanks and covering an area of about 1 km(2). Together, these will increase the sensitivity of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory to the electromagnetic and muonic components of cosmic-ray-induced air showers at the South Pole. The inclusion of the radio technique necessitates an expanded set of simulation and analysis tools to explore the radio-frequency emission from air showers in the 70 MHz to 350 MHz band. In this paper we describe the software modules that have been developed to work with time-and frequency-domain information within IceCube's existing software framework, IceTray, which is used by the entire IceCube collaboration. The software includes a method by which air-shower simulation, generated using CoREAS, can be reused via waveform interpolation, thus overcoming a significant computational hurdle in the field.

  • 6. Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Olander, Lars
    Olofsson, Ulf
    Sellgren, Ulf
    A pin-on-disc study of the rate of airborne wear particle emissions from railway braking materials2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 284, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigates the characteristics of particles generated from the wear of braking materials, and provides an applicable index for measuring and comparing wear particle emissions. A pin-on-disc tribometer equipped with particle measurement instruments was used. The number concentration, size, morphology, and mass concentration of generated particles were investigated and reported for particles 10 nm-32 mu m in diameter. The particles were also collected on filters and investigated using EDS and SEM. The effects of wear mechanisms on particle morphology and changes in particle concentration are discussed. A new index, the airborne wear particle emission rate (AWPER), is suggested that could be used in legislation to control non-exhaust emissions from transport modes, particularly rail transport.

  • 7. Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    Olander, Lars
    Larsson, Christina
    Olofsson, Ulf
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    A field test study of airborne wear particles from a running regional train2012In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part F, journal of rail and rapid transit, ISSN 0954-4097, E-ISSN 2041-3017, Vol. 226, no 1, p. 95-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalable airborne particles have inverse health effects. In railways, mechanical brakes, the wheel–rail contact, current collectors, ballast, sleepers, and masonry structures yield particulate matter. Field tests examined a Swedish track using a train instrumented with particle measurement devices, brake pad temperature sensors, and speed and brake sensors. The main objective of this field test was to study the characteristics of particles generated from disc brakes on a running train with an on-board measuring set-up. Two airborne particle sampling points were designated, one near a pad–rotor disc brake contact and a second under the frame, not near a mechanical brake or the wheel–rail contact; the numbers and size distributions of the particles detected were registered and evaluated under various conditions (e.g. activating/deactivating electrical brakes or negotiating curves). During braking, three speed/temperature-dependent particle peaks were identified in the fine region, representing particles 280, 350, and 600 nm in diameter. In the coarse region, a peak was discerned for particles 3–6 µm in diameter. Effects of brake pad temperature on particle size distribution were also investigated. Results indicate that the 280 nm peak increased with increasing temperature, and that electrical braking significantly reduced airborne particle numbers. Field emission scanning electron microscope images captured particles sizing down to 50 nm. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry results indicated that Fe, Cu, Zn, Al, Ca, and Mg were the main elements constituting the particles.

  • 8. Abd El-Hakim, Abou El Fettouh Abd El Moneim
    et al.
    Haroun, Ahmed Abd Allah
    Rabie, Abdel Gawad Mohamed
    Ali, Gomaa Abdelgawad Mohammed
    Abdelrahim, Mohamed Yahia Marei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Helwan University, Egypt.
    Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) by incorporating modified CaCO3 nanoparticles as a filler2019In: Turkish journal of chemistry, ISSN 1300-0527, E-ISSN 1303-6130, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 750-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) (CPVC)/calcium carbonate nanocomposites were successfully prepared by the incorporation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles into the CPVC matrix. The compatibility between the two phases was obtained by surface modification of the CaCO3 nanoparticles with stearic acid, leading to improved material performance. The effects of the addition of different amounts of CaCO3 nanoparticles to the CPVC on the thermal, mechanical, and morphological characteristics of the CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposites were investigated. The thermal stability of the CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposites was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, the surface texture of the CPVC and the dispersion of the CaCO3 were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Important enhancements in the thermal and mechanical properties of the modified CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposites were obtained by incorporating different amounts (2.00%, 3.75%, and 5.75%) of surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles within the CPVC polymer matrix. The results reveal that 3.75% of CaCO3 was the optimum amount, where the CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposite shows the highest impact strength, the highest tensile strength, the highest thermal stability, and the lowest elongation percentage. Replacement of the commercial impact modifier used in industry with the prepared surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles for the development of CPVC was successfully achieved.

  • 9.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Assiut University, Egypt.
    Surfactant assisted synthesis of hierarchical porous metal-organic frameworks nanosheets2019In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 30, no 43, article id 435601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two-dimensional metal-organic frameworks show increasing research attention due to their unique properties including tunable thickness, simple packing into a film and membrane, and high surface-to-volume atom ratios. A bottom-up synthesis strategy using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide for the synthesis of copper-benzenedicarboxylate (Cu(BDC)) nanosheets is reported. The method offers the synthesis of hierarchical porous Cu(BDC) lamellae with micrometer lateral dimensions, and nanometer thickness (100-150 nm). Electron microscope (scanning and transmission), and N-2 adsorption isotherms confirm the formation of lamellae Cu(BDC) with mesopore size of 5-80 nm. The material has thermal stability up to 400 degrees C with good chemical stability in several organic solvents. However, the material transforms to another phase (Cu(BDC)(H2O)(2)) when soaked in water and alcohols. The transformation reduces crystal size and offers the formation of hydrogen bond resulting in an increase in the sorption of CO2 by similar to 10% compared to the pristine material Cu(BDC).

  • 10.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Assiut University, Egypt.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Cellulose-Based Materials for Water Remediation: Adsorption, Catalysis, and Antifouling2021In: Frontiers in Chemical Engineering, E-ISSN 2673-2718, Vol. 3, article id 790314Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose-based materials have been advanced technologies that used in water remediation. They exhibit several advantages being the most abundant biopolymer in nature, high biocompatibility, and contain several functional groups. Cellulose can be prepared in several derivatives including nanomaterials such as cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), and TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNF). The presence of functional groups such as carboxylic and hydroxyls groups can be modified or grafted with organic moieties offering extra functional groups customizing for specific applications. These functional groups ensure the capability of cellulose biopolymers to be modified with nanoparticles such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), graphene oxide (GO), silver (Ag) nanoparticles, and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. Thus, they can be applied for water remediation via removing water pollutants including heavy metal ions, organic dyes, drugs, and microbial species. Cellulose-based materials can be also used for removing microorganisms being active as membranes or antibacterial agents. They can proceed into various forms such as membranes, sheets, papers, foams, aerogels, and filters. This review summarized the applications of cellulose-based materials for water remediation via methods such as adsorption, catalysis, and antifouling. The high performance of cellulose-based materials as well as their simple processing methods ensure the high potential for water remediation.

     

  • 11.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Assiut University, Egypt.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Cellulose-zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (CelloZIFs) for multifunctional environmental remediation: Adsorption and catalytic degradation2021In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 426, article id 131733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The crystal growth of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) on biopolymers such as cellulose is a promising method for obtaining hybrid materials that combinenatural and synthetic materials. Cellulose derivative viz. 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxylradical (TEMPO)-mediated oxidized nanocellulose (TOCNF) was used to modulate the crystal growth of ZIF-8 (denoted as CelloZIF-8) and ZIF-L (CelloZIF-L). The synthesis procedure occurred in water at room temperature with and without NaOH. The reaction parameters such as the sequence of the chemical's addition and reactant molar ratio were investigated. The phases formed during the crystal growth were monitored. The data analysis ensured the presence of zinc hydroxide nitrate nanosheets modified TOCNF during the crystallization of CelloZIFs. These phases were converted to pure phases ofCelloZIF-8 and CelloZIF-L. The resultant CelloZIFs materials were used for the adsorption ofcarbon dioxide (CO2), metal ions, and dyes. The materials exhibited high selectivity with reasonable efficiency (100%) toward the adsorption of anionic dyes such as methyl blue (MeB). They can also be used as a catalyst for dye degradation via hydrogenation with an efficiency of 100%. CelloZIF crystals can be loaded into a filter paper for simple, fast, and selective adsorption of MeB from a dye mixture. The materials are recyclable for five cycles without significant loss of their performance. The mechanisms of adsorption and catalysis were also investigated.

  • 12.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Assiut University, Egypt; The British University in Egypt (BUE), Egypt.
    Sultan, Sahar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Three-Dimensional Printing of Cellulose/Covalent Organic Frameworks (CelloCOFs) for CO2 Adsorption and Water Treatment2023In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 15, no 51, p. 59795-59805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of porous organic polymers, specifically covalent organic frameworks (COFs), has facilitated the advancement of numerous applications. Nevertheless, the limited availability of COFs solely in powder form imposes constraints on their potential applications. Furthermore, it is worth noting that COFs tend to undergo aggregation, leading to a decrease in the number of active sites available within the material. This work presents a comprehensive methodology for the transformation of a COF into three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds using the technique of 3D printing. As part of the 3D printing process, a composite material called CelloCOF was created by combining cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), sodium alginate, and COF materials (i.e., COF-1 and COF-2). The intervention successfully mitigated the agglomeration of the COF nanoparticles, resulting in the creation of abundant active sites that can be effectively utilized for adsorption purposes. The method of 3D printing can be described as a simple and basic procedure that can be adapted to accommodate hierarchical porous materials with distinct micro- and macropore regimes. This technology demonstrates versatility in its use across a range of COF materials. The adsorption capacities of 3D CelloCOF materials were evaluated for three different adsorbates: carbon dioxide (CO2), heavy metal ions, and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). The results showed that the materials exhibited adsorption capabilities of 19.9, 7.4–34, and 118.5–410.8 mg/g for CO2, PFOS, and heavy metals, respectively. The adsorption properties of the material were found to be outstanding, exhibiting a high degree of recyclability and exceptional selectivity. Based on our research findings, it is conceivable that the utilization of custom-designed composites based on COFs could present new opportunities in the realm of water and air purification.

  • 13. Abdullah, Omed Gh.
    et al.
    Tahir, Dana A.
    Kadir, K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Kurdistan Institution for Strategic Studies and Scientific Research, Iraq.
    Optical and structural investigation of synthesized PVA/PbS nanocomposites2015In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 6939-6944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer nanocomposite based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and lead sulfide (PbS) in the average radius of (1.88-2.23) nm, have been synthesized using the chemical reduction rote and solution casting technique for different concentrations of PbS. The characterization of the polymer nanocomposite films were carried out using UV-visible spectroscopy, SEM, and XRD. The effect of various concentration of PbS NP on the optical properties of the composite has been studied to understand the optimum conditions for the synthesis process. The nanocomposite film shows high UV and visible light absorptions in the wavelength range of (200-500) nm, which correspond to the characteristics of the PbS NPs. The significant decreasing trend of the direct allowed band gap of the nanocomposite was observed upon increasing the Pb source concentration, from (6.27 eV) for pure PVA to (2.34 eV) for 0.04 M PbS concentration, which is much higher than the energy gap of bulk PbS value (0.41 eV). The calculated values of the static refractive index of Cauchy dispersion model were in the range of (1.09-1.20). X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the cubic nanocrystalline PbS phase formation.

  • 14.
    Abebe, Mihret
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spherical and Porous Particles of Calcium Carbonate Synthesized with Food Friendly Polymer Additives2015In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 3609-3616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous calcium carbonate particles were synthesized by adding solutions of Ca2+ to solutions of CO32- containing polymeric additives. Under optimized conditions well-defined aggregates of the anhydrous polymorph vaterite formed. A typical sample of these micrometer-sized aggregates had: a pore volume of 0.1 cm(3)/g, a pore width of similar to 10 nm, and a specific surface area of similar to 25-30 m(2)/ g. Only one mixing Order (calcium to carbonate) allowed the formation of vaterite, which was ascribed to the buffering capacity and relatively high pH of the CO32- solution. Rapid addition of the calcium chloride solution and rapid stirring promoted the formation of vaterite, due to the high supersaturation levels achieved. With xanthan gum, porous and micrometer-sized vaterite aggregates could be synthesized over a wide range of synthetic conditions. For the Other food grade polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), methylcellulose (MC), and sodium carboxyl methylcellulose, several intensive and extensive synthetic parameters had to be optimized to obtain pure vaterite and porous aggregates. HPMC and MC allowed well-defined spherical micrometer-sited particles to form. We expect that these spherical and porous particles of vaterite could be relevant to model studies as well as a controlled delivery of particularly large molecules.

  • 15. Abel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Nybom, Inna
    Maenpaa, Kimmo
    Hale, Sarah E.
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway.
    Akkanen, Jarkko
    Mixing and capping techniques for activated carbon based sediment remediation Efficiency and adverse effects for Lumbriculus variegatus2017In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 114, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activated carbon (AC) has been proven to be highly effective for the in-situ remediation of sediments contaminated with a wide range of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, adverse biological effects, especially to benthic organisms, can accompany this promising remediation potential. In this study, we compare both the remediation potential and the biological effects of several AC materials for two application methods: mixing with sediment (MIX) at doses of 0.1 and 1.0% based on sediment dw and thin layer capping (TLC) with 0.6 and 1.2 kg AC/m(2). Significant dose dependent reductions in PCB bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus of 35-93% in MIX treatments were observed. Contaminant uptake in TLC treatments was reduced by up to 78% and differences between the two applied doses were small. Correspondingly, significant adverse effects were observed for L. variegatus whenever AC was present in the sediment. The lowest application dose of 0.1% AC in the MIX system reduced L variegatus growth, and 1.0% AC led to a net loss of organism biomass. All TLC treatments let to a loss of biomass in the test organism. Furthermore, mortality was observed with 1.2 kg ACim(2) doses of pure AC for the TLC treatment. The addition of clay (Kaolinite) to the TLC treatments prevented mortality, but did not decrease the loss in biomass. While TLC treatments pose a less laborious alternative for AC amendments in the field, the results of this study show that it has lower remediation potential and could be more harmful to the benthic fauna.

  • 16.
    Abougazar, Eman Silmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
      Barriers to equal access to eHealth in Stockholm  : A qualitative study2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim behind this study was to observe and understand barriers to access the eHealth system equally. The study was conducted in Stockholm based on qualitative data in which semi- structured interviews were conducted among 15 interviewees from different localities of Stockholm. The findings from the collected data revealed that language barriers, lack of knowledge about digital literacy, unawareness of Swedish healthcare services, psychological and social barriers, safety and privacy concerns, and the lack of an e-identification are all major barriers to accessing the eHealth system. From the data, it has also been observed that the main causes of the aforementioned hurdles are based on varied socioeconomic levels, literacy conditions of an individual, cultural background, and age. Another important observation shows that highly qualified people with limited language abilities have a difficult time using eHealth services. 

    Keywords 

    Ehealth, Covid-19, nudge approach, digital literacy, linguistic skills, Bank ID, 1177.se, Alltid öppet. 

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    fulltext
  • 17.
    Abougazar, Eman Silmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Barriers to equal access to eHealth in Stockholm: A qualitative study2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim behind this study was to observe and understand barriers to access the eHealth system equally. The study was conducted in Stockholm based on qualitative data in which semi- structured interviews were conducted among 15 interviewees from different localities of Stockholm. The findings from the collected data revealed that language barriers, lack of knowledge about digital literacy, unawareness of Swedish healthcare services, psychological and social barriers, safety and privacy concerns, and the lack of an e-identification are all major barriers to accessing the eHealth system. From the data, it has also been observed that the main causes of the aforementioned hurdles are based on varied socioeconomic levels, literacy conditions of an individual, cultural background, and age. Another important observation shows that highly qualified people with limited language abilities have a difficult time using eHealth services. 

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  • 18. Abram, Emese
    et al.
    Gajdatsy, Gabor
    Hermann, Peter
    Ujhelyi, Ferenc
    Borbely, Judit
    Shen, James Zhijian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    The colour of monolithic zirconia restorations determined by spectrophotometric examination2019In: Advances in Applied Ceramics: Structural, Functional and Bioceramics, ISSN 1743-6753, E-ISSN 1743-6761, Vol. 118, no 1-2, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this in vitro study is to examine the optical effects of monolithic zirconia of different translucency and thickness, combined with substrates of different colours. Materials and methods: Zirconia specimens of two colours (A2P1, WHITE) were used for the study, three try-in pastes (Variolink Esthetic); substrates were prepared from nine types of materials (six VITA SIMULATE, three metals). Measurements were carried out at the Faculty of Atomic Physics of the Technical University of Budapest with the state-of-the-art PerkinElmer (R) Lambda 1050 spectrophotometer. Results: The colouring of zirconia has a major effect on dE values resulting in different colour perceptibility and acceptability. Try-in pastes, however, have no significant effects overall. Conclusion: Applying coloured zirconia is highly eligible for preparing aesthetic crowns as their substrate-covering effect makes it possible to reproduce the desired colour. Uncoloured zirconia nonetheless is unaffected by the substrate material, especially above a certain layer thickness.

  • 19. Abram, Emese
    et al.
    Gajtdatsy, Gabor
    Feher, Dora
    Salata, Jozsef
    Beleznai, Szabolcs
    Hermann, Peter
    Borbely, Judit
    Shen, Zhijian James
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spectrophotometric examination of the optical effects of monolithic multilayered zirconia with different substrates2020In: Advances in Applied Ceramics: Structural, Functional and Bioceramics, ISSN 1743-6753, E-ISSN 1743-6761, Vol. 119, no 5-6, p. 261-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study is to examine specific optical effects of multilayered and coloured monolithic zirconia considering thickness and substrates of different colours using one of the most advanced spectrophotometers of the world. Multilayered zirconia specimens were used for the study with the thickness range of 0.5-2.5 mm and six types of substrate materials and three types of metal substrates. Measurements were carried out at Budapest Technical University with a PerkinElmer (R) Lambda1050UV/Vis/NIR spectrophotometer. The substrate colour and the thickness of zirconia affects the optical results, with special regard to colour perceptibility and acceptability. Monochromatic and multilayer zirconia show both similarities and discrepancies in behaviour, i.e. spectral reflectance and Delta E. Owing to the multi-coloured characteristics of multilayered zirconia the optical effect of the substrate less predictable than in the case of monochromatic zirconia thus requiring more detailed planning and implementation.

  • 20.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Carney, Rebecca M. D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS inner detector are described in this paper for different data-taking conditions in proton-proton, proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected during the first period of LHC operation (Run 1) and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with two different gas mixtures (xenon-based and argon-based) and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. These studies show that the tracking performance of the TRT is similar for the two gas mixtures and that a significant contribution to the particle momentum resolution is made by the TRT up to high particle densities.

  • 21.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    A measurement of material in the ATLAS tracker using secondary hadronic interactions in 7 TeV p p collisions2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the material in the ATLAS inner tracking detector is crucial in under-standing the reconstruction of charged-particle tracks, the performance of algorithms that identify jets containing b-hadrons and is also essential to reduce background in searches for exotic particles that can decay within the inner detector volume. Interactions of primary hadrons produced in pp collisions with the material in the inner detector are used to map the location and amount of this material. The hadronic interactions of primary particles may result in secondary vertices, which in this analysis are reconstructed by an inclusive vertex-finding algorithm. Data were collected using minimum-bias triggers by the ATLAS detector operating at the LHC during 2010 at centre-of-mass energy root s = 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19 nb(-1). Kinematic properties of these secondary vertices are used to study the validity of the modelling of hadronic interactions in simulation. Secondary-vertex yields are compared between data and simulation over a volume of about 0.7m(3) around the interaction point, and agreement is found within overall uncertainties.

  • 22. Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.
    et al.
    Barta, Katalin
    Beckham, Gregg T.
    Luterbacher, Jeremy S.
    Ralph, John
    Rinaldi, Roberto
    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sels, Bert F.
    Wang, Feng
    Guidelines for performing lignin-first biorefining2021In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 262-292Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The valorisation of the plant biopolymer lignin is now recognised as essential to enabling the economic viability of the lignocellulosic biorefining industry. In this context, the lignin-first biorefining approach, in which lignin valorisation is considered in the design phase, has demonstrated the fullest utilisation of lignocellulose. We define lignin-first methods as active stabilisation approaches that solubilise lignin from native lignocellulosic biomass while avoiding condensation reactions that lead to more recalcitrant lignin polymers. This active stabilisation can be accomplished by solvolysis and catalytic conversion of reactive intermediates to stable products or by protection-group chemistry of lignin oligomers or reactive monomers. Across the growing body of literature in this field, there are disparate approaches to report and analyse the results from lignin-first approaches, thus making quantitative comparisons between studies challenging. To that end, we present herein a set of guidelines for analysing critical data from lignin-first approaches, including feedstock analysis and process parameters, with the ambition of uniting the lignin-first research community around a common set of reportable metrics. These guidelines comprise standards and best practices or minimum requirements for feedstock analysis, stressing reporting of the fractionation efficiency, product yields, solvent mass balances, catalyst efficiency, and the requirements for additional reagents such as reducing, oxidising, or capping agents. Our goal is to establish best practices for the research community at large primarily to enable direct comparisons between studies from different laboratories. The use of these guidelines will be helpful for the newcomers to this field and pivotal for further progress in this exciting research area.

  • 23.
    A'Campo, Willeke
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Bartsch, Annett
    Roth, Achim
    Wendleder, Anna
    Martin, Victoria S.
    Durstewitz, Luca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Lodi, Rachele
    Wagner, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Arctic Tundra Land Cover Classification on the Beaufort Coast Using the Kennaugh Element Framework on Dual-Polarimetric TerraSAR-X Imagery2021In: Remote Sensing, E-ISSN 2072-4292, Vol. 13, no 23, article id 4780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arctic tundra landscapes are highly complex and are rapidly changing due to the warming climate. Datasets that document the spatial and temporal variability of the landscape are needed to monitor the rapid changes. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery is specifically suitable for monitoring the Arctic, as SAR, unlike optical remote sensing, can provide time series regardless of weather and illumination conditions. This study examines the potential of seasonal backscatter mechanisms in Arctic tundra environments for improving land cover classification purposes by using a time series of HH/HV TerraSAR-X (TSX) imagery. A Random Forest (RF) classification was applied on multi-temporal Sigma Nought intensity and multi-temporal Kennaugh matrix element data. The backscatter analysis revealed clear differences in the polarimetric response of water, soil, and vegetation, while backscatter signal variations within different vegetation classes were more nuanced. The RF models showed that land cover classes could be distinguished with 92.4% accuracy for the Kennaugh element data, compared to 57.7% accuracy for the Sigma Nought intensity data. Texture predictors, while improving the classification accuracy on the one hand, degraded the spatial resolution of the land cover product. The Kennaugh elements derived from TSX winter acquisitions were most important for the RF model, followed by the Kennaugh elements derived from summer and autumn acquisitions. The results of this study demonstrate that multi-temporal Kennaugh elements derived from dual-polarized X-band imagery are a powerful tool for Arctic tundra land cover mapping.

  • 24. Adak, Vivekananda
    et al.
    Roychowdhury, Krishanu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Cornell University, USA.
    Das, Sourin
    Spin Berry phase in a helical edge state: S-z nonconservation and transport signatures2020In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 102, no 3, article id 035423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topological protection of edge state in quantum spin Hall systems relies only on time-reversal symmetry. Hence, S-z conservation on the edge can be relaxed which can have an interferometric manifestation in terms of spin Berry phase. Primarily it could lead to the generation of spin Berry phase arising from a closed loop dynamics of electrons. Our work provides a minimal framework to generate and detect these effects by employing both spin-unpolarized and spin-polarized leads. We show that spin-polarized leads could lead to resonances or antiresonances in the two-terminal conductance of the interferometer. We further show that the positions of these antiresonances (as a function of energy of the incident electron) get shifted owing to the presence of spin Berry phase. Finally, we present simulations of a device setup using KWANT package which put our theoretical predictions on a firm footing.

  • 25.
    Adiels, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Where did technology go?2011In: Positioning Technology Education in the curriculum / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2011, 1, p. 53-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26. Adler, Anneli
    et al.
    Kumaniaev, Ivan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karacic, Almir
    Baddigam, Kiran Reddy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hanes, Rebecca J.
    Subbotina, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bartling, Andrew W.
    Huertas-Alonso, Alberto José
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain.
    Moreno, Andres
    Håkansson, Helena
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Beckham, Gregg T.
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Lignin-first biorefining of Nordic poplar to produce cellulose fibers could displace cotton production on agricultural lands2022In: Joule, E-ISSN 2542-4351, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 1845-1858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we show that lignin-first biorefining of poplar can enable the production of dissolving cellulose pulp that can produce regenerated cellulose, which could substitute cotton. These results in turn indicate that agricultural land dedicated to cotton could be reclaimed for food production by extending poplar plantations to produce textile fibers. Based on climate-adapted poplar clones capable of growth on marginal lands in the Nordic region, we estimate an environmentally sustainable annual biomass production of ∼11 tonnes/ha. At scale, lignin-first biorefining of this poplar could annually generate 2.4 tonnes/ha of dissolving pulp for textiles and 1.1 m3 biofuels. Life cycle assessment indicates that, relative to cotton production, this approach could substantially reduce water consumption and identifies certain areas for further improvement. Overall, this work highlights a new value chain to reduce the environmental footprint of textiles, chemicals, and biofuels while enabling land reclamation and water savings from cotton back to food production.

  • 27. Adnan, Mohammed Mostafa
    et al.
    Nylund, Inger-Emma
    Jaworski, Aleksander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hvidsten, Sverre
    Glomm Ese, Marit-Helen
    Glaum, Julia
    Einarsrud, Mari-Ann
    The Structure, Morphology, and Complex Permittivity of Epoxy Nanodielectrics with In Situ Synthesized Surface-Functionalized SiO22021In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 1469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epoxy nanocomposites have demonstrated promising properties for high-voltage insulation applications. An in situ approach to the synthesis of epoxy-SiO2 nanocomposites was employed, where surface-functionalized SiO2 (up to 5 wt.%) is synthesized directly in the epoxy. The dispersion of SiO2 was found to be affected by both the pH and the coupling agent used in the synthesis. Hierarchical clusters of SiO2 (10–60 nm) formed with free-space lengths of 53–105 nm (increasing with pH or SiO2 content), exhibiting both mass and surface-fractal structures. Reducing the amount of coupling agent resulted in an increase in the cluster size (~110 nm) and the free-space length (205 nm). At room temperature, nanocomposites prepared at pH 7 exhibited up to a 4% increase in the real relative permittivity with increasing SiO2 content, whereas those prepared at pH 11 showed up to a 5% decrease with increasing SiO2 content. Above the glass transition, all the materials exhibited low-frequency dispersion effect resulting in electrode polarization, which was amplified in the nanocomposites. Improvements in the dielectric properties were found to be not only dependent on the state of dispersion, but also the structure and morphology of the inorganic nanoparticles. 

  • 28. Adolphsen, Jens Q.
    et al.
    Gil, Vanesa
    Sudireddy, Bhaskar R.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Characterisation and processing of aqueous LaNi0.6Fe0.4O3 Suspensions into Porous Electrode Layers for Alkaline Water Electrolysis2019In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, E-ISSN 1873-619X, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 1271-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The colloidal properties and processing of aqueous LaNi0.6.Fe0.4O3 suspensions into electrode layers with hierarchical pore sizes has been investigated by light scattering, electron microscopy and rheology. We found that the colloidal stability of the oxide particles and the resulting microstructure of the electrode layers were similar when dispersing the particles at their intrinsic pH, or when adding polyvinylpyrrolidone. The addition of the ammonium salt of poly(methaacrylic acid) resulted in a poor colloidal stability and the concentrated suspensions became viscoelastic during processing. Addition of rice starch resulted in an increase of the porosity but the cast electrode layers cracked and delaminated.

  • 29. Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Wang, Baoyuan
    Xia, Chen
    Zhang, Wei
    He, Yunjuan
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    Zhu, Bin
    Fabrication of novel electrolyte-layer free fuel cell with semi-ionic conductor (Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta- Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9) and Schottky barrier2016In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 328, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BSCF) is synthesized via a chemical co-precipitation technique for a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) (300-600 degrees C) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC) in a comprehensive study. The EFFC with a homogeneous mixture of samarium doped ceria (SDC): BSCF (60%:40% by weight) which is rather similar to the cathode (SDC: BSCF in 50%:50% by weight) used for a three layer SOFC demonstrates peak power densities up to 655 mW/cm(2), while a three layer (anode/ electrolyte/cathode) SOFC has reached only 425 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C. Chemical phase, crystal structure and morphology of the as-prepared sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of 3-layer SOFC and EFFC are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As-prepared BSCF has exhibited a maximum conductivity above 300 S/cm at 550 degrees C. High performance of the EFFC device corresponds to a balanced combination between ionic and electronic (holes) conduction characteristic. The Schottky barrier prevents the EFFC from the electronic short circuiting problem which also enhances power output. The results provide a new way to produce highly effective cathode materials for LTSOFC and semiconductor designs for EFFC functions using a semiconducting-ionic material.

  • 30. Agarwal, Sahil
    et al.
    Wettlaufer, John S.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Yale University, USA; University of Oxford, UK.
    Fluctuations in Arctic sea-ice extent: comparing observations and climate models2018In: Philosophical Transactions. Series A: Mathematical, physical, and engineering science, ISSN 1364-503X, E-ISSN 1471-2962, Vol. 376, no 2129, article id 20170332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fluctuation statistics of the observed sea-ice extent during the satellite era are compared with model output from CMIP5 models using a multifractal time series method. The two robust features of the observations are that on annual to biannual time scales the ice extent exhibits white noise structure, and there is a decadal scale trend associated with the decay of the ice cover. It is shown that (i) there is a large inter-model variability in the time scales extracted from the models, (ii) none of the models exhibits the decadal time scales found in the satellite observations, (iii) five of the 21 models examined exhibit the observed white noise structure, and (iv) the multi-model ensemble mean exhibits neither the observed white noise structure nor the observed decadal trend. It is proposed that the observed fluctuation statistics produced by this method serve as an appropriate test bed for modelling studies. This article is part of the theme issue 'Modelling of sea-ice phenomena'.

  • 31.
    Agriesti, Serio
    et al.
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland; Tallinn University of Technology Tallinn, Estonia.
    Kuzmanovski, Vladimir
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland; Tallinn University of Technology Tallinn, Estonia.
    Hollmén, Jaakko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Aalto University Espoo, Finland.
    Roncoli, Claudio
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Nahmias-Biran, Bat-Hen
    Tel Aviv University Tel Aviv, Israel.
    A Bayesian Optimization Approach for Calibrating Large-Scale Activity-Based Transport Models2023In: ieee open journal of intelligent transportation systems, ISSN 2687-7813, Vol. 4, p. 740-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing complexity in transportation in cases such as disruptive trends or disaggregated management strategies has become increasingly important. This in turn is resulting in the rising adoption of Agent-Based and Activity-Based modeling. Still, a broad adoption is hindered by the high complexity and computational needs. For example, hundreds of parameters are involved in the calibration of Activity-Based models focused on behavioral theory, to properly frame the required detailed socio-economical characteristics. To address this challenge, this paper presents a novel Bayesian Optimization approach that incorporates a surrogate model defined as an improved Random Forest to automate the calibration process of the behavioral parameters. The presented solution calibrates the largest set of parameters yet, according to the literature, by combining state-of-the-art methods. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first work in which such a high dimensionality is tackled in sequential model-based algorithm configuration theory. The proposed method is tested in the city of Tallinn, Estonia, for which the calibration of 477 behavioral parameters is carried out. The calibration process results in a satisfactory performance for all the major indicators, the OD matrix average mismatch is equal to 15.92 vehicles per day while the error for the overall number of trips is equal to 4%.

  • 32.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Following the Assembly of Iron Oxide Nanocubes by Video Microscopy and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied the growth of ordered arrays by evaporation-induced self-assembly of iron oxide nanocubes with edge lengths of 6.8 and 10.1 nm using video microscopy (VM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Ex situ electron diffraction of the ordered arrays demonstrates that the crystal axes of the nanocubes are coaligned and confirms that the ordered arrays are mesocrystals. Time-resolved video microscopy shows that growth of the highly ordered arrays at slow solvent evaporation is controlled by particle diffusion and can be described by a simple growth model. The growth of each mesocrystal depends only on the number of nanoparticles within the accessible region irrespective of the relative time of formation. The mass of the dried mesocrystals estimated from the analysis of the bandwidth-shift-to-frequency-shift ratio correlates well with the total mass of the oleate-coated nanoparticles in the deposited dispersion drop.

  • 33.
    Aguilar Sánchez, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nanopolysaccharide coatings for functional surfaces in water-treatment materials: From mechanisms to process scalability2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, materials from renewable resources were used to develop functionalized surfaces for water treatment. The work is thus inspired by, and contributes to, the United Nations sustainable goals of: (i) clean water and sanitation, (ii) climate action, (iii) responsible consumption and production, (iv) life below water, and (v) partnerships for the goals.

    Nanopolysaccharides, most specifically nanocellulose and nanochitin, are great candidates for functional and renewable materials for multiple applications, including the treatment of water and wastewater. This thesis focused on the formulation of different types of nanopolysaccharide-based coatings to enhance the performance of commercially available membranes and cellulose fabrics. We developed a simple waterborne layer-by-layer cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (T-CNF) coating for commercially available membranes. By changing the surface and pore structure of the membrane, the coating tuned which substrates could pass through the membrane, improved antifouling performanced, and when derived from T-CNF, it was harmful to bacterial colonization. Considering the observed T-CNF’s effect on bacteria, we developed a chemically crosslinked T-CNF/Poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) coating with outstanding antibiofouling performance, ion adsorption/rejection combined with size exclusion, and with dimensional and pH stability. Furthermore, we used a surface-impregnation approach based on bio-based nanotechnology which resulted in highly efficient, with improved mechanical properties, and fully bio-based high-flux water filtration membranes using commercially available nonwoven fabrics. Membranes with coatings prepared from CNC, chitin nanocrystals (ChNC) and T-CNF separated particles in the size range of bacteria and viruses, and those prepared from also T-CNF showed high microplastic filtration efficiency. Moreover, membrane coating based on ChNC and T-CNF had outstanding antibacterial properties.

    Overall, we demonstrated that nanopolysaccharide coatings on membranes could provide a significant reduction in organic fouling and biofilm formation while enabling the adsorption of ions and separation of microplastics. In the case of biofilm formation, the functional group and surface charge of the different nanopolysaccharides determined the effect over bacteria, indicating that surfaces could be tailored against microbes. In addition, we directly compared the effect of the different nanopolysaccharides of interest (CNC, T-CNF, ligno-celullose nanocrystals (L-CNC), and ChNC) on bacterial viability and biofilm formation, and found a great difference between the different types of nanocellulose and a different mechanism for nanochitin. Thorough, none of the nanopolysaccharides displayed cytotoxic effects while in indirect contact with the bacterial cells. Nevertheless, T-CNF, ChNC and L-CNC showed a cytostatic effect on bacterial proliferation. Furthermore, the nanomechanical properties of the bacterial cells and interacting forces between the nanopolysaccharides and Escherichia coli (E. coli) were affected when in direct contact with the nanopolysaccharide surfaces.

    Lastly, we upscaled one of our coating processes, demonstrating that the method could be easily implemented at an industrial level. The impact of this thesis relies on the effectiveness of the coatings, the different types of functionalities observed, the demonstrated fast implementation at an industrial scale, and the potential to extrapolate this technology to other applications.

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  • 34.
    Aguilar Sánchez, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Jalvo, Blanca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nano-cellulose coatings for antifouling polyethersulfone (PES) membranes2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Aguilar-Sanchez, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Li, Jing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mautner, Andreas
    Jalvo, Blanca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Revealing the interaction between nanopolysaccharides and E.Coli by biological studies and atomic force microscopyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Aguilar-Sánchez, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Jalvo, Blanca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nano-cellulose coatings for antifouling and mechanically enhanced polyethersulfone (PES) membranes2019In: Nordic Polymer Days 2019: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Rita de Sousa Dias, Sulalit Bandyopadhyay, 2019, p. 92-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane technology is commonly used for filtration processes of industrial wastewater. Using membranes for water filtration is a safe and energy efficient solution. One of the main problems that arises during the usage of membranes is the fouling effects. Fouling increases the membrane separation resistance, reduces productivity due to a flux decline and affect membrane selectivity. These effects can be avoid by modifying the surface of the membranes using bio-based materials such as nano-cellulose. Nano-cellulose is a great example of a material obtained from renewable resources, which provides high reinforcement and antifouling properties to membranes.

    The aim of this work was the development of coatings with cellulose nano-crystals (CNC) and Tempooxidized cellulose nano-fribrils (T-CNF) using polyvinyl-alcohol (PVOH), as binding phase to enhance mechanical and antifouling properties over pure commercial PES membranes. The coatings were chemically crosslinked to increase mechanical properties and to improve stability of the coating and avoid swelling. It is expected that by avoiding swelling, permeability remains stable through time. All coating formulations remained stable after 10 hours of crossflow filtration. Mechanical properties of the coated membranes were improved in both dry and wet conditions, showing higher values of tensile strenght and E modulus compared to the uncoated ones. In addition, coated membranes showed high hydrophilicity and low adherence of bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    The coatings developed showed stability over PES membranes and provide them with a nanostructured surface which showed an extended durability in use. The modified surface membranes presented good mechanical properties in dry and wet conditions, high flux, high hydrophilicity, resistance to BSA fouling and to different pH environments. Moreover, these modified membranes showed promising results for fast upscaling at industrial level due to the simplicity of the coating process and the availability of the materials in the market.

  • 37. Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Fors, Carina
    Anund, Anna
    Hallvig, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Video-based observer rated sleepiness versus self-reported subjective sleepiness in real road driving2015In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Observer-rated sleepiness (ORS) based on video recordings of the driver's face is often used when analysing naturalistic driving data. The aim of this study is to investigate if ORS ratings agree with subjective self-reported sleepiness (SRS). Methods: Forty raters assessed 54 video-clips showing drivers with varying levels of sleepiness. The video-clips were recorded during a field experiment focusing on driver sleepiness using the same cameras that are typically used in large-scale field studies. The weak results prompted a second test. Ten human factors researchers made pairwise comparisons of videos showing the same four participants in an alert versus a very sleepy condition. The task was simply to select the video-clip where the driver was sleepy. Results: The overall average percentage of video segments where ORS and SRS matched was 41 % in Test 1. ORS 0 (alert) and ORS 2 (very sleepy) were easier to score than ORS 1 and it was slightly harder to rate night-time drives. Inter-rater agreement was low, with average Pearson's r correlations of 0.19 and Krippendorff's alpha of 0.15. In Test 2, the average Pearson's r correlations was 0.35 and Krippendorff's alpha was 0.62. The correspondence between ORS and SRS showed an agreement of 35 %. Conclusions: The results indicate that ORS ratings based on real road video recordings correspond poorly with SRS and have low inter-rater agreement. Further research is necessary in order to further evaluate the usefulness of ORS as a measure of sleepiness.

  • 38. Ahmed, Imaduddin
    et al.
    Parikh, Priti
    Munezero, Parfait
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Ericsson, Sweden.
    Sianjase, Graham
    Coffman, D'Maris
    The impact of power outages on households in Zambia2023In: Economia Politica, ISSN 1120-2890, E-ISSN 1973-820X, no 40, p. 835-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As global average temperatures rise, so does the frequency and intensity of El Niño-induced droughts, which in turn threaten the reliability of hydropower. 1.4 billion people live in countries where hydropower constitutes more than a quarter of the electricity production and which have experienced El Niño droughts, meaning many more power outages can be expected around the world. Little research has been conducted on the impact of power outages on mental health. This study takes Zambia as its case study to examine the impact that El Niño droughts have had on the lives of householders connected to a highly hydropower-dependant electricity grid, and includes the impact it has had on their physical and self-reported mental health. Using 54 online responses to a survey, we found that the greatest impacts of outages spoiled food, compromised entertainment, compromised ability to work and limitation in cooking options. More than a fifth of respondents reported experiencing self-reported depression to a major degree or all of the time due to power outages, with individuals writing their own responses that they felt debilitated, experienced reduced communication and reduced activities, and stress. Using Bayesian inference, we found that changes in sleeping patterns arising from power outages was a statistically significant predictor of self-reported depression. 63% of surveyed households were willing to pay approximately USD 0.10/kWh as of the end of 2019, about double the tariff that they did, to ensure reliable electricity supply. Household income was a statistically significant predictor of willingness to pay more.

  • 39. Ahmed, Shafique
    et al.
    Zhang, Man
    Koval, Vladimir
    Zou, Lifong
    Shen, Zhijian James
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Chen, Riqing
    Yang, Bin
    Yan, Haixue
    Terahertz probing of low-temperature degradation in zirconia bioceramics2022In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 1106-1115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZrO2-based ceramics are widely used in biomedical applications due to its color, biocompatibility, and excellent mechanical properties. However, low-temperature degradation (LTD) introduces a potential risk for long-term reliability of these materials. The development of innovative nondestructive techniques, which can explore LTD in zirconia-derived compounds, is strongly required. Yttria stabilized zirconia, 3Y-TZP, is one of the well-developed ZrO2-based ceramics with improved resistance to LTD for dental crown and implant applications. Here, 3Y-TZP ceramic powders were pressed and sintered to study the LTD phenomenon by phase transition behavior. The LTD-driven tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transition was confirmed by XRD. XPS analysis demonstrated that induced LTD reduced the oxygen vacancies which supports these findings. It is proved that after the degradation, the 3Y-TZP ceramics show the decreased dielectric permittivity at terahertz frequencies due to the crystallographic phase transformation. Terahertz nondestructive probe is a promising method to investigate LTD in zirconia ceramics.

  • 40.
    Ahmed, Trifa Mohammad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Emissions of particulate associated oxygenated and native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from vehicles powered by ethanol/gasoline fuel blends2018In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 214, p. 381-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emission factors for oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) and PAHs have been determined from two different fuel flexible light duty vehicles operated at -7 degrees C in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and at +22 degrees C in the Artemis Driving Cycle (ADC). Three different gasoline/ethanol blends, commercially available in Sweden, were tested i.e., gasoline E5, with 5% v/v ethanol and ethanol fuel E85 with 85% v/v ethanol and winter time quality E70 with 70% v/v ethanol, respectively. The results showed greatly increased emissions of both OPAHs and PAHs at cold engine start conditions (-7 degrees C in the NEDC) compared to warm engine start (+ 22 degrees C in the ADC). For the OPAHs, higher average total emission factors were obtained when running on E85 compared to E5 at both cold 2.72 mu g/km vs 1.11 mu g/km and warm 0.19 mu g/km vs 0.11 mu g/km starting conditions with the highest emissions when using E70 at -7 degrees C 4.12 mu g/km. The same trend was found for the PAHs at cold engine start with higher average total emission factors when using ethanol fuel 71.5 mu g/km and 60.0 mu g/km for E70 and E85, respectively compared to gasoline E5 (20.2 mu g/km). Slightly higher average total PAH emissions were obtained when operating at + 22 degrees C with E5 compared to with E85 1.23 mu g/km vs 0.72 mu g/km.

  • 41.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Deoskar, Kunal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    O'Sullivan, Erin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Computational techniques for the analysis of small signals in high-statistics neutrino oscillation experiments2020In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 977, article id 164332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current and upcoming generation of Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes - collecting unprecedented quantities of neutrino events - can be used to explore subtle effects in oscillation physics, such as (but not restricted to) the neutrino mass ordering. The sensitivity of an experiment to these effects can be estimated from Monte Carlo simulations. With the high number of events that will be collected, there is a trade-off between the computational expense of running such simulations and the inherent statistical uncertainty in the determined values. In such a scenario, it becomes impractical to produce and use adequately-sized sets of simulated events with traditional methods, such as Monte Carlo weighting. In this work we present a staged approach to the generation of expected distributions of observables in order to overcome these challenges. By combining multiple integration and smoothing techniques which address limited statistics from simulation it arrives at reliable analysis results using modest computational resources.

  • 42.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dumm, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wolf, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, U.S.A..
    Very high-energy gamma-ray follow-up program using neutrino triggers from IceCube2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe and report the status of a neutrino-triggered program in IceCube that generates real-time alerts for gamma-ray follow-up observations by atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS). While IceCube is capable of monitoring the whole sky continuously, high-energy gamma-ray telescopes have restricted fields of view and in general are unlikely to be observing a potential neutrino-flaring source at the time such neutrinos are recorded. The use of neutrino-triggered alerts thus aims at increasing the availability of simultaneous multi-messenger data during potential neutrino flaring activity, which can increase the discovery potential and constrain the phenomenological interpretation of the high-energy emission of selected source classes (e. g. blazars). The requirements of a fast and stable online analysis of potential neutrino signals and its operation are presented, along with first results of the program operating between 14 March 2012 and 31 December 2015.

  • 43. Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.
    et al.
    Higueras, Manuel
    Puig, Pedro
    Einbeck, Jochen
    Samaga, Daniel
    Francesc Barquinero, Joan
    Barrios, Lleonard
    Brzozowska, Beata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Fattibene, Paola
    Gregoire, Eric
    Jaworska, Alicja
    Lloyd, David
    Oestreicher, Ursula
    Romm, Horst
    Rothkamm, Kai
    Roy, Laurence
    Sommer, Sylwester
    Terzoudi, Georgia
    Thierens, Hubert
    Trompier, Francois
    Vral, Anne
    Woda, Clemens
    Uncertainty of fast biological radiation dose assessment for emergency response scenarios2017In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Reliable dose estimation is an important factor in appropriate dosimetric triage categorization of exposed individuals to support radiation emergency response. Materials and methods: Following work done under the EU FP7 MULTIBIODOSE and RENEB projects, formal methods for defining uncertainties on biological dose estimates are compared using simulated and real data from recent exercises. Results: The results demonstrate that a Bayesian method of uncertainty assessment is the most appropriate, even in the absence of detailed prior information. The relative accuracy and relevance of techniques for calculating uncertainty and combining assay results to produce single dose and uncertainty estimates is further discussed. Conclusions: Finally, it is demonstrated that whatever uncertainty estimation method is employed, ignoring the uncertainty on fast dose assessments can have an important impact on rapid biodosimetric categorization.

  • 44. Ainsbury, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Badie, Christophe
    Barnard, Stephen
    Manning, Grainne
    Moquet, Jayne
    Abend, Michael
    Antunes, Ana Catarina
    Barrios, Lleonard
    Bassinet, Celine
    Beinke, Christina
    Bortolin, Emanuela
    Bossin, Lily
    Bricknell, Clare
    Brzoska, Kamil
    Buraczewska, Iwona
    Huertas Castano, Carlos
    Cemusova, Zina
    Christiansson, Maria
    Mateos Cordero, Santiago
    Coster, Guillaume
    Della Monac, Sara
    Desangles, Francois
    Discher, Michael
    Dominguez, Inmaculada
    Doucha-Senf, Sven
    Eakins, Jon
    Fattibene, Paola
    Filippi, Silvia
    Frenzel, Monika
    Georgieva, Dimka
    Gregoire, Eric
    Guogyte, Kamile
    Hadjidekova, Valeria
    Hadjiiska, Ljubomira
    Hristova, Rositsa
    Karakosta, Maria
    Kis, Eniko
    Kriehuber, Ralf
    Lee, Jungil
    Lloyd, David
    Lumniczky, Katalin
    Lyng, Fiona
    Macaeva, Ellina
    Majewski, Matthaeus
    Vanda Martins, S.
    McKeever, Stephen W. S.
    Meade, Aidan
    Medipally, Dinesh
    Meschini, Roberta
    M'kacher, Radhia
    Gil, Octavia Monteiro
    Montero, Alegria
    Moreno, Mercedes
    Noditi, Mihaela
    Oestreicher, Ursula
    Oskamp, Dominik
    Palitti, Fabrizio
    Palma, Valentina
    Pantelias, Gabriel
    Pateux, Jerome
    Patrono, Clarice
    Pepe, Gaetano
    Port, Matthias
    Jesus Prieto, Maria
    Quattrini, Maria Cristina
    Quintens, Roel
    Ricoul, Michelle
    Roy, Laurence
    Sabatier, Laure
    Sebastia, Natividad
    Sholom, Sergey
    Sommer, Sylwester
    Staynova, Albena
    Strunz, Sonja
    Terzoudi, Georgia
    Testa, Antonella
    Trompier, Francois
    Valente, Marco
    Van Hoey, Olivier
    Veronese, Ivan
    Wojcik, Andrzej
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Woda, Clemens
    Integration of new biological and physical retrospective dosimetry methods into EU emergency response plans - joint RENEB and EURADOS inter-laboratory comparisons2017In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: RENEB, 'Realising the European Network of Biodosimetry and Physical Retrospective Dosimetry,' is a network for research and emergency response mutual assistance in biodosimetry within the EU. Within this extremely active network, a number of new dosimetry methods have recently been proposed or developed. There is a requirement to test and/or validate these candidate techniques and inter-comparison exercises are a well-established method for such validation. Materials and methods: The authors present details of inter-comparisons of four such new methods: dicentric chromosome analysis including telomere and centromere staining; the gene expression assay carried out in whole blood; Raman spectroscopy on blood lymphocytes, and detection of radiation induced thermoluminescent signals in glass screens taken from mobile phones. Results: In general the results show good agreement between the laboratories and methods within the expected levels of uncertainty, and thus demonstrate that there is a lot of potential for each of the candidate techniques. Conclusions: Further work is required before the new methods can be included within the suite of reliable dosimetry methods for use by RENEB partners and others in routine and emergency response scenarios.

  • 45. Akanyeti, Otar
    et al.
    Di Santo, Valentina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Functional Morphology.
    Goerig, Elsa
    Wainwright, Dylan K.
    Liao, James C.
    Castro-Santos, Theodore
    Lauder, George
    Fish-inspired segment models for undulatory steady swimming2022In: Bioinspiration & Biomimetics, ISSN 1748-3182, E-ISSN 1748-3190, Vol. 17, no 4, article id 046007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many aquatic animals swim by undulatory body movements and understanding the diversity of these movements could unlock the potential for designing better underwater robots. Here, we analyzed the steady swimming kinematics of a diverse group of fish species to investigate whether their undulatory movements can be represented using a series of interconnected multi-segment models, and if so, to identify the key factors driving the segment configuration of the models. Our results show that the steady swimming kinematics of fishes can be described successfully using parsimonious models, 83% of which had fewer than five segments. In these models, the anterior segments were significantly longer than the posterior segments, and there was a direct link between segment configuration and swimming kinematics, body shape, and Reynolds number. The models representing eel-like fishes with elongated bodies and fishes swimming at high Reynolds numbers had more segments and less segment length variability along the body than the models representing other fishes. These fishes recruited their anterior bodies to a greater extent, initiating the undulatory wave more anteriorly. Two shape parameters, related to axial and overall body thickness, predicted segment configuration with moderate to high success rate. We found that head morphology was a good predictor of its segment length. While there was a large variation in head segments, the length of tail segments was similar across all models. Given that fishes exhibited variable caudal fin shapes, the consistency of tail segments could be a result of an evolutionary constraint tuned for high propulsive efficiency. The bio-inspired multi-segment models presented in this study highlight the key bending points along the body and can be used to decide on the placement of actuators in fish-inspired robots, to model hydrodynamic forces in theoretical and computational studies, or for predicting muscle activation patterns during swimming.

  • 46.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ogunwumi, Steven
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Thin zeolite laminates for rapid and energy-efficient carbon capture2017In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 10988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin, binder-less zeolite NaX laminates, with thicknesses ranging between 310 to 750 mu m and widths exceeding 50 mm and biaxial tensile strength in excess of 3 MPa, were produced by pulsed current processing. The NaX laminates displayed a high CO2 adsorption capacity and high binary CO2-over-N-2 and CO2-over-CH4 selectivity, suitable for CO2 capture from flue gas and upgrading of raw biogas. The thin laminates displayed a rapid CO2 uptake; NaX laminates with a thickness of 310 mu m were saturated to 40% of their CO2 capacity within 24 seconds. The structured laminates of 310 mu m thickness and 50 mm thickness would offer low pressure drop and efficient carbon capture performance in a laminate-based swing adsorption technology.

  • 47.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sjöberg, Erik
    Korelskiy, Danil
    Rayson, Mark
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Preparation of graded silicalite-1 substrates for all-zeolite membranes with excellent CO2/H-2 separation performance2015In: Journal of Membrane Science, ISSN 0376-7388, E-ISSN 1873-3123, Vol. 493, p. 206-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graded silicalite-1 substrates with a high gas permeability and low surface roughness have been produced by pulsed current processing of a thin coating of a submicron silicalite-1 powder onto a powder body of coarser silicalite-1 crystals. Thin zeolite films have been hydrothermally grown onto the graded silicalite-1 support and the all-zeolite membranes display an excellent CO2/H-2 separation factor of 12 at 0 degrees C and a CO2 permeance of 21.3 x 10(-7) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa-1 for an equimolar CO2/H-2 feed at 505 kPa and 101 kPa helium sweep gas. Thermal cracking estimates based on calculated surface energies and measured thermal expansion coefficients suggest that all-zeolite membranes with a minimal thermal expansion mismatch between the graded substrate and the zeolite film should remain crack-free during thermal cycling and the critical calcination step.

  • 48. Akmete, A.
    et al.
    Alexandrov, A.
    Anokhina, A.
    Aoki, S.
    Atkin, E.
    Azorskiy, N.
    Back, J. J.
    Bagulya, A.
    Baranov, A.
    Barker, G. J.
    Bay, A.
    Bayliss, V.
    Bencivenni, G.
    Berdnikov, A. Y.
    Berdnikov, Y. A.
    Bertani, M.
    Betancourt, C.
    Bezshyiko, I.
    Bezshyyko, O.
    Bick, D.
    Bieschke, S.
    Blanco, A.
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    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
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    Zaytsev, Yu.
    The active muon shield in the SHiP experiment2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SHiP experiment is designed to search for very weakly interacting particles beyond the Standard Model which are produced in a 400 GeV/c proton beam dump at the CERN SPS. An essential task for the experiment is to keep the Standard Model background level to less than 0.1 event after 2 x 10(20) protons on target. In the beam dump, around 10(11) muons will be produced per second. The muon rate in the spectrometer has to be reduced by at least four orders of magnitude to avoid muon-induced combinatorial background. A novel active muon shield is used to magnetically deflect the muons out of the acceptance of the spectrometer. This paper describes the basic principle of such a shield, its optimization and its performance.

  • 49. Akperov, Mirseid
    et al.
    Eliseev, Alexey V.
    Rinke, Annette
    Mokhov, Igor I.
    Semenov, Vladimir A.
    Dembitskaya, Mariya
    Matthes, Heidrun
    Adakudlu, Muralidhar
    Boberg, Fredrik
    Christensen, Jens H.
    Dethloff, Klaus
    Fettweis, Xavier
    Gutjahr, Oliver
    Heinemann, Günther
    Koenigk, Torben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology . Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bolin Centre for Climate Research (together with KTH & SMHI).
    Sein, Dmitry
    Laprise, René
    Mottram, Ruth
    Nikiéma, Oumarou
    Sobolowski, Stefan
    Winger, Katja
    Zhang, Wenxin
    Future projections of wind energy potentials in the arctic for the 21st century under the RCP8.5 scenario from regional climate models (Arctic-CORDEX)2023In: Anthropocene, E-ISSN 2213-3054, Vol. 44, article id 100402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic has warmed more than twice the rate of the entire globe. To quantify possible climate change effects, we calculate wind energy potentials from a multi-model ensemble of Arctic-CORDEX. For this, we analyze future changes of wind power density (WPD) using an eleven-member multi-model ensemble. Impacts are estimated for two periods (2020-2049 and 2070-2099) of the 21st century under a high emission scenario (RCP8.5). The multi-model mean reveals an increase of seasonal WPD over the Arctic in the future decades. WPD variability across a range of temporal scales is projected to increase over the Arctic. The signal amplifies by the end of 21st century. Future changes in the frequency of wind speeds at 100 m not useable for wind energy production (wind speeds below 4 m/s or above 25 m/s) has been analyzed. The RCM ensemble simulates a more frequent occurrence of 100 m non-usable wind speeds for the wind-turbines over Scandinavia and selected land areas in Alaska, northern Russia and Canada. In contrast, non-usable wind speeds decrease over large parts of Eastern Siberia and in northern Alaska. Thus, our results indicate increased potential of the Arctic for the development and production of wind energy. Bias corrected and not corrected near-surface wind speed and WPD changes have been compared with each other. It has been found that both show the same sign of future change, but differ in magnitude of these changes. The role of sea-ice retreat and vegetation expansion in the Arctic in future on near-surface wind speed variability has been also assessed. Surface roughness through sea-ice and vegetation changes may significantly impact on WPD variability in the Arctic.

  • 50.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

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