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  • 1.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

  • 2. Abbas, Sk Jahir
    et al.
    Ramacharyulu, P. V. R. K.
    Lo, Hsin-Hsi
    Ali, Sk Imran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ke, Shyue-Chu
    A catalytic approach to synthesis of PLP analogs and other environmental protocols in a single handed CaO/TiO2 green nanoparticle2017In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 210, p. 276-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As our precursory stage we have focus straight forward on clean catalytic approach for the production of C3 substituted pyridoxal-5 '-phosphate analogues of vitamin B6, and other environmental protocols like photocatalytic activity, green fossil fuels and c-c coupling using efficient biocompatible eggshell related unrivalled materials which show versatility of the catalytic effect on different inorganic support. The eggshell immobilized nanoparticles have encouraging relevance in creation of new molecules and can advantageously be studied by various spectroscopic, thermal and elemental analyses like powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The elucidate nature of nanoparticles offer: more active site acts as lewis acid, vacancies on the catalyst surface and good to better yield of C3 substituted deoxy and 2-nor deoxy coenzyme pyridoxine (PN), coupling products propargylamines (PA), photo degrading enhancement of MB and nucleophilic substituted fatty acid (BD). This enzyme cofactor explore molecular synthons to synthetic equivalent: 3-deoxy and 2-nor-3-deoxy pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxal oxime (P0), pyridoxamine (PM) and mono phosphate derivative of 3-deoxyPM, 3-deoxyPL respectively and chemistry of selective oxidation and schiff base mechanism was studied and complemented through combined experimental and theoretical molecular orbital calculation consequently. The heterogeneous catalyst has strong selective ability towards selective reducing pyridine diester, bioactive intermediates substances and holds vast potential towards separation for the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable green fossil fuels. The catalyst including environmental concern is reapplicable and strong impressive that can unfold the space of worthy metal component widely and facilitate the scope to take a vital role in different fileds like catalysis, biochemistry, nanoscience, energy and materials science.

  • 3. Abdullah, Omed Gh.
    et al.
    Tahir, Dana A.
    Kadir, K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Kurdistan Institution for Strategic Studies and Scientific Research, Iraq.
    Optical and structural investigation of synthesized PVA/PbS nanocomposites2015In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 6939-6944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer nanocomposite based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and lead sulfide (PbS) in the average radius of (1.88-2.23) nm, have been synthesized using the chemical reduction rote and solution casting technique for different concentrations of PbS. The characterization of the polymer nanocomposite films were carried out using UV-visible spectroscopy, SEM, and XRD. The effect of various concentration of PbS NP on the optical properties of the composite has been studied to understand the optimum conditions for the synthesis process. The nanocomposite film shows high UV and visible light absorptions in the wavelength range of (200-500) nm, which correspond to the characteristics of the PbS NPs. The significant decreasing trend of the direct allowed band gap of the nanocomposite was observed upon increasing the Pb source concentration, from (6.27 eV) for pure PVA to (2.34 eV) for 0.04 M PbS concentration, which is much higher than the energy gap of bulk PbS value (0.41 eV). The calculated values of the static refractive index of Cauchy dispersion model were in the range of (1.09-1.20). X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the cubic nanocrystalline PbS phase formation.

  • 4.
    Abebe, Mihret
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spherical and Porous Particles of Calcium Carbonate Synthesized with Food Friendly Polymer Additives2015In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 3609-3616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous calcium carbonate particles were synthesized by adding solutions of Ca2+ to solutions of CO32- containing polymeric additives. Under optimized conditions well-defined aggregates of the anhydrous polymorph vaterite formed. A typical sample of these micrometer-sized aggregates had: a pore volume of 0.1 cm(3)/g, a pore width of similar to 10 nm, and a specific surface area of similar to 25-30 m(2)/ g. Only one mixing Order (calcium to carbonate) allowed the formation of vaterite, which was ascribed to the buffering capacity and relatively high pH of the CO32- solution. Rapid addition of the calcium chloride solution and rapid stirring promoted the formation of vaterite, due to the high supersaturation levels achieved. With xanthan gum, porous and micrometer-sized vaterite aggregates could be synthesized over a wide range of synthetic conditions. For the Other food grade polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), methylcellulose (MC), and sodium carboxyl methylcellulose, several intensive and extensive synthetic parameters had to be optimized to obtain pure vaterite and porous aggregates. HPMC and MC allowed well-defined spherical micrometer-sited particles to form. We expect that these spherical and porous particles of vaterite could be relevant to model studies as well as a controlled delivery of particularly large molecules.

  • 5. Abel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Nybom, Inna
    Maenpaa, Kimmo
    Hale, Sarah E.
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway.
    Akkanen, Jarkko
    Mixing and capping techniques for activated carbon based sediment remediation Efficiency and adverse effects for Lumbriculus variegatus2017In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 114, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Activated carbon (AC) has been proven to be highly effective for the in-situ remediation of sediments contaminated with a wide range of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, adverse biological effects, especially to benthic organisms, can accompany this promising remediation potential. In this study, we compare both the remediation potential and the biological effects of several AC materials for two application methods: mixing with sediment (MIX) at doses of 0.1 and 1.0% based on sediment dw and thin layer capping (TLC) with 0.6 and 1.2 kg AC/m(2). Significant dose dependent reductions in PCB bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus of 35-93% in MIX treatments were observed. Contaminant uptake in TLC treatments was reduced by up to 78% and differences between the two applied doses were small. Correspondingly, significant adverse effects were observed for L. variegatus whenever AC was present in the sediment. The lowest application dose of 0.1% AC in the MIX system reduced L variegatus growth, and 1.0% AC led to a net loss of organism biomass. All TLC treatments let to a loss of biomass in the test organism. Furthermore, mortality was observed with 1.2 kg ACim(2) doses of pure AC for the TLC treatment. The addition of clay (Kaolinite) to the TLC treatments prevented mortality, but did not decrease the loss in biomass. While TLC treatments pose a less laborious alternative for AC amendments in the field, the results of this study show that it has lower remediation potential and could be more harmful to the benthic fauna.

  • 6.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Carney, Rebecca M. D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS inner detector are described in this paper for different data-taking conditions in proton-proton, proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected during the first period of LHC operation (Run 1) and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with two different gas mixtures (xenon-based and argon-based) and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. These studies show that the tracking performance of the TRT is similar for the two gas mixtures and that a significant contribution to the particle momentum resolution is made by the TRT up to high particle densities.

  • 7.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Heyon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Petridis, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Modelling Z -> tau tau processes in ATLAS with tau-embedded Z -> mu mu data2015In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 10, article id P09018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the concept, technical realisation and validation of a largely data-driven method to model events with Z -> tau tau decays. In Z -> mu mu events selected from proton-proton collision data recorded at root s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012, the Z decay muons are replaced by tau leptons from simulated Z -> tau tau decays at the level of reconstructed tracks and calorimeter cells. The tau lepton kinematics are derived from the kinematics of the original muons. Thus, only the well-understood decays of the Z boson and tau leptons as well as the detector response to the tau decay products are obtained from simulation. All other aspects of the event, such as the Z boson and jet kinematics as well as effects from multiple interactions, are given by the actual data. This so-called tau-embedding method is particularly relevant for Higgs boson searches and analyses in tau tau final states, where Z -> tau tau decays constitute a large irreducible background that cannot be obtained directly from data control samples. In this paper, the relevant concepts are discussed based on the implementation used in the ATLAS Standard Model H -> tau tau analysis of the full datataset recorded during 2011 and 2012.

  • 8.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    A measurement of material in the ATLAS tracker using secondary hadronic interactions in 7 TeV p p collisions2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the material in the ATLAS inner tracking detector is crucial in under-standing the reconstruction of charged-particle tracks, the performance of algorithms that identify jets containing b-hadrons and is also essential to reduce background in searches for exotic particles that can decay within the inner detector volume. Interactions of primary hadrons produced in pp collisions with the material in the inner detector are used to map the location and amount of this material. The hadronic interactions of primary particles may result in secondary vertices, which in this analysis are reconstructed by an inclusive vertex-finding algorithm. Data were collected using minimum-bias triggers by the ATLAS detector operating at the LHC during 2010 at centre-of-mass energy root s = 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19 nb(-1). Kinematic properties of these secondary vertices are used to study the validity of the modelling of hadronic interactions in simulation. Secondary-vertex yields are compared between data and simulation over a volume of about 0.7m(3) around the interaction point, and agreement is found within overall uncertainties.

  • 9.
    Adiels, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Where did technology go?2011In: Positioning Technology Education in the curriculum / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2011, 1, p. 53-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10. Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Wang, Baoyuan
    Xia, Chen
    Zhang, Wei
    He, Yunjuan
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    Zhu, Bin
    Fabrication of novel electrolyte-layer free fuel cell with semi-ionic conductor (Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta- Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9) and Schottky barrier2016In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 328, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BSCF) is synthesized via a chemical co-precipitation technique for a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) (300-600 degrees C) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC) in a comprehensive study. The EFFC with a homogeneous mixture of samarium doped ceria (SDC): BSCF (60%:40% by weight) which is rather similar to the cathode (SDC: BSCF in 50%:50% by weight) used for a three layer SOFC demonstrates peak power densities up to 655 mW/cm(2), while a three layer (anode/ electrolyte/cathode) SOFC has reached only 425 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C. Chemical phase, crystal structure and morphology of the as-prepared sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of 3-layer SOFC and EFFC are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As-prepared BSCF has exhibited a maximum conductivity above 300 S/cm at 550 degrees C. High performance of the EFFC device corresponds to a balanced combination between ionic and electronic (holes) conduction characteristic. The Schottky barrier prevents the EFFC from the electronic short circuiting problem which also enhances power output. The results provide a new way to produce highly effective cathode materials for LTSOFC and semiconductor designs for EFFC functions using a semiconducting-ionic material.

  • 11.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Following the Assembly of Iron Oxide Nanocubes by Video Microscopy and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied the growth of ordered arrays by evaporation-induced self-assembly of iron oxide nanocubes with edge lengths of 6.8 and 10.1 nm using video microscopy (VM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Ex situ electron diffraction of the ordered arrays demonstrates that the crystal axes of the nanocubes are coaligned and confirms that the ordered arrays are mesocrystals. Time-resolved video microscopy shows that growth of the highly ordered arrays at slow solvent evaporation is controlled by particle diffusion and can be described by a simple growth model. The growth of each mesocrystal depends only on the number of nanoparticles within the accessible region irrespective of the relative time of formation. The mass of the dried mesocrystals estimated from the analysis of the bandwidth-shift-to-frequency-shift ratio correlates well with the total mass of the oleate-coated nanoparticles in the deposited dispersion drop.

  • 12. Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Fors, Carina
    Anund, Anna
    Hallvig, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Video-based observer rated sleepiness versus self-reported subjective sleepiness in real road driving2015In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Observer-rated sleepiness (ORS) based on video recordings of the driver's face is often used when analysing naturalistic driving data. The aim of this study is to investigate if ORS ratings agree with subjective self-reported sleepiness (SRS). Methods: Forty raters assessed 54 video-clips showing drivers with varying levels of sleepiness. The video-clips were recorded during a field experiment focusing on driver sleepiness using the same cameras that are typically used in large-scale field studies. The weak results prompted a second test. Ten human factors researchers made pairwise comparisons of videos showing the same four participants in an alert versus a very sleepy condition. The task was simply to select the video-clip where the driver was sleepy. Results: The overall average percentage of video segments where ORS and SRS matched was 41 % in Test 1. ORS 0 (alert) and ORS 2 (very sleepy) were easier to score than ORS 1 and it was slightly harder to rate night-time drives. Inter-rater agreement was low, with average Pearson's r correlations of 0.19 and Krippendorff's alpha of 0.15. In Test 2, the average Pearson's r correlations was 0.35 and Krippendorff's alpha was 0.62. The correspondence between ORS and SRS showed an agreement of 35 %. Conclusions: The results indicate that ORS ratings based on real road video recordings correspond poorly with SRS and have low inter-rater agreement. Further research is necessary in order to further evaluate the usefulness of ORS as a measure of sleepiness.

  • 13.
    Ahmed, Trifa M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Emissions of particulate associated oxygenated and native polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from vehicles powered by ethanol/gasoline fuel blends2018In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 214, p. 381-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emission factors for oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) and PAHs have been determined from two different fuel flexible light duty vehicles operated at -7 degrees C in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and at +22 degrees C in the Artemis Driving Cycle (ADC). Three different gasoline/ethanol blends, commercially available in Sweden, were tested i.e., gasoline E5, with 5% v/v ethanol and ethanol fuel E85 with 85% v/v ethanol and winter time quality E70 with 70% v/v ethanol, respectively. The results showed greatly increased emissions of both OPAHs and PAHs at cold engine start conditions (-7 degrees C in the NEDC) compared to warm engine start (+ 22 degrees C in the ADC). For the OPAHs, higher average total emission factors were obtained when running on E85 compared to E5 at both cold 2.72 mu g/km vs 1.11 mu g/km and warm 0.19 mu g/km vs 0.11 mu g/km starting conditions with the highest emissions when using E70 at -7 degrees C 4.12 mu g/km. The same trend was found for the PAHs at cold engine start with higher average total emission factors when using ethanol fuel 71.5 mu g/km and 60.0 mu g/km for E70 and E85, respectively compared to gasoline E5 (20.2 mu g/km). Slightly higher average total PAH emissions were obtained when operating at + 22 degrees C with E5 compared to with E85 1.23 mu g/km vs 0.72 mu g/km.

  • 14.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dumm, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wolf, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, U.S.A..
    Very high-energy gamma-ray follow-up program using neutrino triggers from IceCube2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe and report the status of a neutrino-triggered program in IceCube that generates real-time alerts for gamma-ray follow-up observations by atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS). While IceCube is capable of monitoring the whole sky continuously, high-energy gamma-ray telescopes have restricted fields of view and in general are unlikely to be observing a potential neutrino-flaring source at the time such neutrinos are recorded. The use of neutrino-triggered alerts thus aims at increasing the availability of simultaneous multi-messenger data during potential neutrino flaring activity, which can increase the discovery potential and constrain the phenomenological interpretation of the high-energy emission of selected source classes (e. g. blazars). The requirements of a fast and stable online analysis of potential neutrino signals and its operation are presented, along with first results of the program operating between 14 March 2012 and 31 December 2015.

  • 15. Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.
    et al.
    Higueras, Manuel
    Puig, Pedro
    Einbeck, Jochen
    Samaga, Daniel
    Francesc Barquinero, Joan
    Barrios, Lleonard
    Brzozowska, Beata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Fattibene, Paola
    Gregoire, Eric
    Jaworska, Alicja
    Lloyd, David
    Oestreicher, Ursula
    Romm, Horst
    Rothkamm, Kai
    Roy, Laurence
    Sommer, Sylwester
    Terzoudi, Georgia
    Thierens, Hubert
    Trompier, Francois
    Vral, Anne
    Woda, Clemens
    Uncertainty of fast biological radiation dose assessment for emergency response scenarios2017In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Reliable dose estimation is an important factor in appropriate dosimetric triage categorization of exposed individuals to support radiation emergency response. Materials and methods: Following work done under the EU FP7 MULTIBIODOSE and RENEB projects, formal methods for defining uncertainties on biological dose estimates are compared using simulated and real data from recent exercises. Results: The results demonstrate that a Bayesian method of uncertainty assessment is the most appropriate, even in the absence of detailed prior information. The relative accuracy and relevance of techniques for calculating uncertainty and combining assay results to produce single dose and uncertainty estimates is further discussed. Conclusions: Finally, it is demonstrated that whatever uncertainty estimation method is employed, ignoring the uncertainty on fast dose assessments can have an important impact on rapid biodosimetric categorization.

  • 16. Ainsbury, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Badie, Christophe
    Barnard, Stephen
    Manning, Grainne
    Moquet, Jayne
    Abend, Michael
    Antunes, Ana Catarina
    Barrios, Lleonard
    Bassinet, Celine
    Beinke, Christina
    Bortolin, Emanuela
    Bossin, Lily
    Bricknell, Clare
    Brzoska, Kamil
    Buraczewska, Iwona
    Huertas Castano, Carlos
    Cemusova, Zina
    Christiansson, Maria
    Mateos Cordero, Santiago
    Coster, Guillaume
    Della Monac, Sara
    Desangles, Francois
    Discher, Michael
    Dominguez, Inmaculada
    Doucha-Senf, Sven
    Eakins, Jon
    Fattibene, Paola
    Filippi, Silvia
    Frenzel, Monika
    Georgieva, Dimka
    Gregoire, Eric
    Guogyte, Kamile
    Hadjidekova, Valeria
    Hadjiiska, Ljubomira
    Hristova, Rositsa
    Karakosta, Maria
    Kis, Eniko
    Kriehuber, Ralf
    Lee, Jungil
    Lloyd, David
    Lumniczky, Katalin
    Lyng, Fiona
    Macaeva, Ellina
    Majewski, Matthaeus
    Vanda Martins, S.
    McKeever, Stephen W. S.
    Meade, Aidan
    Medipally, Dinesh
    Meschini, Roberta
    M'kacher, Radhia
    Gil, Octavia Monteiro
    Montero, Alegria
    Moreno, Mercedes
    Noditi, Mihaela
    Oestreicher, Ursula
    Oskamp, Dominik
    Palitti, Fabrizio
    Palma, Valentina
    Pantelias, Gabriel
    Pateux, Jerome
    Patrono, Clarice
    Pepe, Gaetano
    Port, Matthias
    Jesus Prieto, Maria
    Quattrini, Maria Cristina
    Quintens, Roel
    Ricoul, Michelle
    Roy, Laurence
    Sabatier, Laure
    Sebastia, Natividad
    Sholom, Sergey
    Sommer, Sylwester
    Staynova, Albena
    Strunz, Sonja
    Terzoudi, Georgia
    Testa, Antonella
    Trompier, Francois
    Valente, Marco
    Van Hoey, Olivier
    Veronese, Ivan
    Wojcik, Andrzej
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Woda, Clemens
    Integration of new biological and physical retrospective dosimetry methods into EU emergency response plans - joint RENEB and EURADOS inter-laboratory comparisons2017In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: RENEB, 'Realising the European Network of Biodosimetry and Physical Retrospective Dosimetry,' is a network for research and emergency response mutual assistance in biodosimetry within the EU. Within this extremely active network, a number of new dosimetry methods have recently been proposed or developed. There is a requirement to test and/or validate these candidate techniques and inter-comparison exercises are a well-established method for such validation. Materials and methods: The authors present details of inter-comparisons of four such new methods: dicentric chromosome analysis including telomere and centromere staining; the gene expression assay carried out in whole blood; Raman spectroscopy on blood lymphocytes, and detection of radiation induced thermoluminescent signals in glass screens taken from mobile phones. Results: In general the results show good agreement between the laboratories and methods within the expected levels of uncertainty, and thus demonstrate that there is a lot of potential for each of the candidate techniques. Conclusions: Further work is required before the new methods can be included within the suite of reliable dosimetry methods for use by RENEB partners and others in routine and emergency response scenarios.

  • 17.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sjöberg, Erik
    Korelskiy, Danil
    Rayson, Mark
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Preparation of graded silicalite-1 substrates for all-zeolite membranes with excellent CO2/H-2 separation performance2015In: Journal of Membrane Science, ISSN 0376-7388, E-ISSN 1873-3123, Vol. 493, p. 206-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graded silicalite-1 substrates with a high gas permeability and low surface roughness have been produced by pulsed current processing of a thin coating of a submicron silicalite-1 powder onto a powder body of coarser silicalite-1 crystals. Thin zeolite films have been hydrothermally grown onto the graded silicalite-1 support and the all-zeolite membranes display an excellent CO2/H-2 separation factor of 12 at 0 degrees C and a CO2 permeance of 21.3 x 10(-7) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa-1 for an equimolar CO2/H-2 feed at 505 kPa and 101 kPa helium sweep gas. Thermal cracking estimates based on calculated surface energies and measured thermal expansion coefficients suggest that all-zeolite membranes with a minimal thermal expansion mismatch between the graded substrate and the zeolite film should remain crack-free during thermal cycling and the critical calcination step.

  • 18. Akmete, A.
    et al.
    Alexandrov, A.
    Anokhina, A.
    Aoki, S.
    Atkin, E.
    Azorskiy, N.
    Back, J. J.
    Bagulya, A.
    Baranov, A.
    Barker, G. J.
    Bay, A.
    Bayliss, V.
    Bencivenni, G.
    Berdnikov, A. Y.
    Berdnikov, Y. A.
    Bertani, M.
    Betancourt, C.
    Bezshyiko, I.
    Bezshyyko, O.
    Bick, D.
    Bieschke, S.
    Blanco, A.
    Boehm, J.
    Bogomilov, M.
    Bondarenko, K.
    Bonivento, W. M.
    Boyarsky, A.
    Brenner, R.
    Breton, D.
    Brundler, R.
    Bruschi, M.
    Buscher, V.
    Buonaura, A.
    Buontempo, S.
    Cadeddu, S.
    Calcaterra, A.
    Campanelli, M.
    Chauveau, J.
    Chepurnov, A.
    Chernyavsky, M.
    Choi, K. -Y.
    Chumakov, A.
    Ciambrone, P.
    Dallavalle, G. M.
    D'Ambrosio, N.
    D'Appollonio, G.
    De Lellis, G.
    De Roeck, A.
    De Serio, M.
    Dedenko, L.
    Di Crescenzo, A.
    Di Marco, N.
    Dib, C.
    Dijkstra, H.
    Dmitrenko, V.
    Domenici, D.
    Donskov, S.
    Dubreuil, A.
    Ebert, J.
    Enik, T.
    Etenko, A.
    Fabbri, F.
    Fabbri, L.
    Fedin, O.
    Fedorova, G.
    Felici, G.
    Ferro-Luzzi, M.
    Fini, R. A.
    Fonte, P.
    Franco, C.
    Fukuda, T.
    Galati, G.
    Gavrilov, G.
    Gerlach, S.
    Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.
    Golubkov, D.
    Golutvin, A.
    Gorbunov, D.
    Gorbunov, S.
    Gorkavenko, V.
    Gornushkin, Y.
    Gorshenkov, M.
    Grachev, V.
    Graverini, E.
    Grichine, V.
    Guler, A. M.
    Guz, Yu.
    Hagner, C.
    Hakobyan, H.
    van Herwijnen, E.
    Hollnagel, A.
    Hosseini, B.
    Hushchyn, M.
    Iaselli, G.
    Iuliano, A.
    Jacobsson, R.
    Jonker, M.
    Kadenko, I.
    Kamiscioglu, C.
    Kamiscioglu, M.
    Khabibullin, M.
    Khaustov, G.
    Khotyantsev, A.
    Kim, S. H.
    Kim, V.
    Kim, Y. G.
    Kitagawa, N.
    Ko, J. -W.
    Kodama, K.
    Kolesnikov, A.
    Kolev, D. I.
    Kolosov, V.
    Komatsu, M.
    Konovalova, N.
    Korkmaz, M. A.
    Korol, I.
    Korol'ko, I.
    Korzenev, A.
    Kovalenko, S.
    Krasilnikova, I.
    Krivova, K.
    Kudenko, Y.
    Kurochka, V.
    Kuznetsova, E.
    Lacker, H. M.
    Lai, A.
    Lanfranchi, G.
    Lantwin, O.
    Lauria, A.
    Lebbolo, H.
    Lee, K. Y.
    Levy, J. -M.
    Lopes, L.
    Lyubovitskij, V.
    Maalmi, J.
    Magnan, A.
    Maleev, V.
    Malinin, A.
    Mefodev, A.
    Mermod, P.
    Mikado, S.
    Mikhaylov, Yu.
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mineev, O.
    Montanari, A.
    Montesi, M. C.
    Morishima, K.
    Movchan, S.
    Naganawa, N.
    Nakamura, M.
    Nakano, T.
    Novikov, A.
    Obinyakov, B.
    Ogawa, S.
    Okateva, N.
    Owen, P. H.
    Paoloni, A.
    Park, B. D.
    Paparella, L.
    Pastore, A.
    Patel, M.
    Pereyma, D.
    Petrenko, D.
    Petridis, K.
    Podgrudkov, D.
    Poliakov, V.
    Polukhina, N.
    Prokudin, M.
    Prota, A.
    Rademakers, A.
    Ratnikov, F.
    Rawlings, T.
    Razeti, M.
    Redi, F.
    Ricciardi, S.
    Roganova, T.
    Rogozhnikov, A.
    Rokujo, H.
    Rosa, G.
    Rovelli, T.
    Ruchayskiy, O.
    Ruf, T.
    Samoylenko, V.
    Saputi, A.
    Sato, O.
    Savchenko, E. S.
    Schmidt-Parzefall, W.
    Serra, N.
    Shakin, A.
    Shaposhnikov, M.
    Shatalov, P.
    Shchedrina, T.
    Shchutska, L.
    Shevchenko, V.
    Shibuya, H.
    Shustov, A.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simone, S.
    Skorokhvatov, M.
    Smirnov, S.
    Sohn, J. Y.
    Sokolenko, A.
    Starkov, N.
    Storaci, B.
    Strolin, P.
    Takahashi, S.
    Timiryasov, I.
    Tioukov, V.
    Tosi, N.
    Treille, D.
    Tsenov, R.
    Ulin, S.
    Ustyuzhanin, A.
    Uteshev, Z.
    Vankova-Kirilova, G.
    Vannucci, F.
    Venkova, P.
    Vilchinski, S.
    Villa, M.
    Vlasik, K.
    Volkov, A.
    Voronkov, R.
    Wanke, R.
    Woo, J. -K.
    Wurm, M.
    Xella, S.
    Yilmaz, D.
    Yilmazer, A. U.
    Yoon, C. S.
    Zaytsev, Yu.
    The active muon shield in the SHiP experiment2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SHiP experiment is designed to search for very weakly interacting particles beyond the Standard Model which are produced in a 400 GeV/c proton beam dump at the CERN SPS. An essential task for the experiment is to keep the Standard Model background level to less than 0.1 event after 2 x 10(20) protons on target. In the beam dump, around 10(11) muons will be produced per second. The muon rate in the spectrometer has to be reduced by at least four orders of magnitude to avoid muon-induced combinatorial background. A novel active muon shield is used to magnetically deflect the muons out of the acceptance of the spectrometer. This paper describes the basic principle of such a shield, its optimization and its performance.

  • 19.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

  • 20. Alcamán, M. Estrella
    et al.
    Alcorta, Jaime
    Bergman, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Vásquez, Mónica
    Polz, Martin
    Díez, Beatriz
    Physiological and gene expression responses to nitrogen regimes and temperatures in Mastigocladus sp strain CHP1, a predominant thermotolerant cyanobacterium of hot springs2017In: Systematic and Applied Microbiology, ISSN 0723-2020, E-ISSN 1618-0984, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 102-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are widely distributed primary producers with significant implications for the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen. Diazotrophic cyanobacteria of subsection V (Order Stigonematales) are particularly ubiquitous in photoautotrophic microbial mats of hot springs. The Stigonematal cyanobacterium strain CHPI isolated from the Porcelana hot spring (Chile) was one of the major contributors of the new nitrogen through nitrogen fixation. Further morphological and genetic characterization verified that the strain CHP1 belongs to Stigonematales, and it formed a separate Glade together with other thermophiles of the genera Fischerella and Mastigocladus. Strain CHP1 fixed maximum N-2 in the light, independent of the temperature range. At 50 degrees C niJH gene transcripts showed high expression during the light period, whereas the nifH gene expression at 45 degrees C was arrhythmic. The strain displayed a high affinity for nitrate and a low tolerance for high ammonium concentrations, whereas the narB and glnA genes showed higher expression in light and at the beginning of the dark phase. It is proposed that Mastigocladus sp. strain CHPI would represent a good model for the study of subsection V thermophilic cyanobacteria, and for understanding the adaptations of these photoautotrophic organisms inhabiting microbial mats in hot springs globally.

  • 21. Ali, Raja H.
    et al.
    Bark, Mikael
    Miró, Jorge
    Muhammad, Sayyed A.
    Sjöstrand, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA). Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Sweden.
    Zubair, Syed M.
    Abbas, Raja M.
    Arvestad, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA). Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Sweden.
    VMCMC: a graphical and statistical analysis tool for Markov chain Monte Carlo traces2017In: BMC Bioinformatics, ISSN 1471-2105, E-ISSN 1471-2105, Vol. 18, article id 97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: MCMC-based methods are important for Bayesian inference of phylogeny and related parameters. Although being computationally expensive, MCMC yields estimates of posterior distributions that are useful for estimating parameter values and are easy to use in subsequent analysis. There are, however, sometimes practical difficulties with MCMC, relating to convergence assessment and determining burn-in, especially in large-scale analyses. Currently, multiple software are required to perform, e.g., convergence, mixing and interactive exploration of both continuous and tree parameters.

    Results: We have written a software called VMCMC to simplify post-processing of MCMC traces with, for example, automatic burn-in estimation. VMCMC can also be used both as a GUI-based application, supporting interactive exploration, and as a command-line tool suitable for automated pipelines.

    Conclusions: VMCMC is a free software available under the New BSD License. Executable jar files, tutorial manual and source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket. org/rhali/visualmcmc/.

  • 22.
    Almberg, Wah-Sui
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Boman, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    An active agent portfolio management algorithm2005In: Artificial intelligence and computer science / [ed] Susan Shannon, Hauppauge, N.Y.: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2005, p. 127-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Structural modeling of membrane transporter proteins2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental process of all living organisms - the transport of molecules across cellular membranes through membrane transport proteins - is investigated.

    After a brief review of general properties of biological membranes follows a recollection of the major methods of membrane transport that Nature utilizes (Chapter 1). This is followed by a description of important experimental (Chapter 2) and theoretical methods (Chapter 3) for structural studies of membrane proteins. The findings on membrane protein transport in papers I-IV are then summarized (Chapter 4) and important findings are discussed. The remaining text is a discussion on relevant theoretical and experimental methods.

  • 24. Alves, Andreia
    et al.
    Giovanoulis, Georgios
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Erratico, Claudio
    Lucattini, Luisa
    Haug, Line S.
    Jacobs, Griet
    de Wit, Cynthia A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Leonards, Pim E. G.
    Covaci, Adrian
    Magner, Jorgen
    Voorspoels, Stefan
    Case Study on Screening Emerging Pollutants in Urine and Nails2017In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 4046-4053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alternative plasticizers and flame retardants (FRs) have been introduced as replacements for banned or restricted chemicals, but much is still unknown about their metabolism and occurrence in humans. We identified the metabolites formed in vitro for four alternative plasticizers (acetyltributyl citrate (ATBC), bis(2-propylheptyl) phthalate (DPHP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (DEHTP), bis(2ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA)), and one FR (2,2-bis (chloromethyl)-propane-1,3-diyltetrakis(2-chloroethyl) bisphosphate (V6)). Further, these compounds and their metabolites were investigated by LC/ESI-Orbitrap-MS in urine and finger nails collected from a Norwegian cohort. Primary and secondary ATBC metabolites had detection frequencies (% DF) in finger nails ranging from 46 to 95%. V6 was identified for the first time in finger nails, suggesting that this matrix may also indicate past exposure to FRs as well as alternative plasticizers. Two isomeric forms of DEHTP primary metabolite were highly detected in urine (97% DF) and identified in finger nails, while no DPHP metabolites were detected in vivo. Primary and secondary DEHA metabolites were identified in both matrices, and the relative proportion of the secondary metabolites was higher in urine than in finger nails; the opposite was observed for the primary metabolites. As many of the metabolites present in in vitro extracts were further identified in vivo in urine and finger nail samples, this suggests that in vitro assays can reliably mimic the in vivo processes. Finger nails may be a useful noninvasive matrix for human biomonitoring of specific organic contaminants, but further validation is needed.

  • 25. Amaya, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Pathak, Harshad
    Modak, Viraj P.
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Loh, N. Duane
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, United States; KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    McQueen, Trevor A.
    Hayes, Matt J.
    Williams, Garth J.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Acceleratory Laboratory, United States.
    Stan, Claudiu A.
    Wyslouzil, Barbara E.
    How Cubic Can Ice Be?2017In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1948-7185, E-ISSN 1948-7185, Vol. 8, no 14, p. 3216-3222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an X-ray laser, we investigated the crystal structure of ice formed by homogeneous ice nucleation in deeply supercooled water nanodrops (r approximate to 10 nm) at similar to 225 K The nanodrops were formed by condensation of vapor in a supersonic nozzle, and the ice was probed within 100 mu s of freezing using femtosecond wide-angle X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron X-ray laser. The X-ray diffraction spectra indicate that this ice has a metastable, predominantly cubic structure; the shape of the first ice diffraction peak suggests stacking-disordered ice with a cubicity value, chi, in the range of 0.78 +/- 0.05. The cubicity value determined here is higher than those determined in experiments with micron-sized drops but comparable to those found in molecular dynamics simulations. The high cubicity is most likely caused by the extremely low freezing temperatures and by the rapid freezing, which occurs on a similar to 1 mu s time scale in single nanodroplets.

  • 26. Aminlashgari, Nina
    et al.
    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Ilag, Leopold L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    Nanocomposites as novel surfaces for laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry2011In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to utilize nanocomposite films as easy-to-handle surfaces for surface assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) of small molecules, such as pharmaceutical compounds, was evaluated. The signal-to-noise values of acebutolol, propranolol and carbamazepine obtained on the nanocomposite surfaces were higher than the values obtained on plain PLA surface showing that the nanoparticles participate in the ionization/desorption process even when they are immobilized in the polymer matrix. The advantages of nanocomposite films compared to the free nanoparticles used in earlier studies are the ease of handling and reduction of instrument contamination since the particles are immobilized into the polymer matrix. Eight inorganic nanoparticles, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, montmorillonite nanoclay, halloysite nanoclay, silicon nitride and graphitized carbon black at different concentrations were solution casted to films with polylactide (PLA). There were large differences in signal intensities depending on the type of drug, type of nanoparticle and the concentration of nanoparticles. Polylactide with 10% titanium oxide or 10% silicon nitride functioned best as SALDI-MS surfaces. The limit of detection (LOD) for the study was ranging from 1.7 ppm up to 56.3 ppm and the signal to noise relative standard deviations for the surface containing 10% silicon nitride was approximately 20-30%. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated in most cases a good distribution of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix and contact angle measurements showed increasing hydrophobicity when the nanoparticle concentration was increased, which could influence the desorption and ionization. Overall, the results show that nanocomposite films have potential as surfaces for SALDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  • 27. An, Di
    et al.
    Li, Hezhen
    Xie, Zhipeng
    Zhu, Tianbin
    Luo, Xudong
    Shen, Zhijian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Tsinghua University, China.
    Ma, Jing
    Additive manufacturing and characterization of complex Al2O3 parts based on a novel stereolithography method2017In: International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology, ISSN 1546-542X, E-ISSN 1744-7402, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 836-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we prepared Al2O3 ceramic green parts with complex geometry and architecture using an additive manufacturing process based on stereolithography. The rheological and thermal behavior of Al2O3 slurry was firstly examined and used to establish the conditions for molding and debinding. As opposed to previous researches that only focused on manufacture techniques, the sintering behavior and densification process were systematically investigated. In addition, special attentions were paid to the evolution of microstructure between green bodies and sintered parts. The results showed that debound parts were equipped with uniform particle packing and narrow pore size distribution. The dimensions of the Al2O3 parts changed anisotropically with the different processing steps. The densification process was greatly accelerated by the decrease in pore size and annihilating of interconnected pores in which significant grain growth was observed above 1450 degrees C. The sintered part also had a homogeneous microstructure and no interface between adjacent layers. High densification (relative density of 99.1%) and much desirable Vickers hardness (17.9 GPa) of Al2O3 parts were achieved at the sintering temperature of 1650 degrees C.

  • 28. Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Meier, H. E. Markus
    Ripszam, Matyas
    Rowe, Owen
    Wikner, Johan
    Haglund, Peter
    Eilola, Kari
    Legrand, Catherine
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Tysklind, Mats
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Projected future climate change and Baltic Sea ecosystem management2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, p. S345-S356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is likely to have large effects on the Baltic Sea ecosystem. Simulations indicate 2-4 degrees C warming and 50-80 % decrease in ice cover by 2100. Precipitation may increase similar to 30 % in the north, causing increased land runoff of allochthonous organic matter (AOM) and organic pollutants and decreased salinity. Coupled physical-biogeochemical models indicate that, in the south, bottom-water anoxia may spread, reducing cod recruitment and increasing sediment phosphorus release, thus promoting cyanobacterial blooms. In the north, heterotrophic bacteria will be favored by AOM, while phytoplankton production may be reduced. Extra trophic levels in the food web may increase energy losses and consequently reduce fish production. Future management of the Baltic Sea must consider the effects of climate change on the ecosystem dynamics and functions, as well as the effects of anthropogenic nutrient and pollutant load. Monitoring should have a holistic approach, encompassing both autotrophic (phytoplankton) and heterotrophic (e.g., bacterial) processes.

  • 29.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Deng, Junjun
    Du, Ke
    Zheng, Mei
    Yan, Caiqing
    Sköld, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Regionally-Varying Combustion Sources of the January 2013 Severe Haze Events over Eastern China2015In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 2038-2043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thick haze plagued northeastern China in January 2013, strongly affecting both regional climate and human respiratory health. Here, we present dual carbon isotope constrained (Delta C-14 and delta C-13) source apportionment for combustion-derived black carbon aerosol (BC) for three key hotspot regions (megacities): North China Plain (NCP, Beijing), the Yangtze River Delta (YRD, Shanghai), and the Pearl River Delta (PRD, Guangzhou) for January 2013. BC, here quantified as elemental carbon (EC), is one of the most health-detrimental components of PM2.5 and a strong climate warming agent. The results show that these severe haze events were equally affected (similar to 30%) by biomass combustion in all three regions, whereas the sources of the dominant fossil fuel component was dramatically different between north and south. In the NCP region, coal combustion accounted for 66% (46-74%, 95% C.I.) of the EC, whereas, in the YRD and PRD regions, liquid fossil fuel combustion (e.g., traffic) stood for 46% (18-66%) and 58% (38-68%), respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest the need for a regionally-specific description of BC sources in climate models and regionally-tailored mitigation to combat severe air pollution events in East Asia.

  • 30.
    Andersson, Linnéa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Stockholm.
    Evaluating pore space in macroporous ceramics with water-based porosimetry2013In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1916-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that water-based porosimetry (WBP), a facile, simple, and nondestructive porosimetry technique, accurately evaluates both the pore size distribution and throat size distribution of sacrificially templated macroporous alumina. The pore size distribution and throat size distribution derived from the WBP evaluation in uptake (imbibition) and release (drainage) mode, respectively, were corroborated by mercury porosimetry and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). In contrast with mercury porosimetry, the WBP also provided information on the presence of “dead-end pores” in the macroporous alumina.

  • 31.
    Andersson, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Estimating Phosphorus in rivers of Central Sweden using Landsat TM data2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus flowing via rivers into the Baltic Sea is a major source of nutrients, and in some cases the limiting factor for the growth of algae which causes the phenomenon known as eutrophication. Remote sensing of phosphorus, here using Landsat TM-data, can help to give a better understanding of the process of eutrophication. Since Landsat TM-data is used, this could form a basis for further spatio-temporal analysis in the Baltic Sea region. A method originally described and previously applied for a Chinese river is here transferred and applied to three different rivers flowing into the Baltic Sea. The results show that by measuring the proxy variables of Secchi Depth and Chloryphyll-a the remote sensing model is able to explain 41% of the variance in total- phosphorus for the rivers Dalälven, Norrström and Gavleån without any consideration taken to CDOM, turbidity or other local features.

  • 32. Andreassen, Björn
    et al.
    Holmberg, Rickard
    Brahme, Anders
    Janek Strååt, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Medical Radiation Physics (together with KI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    PET/CT measurements and GEANT4 simulations of the inducedpositron activity from high energy scanned photon beamsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33. Angelstam, Per
    et al.
    Andersson, Kjell
    Annerstedt, Matilda
    Axelsson, Robert
    Elbakidze, Marine
    Garrido, Pablo
    Grahn, Patrik
    Jonsson, K. Ingemar
    Pedersen, Simen
    Schlyter, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Skärbäck, Erik
    Smith, Mike
    Stjernquist, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Solving Problems in Social-Ecological Systems: Definition, Practice and Barriers of Transdisciplinary Research2013In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 254-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Translating policies about sustainable development as a social process and sustainability outcomes into the real world of social-ecological systems involves several challenges. Hence, research policies advocate improved innovative problem-solving capacity. One approach is transdisciplinary research that integrates research disciplines, as well as researchers and practitioners. Drawing upon 14 experiences of problem-solving, we used group modeling to map perceived barriers and bridges for researchers' and practitioners' joint knowledge production and learning towards transdisciplinary research. The analysis indicated that the transdisciplinary research process is influenced by (1) the amount of traditional disciplinary formal and informal control, (2) adaptation of project applications to fill the transdisciplinary research agenda, (3) stakeholder participation, and (4) functional team building/development based on self-reflection and experienced leadership. Focusing on implementation of green infrastructure policy as a common denominator for the delivery of ecosystem services and human well-being, we discuss how to diagnose social-ecological systems, and use knowledge production and collaborative learning as treatments.

  • 34.
    Antevik, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Utvärdering av efterinjektering med polyuretan utifrån geologiska och hydrogeologiska grundförutsättningar2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this master thesis is to evaluate the results of selective post-excavation grouting with polyurethane resin in the subway of Stockholm.Dripping and leakage of water into hard rock tunnels is a costly and commonly occurring problem. Water leakage does not only lead to damage to tunnel installation but may also affect the area above the tunnel due to lowering of the ground water table. To solve this problem there are several methods to prevent water entering the tunnel or to divert it. One of the preventing methods are to grout using polyurethane based resins.This thesis evaluates a drip sealing project where eight point leakages where grouted during November 2015. Drip mapping was carried out before and after the grouting to evaluate the change in leakage amount to determine whether the grouting methodology is suitable for future projects. The drip mapping was carried out during a year before the sealing attempt to investigate the leakages natural variation and with greater certainty being able to evaluate the leakage change after the grouting had been carried out.The evaluation of the grouting showed that none of the point leakages were sealed to 100 %. Only three of the leakages decreased, four increased and one showed no change. The natural variations during the evaluation period, during and after the grouting attempt indicates a natural rise in leakage amount induced by an increase in precipitation and rising seasonal trend.The change in leakage amount for every leakage point was compared to geological and hydrogeological parameters to be able to explain the cause of the results and to determine which conditions the methodology depends on. The correlation with original leakage amount, grouting volume and hydraulic aperture where the strongest and could best be explained by second degree polynomials. By using the equations for the polynomials an interval could be determined where the grouting methodology theoretically would lead to the greatest decrease in leakage amount. There are some uncertainty in the interpretation whether a natural signal in the grouting results led to a correlation due to an internal coupling between the parameters.

  • 35.
    Apostolopoulou-Kalkavoura, Varvara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lavoine, Nathalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Thermal conductivity of hygroscopic foams based on cellulose nanofibrils and a nonionic polyoxamer2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 1117-1126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose-based lightweight foams are promising alternatives to fossil-based insulation materials for energy-efficient buildings. The properties of cellulose-based materials are strongly influenced by moisture and there is a need to assess and better understand how the thermal conductivity of nanocellulose-based foams depends on the relative humidity and temperature. Here, we report a customized setup for measuring the thermal conductivity of hydrophilic materials under controlled temperature and relative humidity conditions. The thermal conductivity of isotropic foams based on cellulose nanofibrils and a nonionic polyoxamer, and an expanded polystyrene foam was measured over a wide range of temperatures and relative humidity. We show that a previously developed model is unable to capture the strong relative humidity dependence of the thermal conductivity of the hygroscopic, low-density nanocellulose- and nonionic polyoxamer-based foam. Analysis of the moisture uptake and moisture transport was used to develop an empirical model that takes into consideration the moisture content and the wet density of the investigated foam. The new empirical model could predict the thermal conductivity of a foam with a similar composition but almost 3 times higher density. Accurate measurements of the thermal conductivity at controlled temperature and relative humidity and availability of simple models to better predict the thermal conductivity of hygroscopic, low-density foams are necessary for the development of nanocellulose-based insulation materials.

  • 36. Arnot, Jon A.
    et al.
    Armitage, James M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    McCarty, Lynn S.
    Wania, Frank
    Cousins, Ian T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Toose-Reid, Liisa
    Toward a Consistent Evaluative Framework for POP Risk Characterization2011In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of Annex E in the Stockholm Convention (SC) on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) is to assess whether a chemical is likely, as a result of its long-range environmental transport, to lead to significant adverse human health or environmental effects, such that global action is warranted. To date, risk profiles for nominated POPs have not consistently selected assessment endpoints or completed mandated risk characterizations. An assessment endpoint hierarchy is proposed to facilitate risk characterization for the implementation of the SC. The framework is illustrated for a nominated POP, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), using three risk estimation methods. Based on current monitoring and toxicity data, the screening-level results indicate that humans and ecological receptors in remote regions such as the Arctic are unlikely to experience significant adverse effects (i.e., low risk) due to long-range environmental transport of HBCD. The results for birds are more uncertain than the results for fish and mammals due to the paucity of avian toxicity data. Risk characterization results for HBCD and for some listed POPs are compared to illustrate how the proposed methods can further assist decision-making and chemical management.

  • 37. Avadi, Angel
    et al.
    Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. WorldFish, Malaysia.
    Vázquez-Rowe, Ian
    Ziegler, Friederike
    Towards improved practices in Life Cycle Assessment of seafood and other aquatic products2018In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 979-981Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) X-ray Astronomy Satellite2018In: Journal of Astronomical Telescopes Instruments and Systems, ISSN 2329-4124, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 021402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission is the sixth Japanese x-ray astronomy satellite developed by a large international collaboration, including Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe. The mission aimed to provide the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E > 2 keV, using a microcalorimeter instrument, and to cover a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft x-rays to gamma rays. After a successful launch on February 17, 2016, the spacecraft lost its function on March 26, 2016, but the commissioning phase for about a month provided valuable information on the onboard instruments and the spacecraft system, including astrophysical results obtained from first light observations. The paper describes the Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission, its capabilities, the initial operation, and the instruments/spacecraft performances confirmed during the commissioning operations for about a month.

  • 39. Azuara, Manuel
    et al.
    Baguer, Barbara
    Villacampa, Jose I.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Manya, Joan J.
    Influence of pressure and temperature on key physicochemical properties of corn stover-derived biochar2016In: Fuel, ISSN 0016-2361, E-ISSN 1873-7153, Vol. 186, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on analyzing the effect of both the peak temperature and pressure on the properties of biochar produced through slow pyrolysis of corn stover, which is a common agricultural waste that currently has little or no value. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor at different peak temperatures (400, 525 and 650 degrees C) and absolute pressures (0.1, 0.85 and 1.6 MPa). The inert mass flow rate (at NTP conditions) was adjusted in each test to keep the gas residence time constant within the reactor. The as-received corn stover was pyrolyzed into a biochar without any physical pre-treatment as a way to reduce the operating costs. The properties of biochars showed that high peak temperature led to high fixed-carbon contents, high aromaticity and low molar H:C and O:C ratios; whereas a high pressure only resulted in a further decrease in the O:C ratio and a further increase in the fixed-carbon content. Increasing the operating pressure also resulted in a higher production of pyrolysis gas at the expense of water formation.

  • 40.
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Cheung, Ocean
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vasiliev, Petr
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Selective separation of CO2 and CH4 for biogas upgrading on zeolite NaKA and SAPO-562016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 162, p. 613-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several commercial and potential adsorbents were investigated for the separation of CO2 from CH4, which is relevant for the upgrading of raw biogas. The main focus of the paper was on the working capacities and selectivities of the adsorbents for a generic vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) process. Zeolites 4A and 13X had good estimated CO2-over-CH4 selectivities and reasonably high working capacities for the removal of CO2. A variant of zeolite A - vertical bar Na12-Kx vertical bar-LTA (with 1.8 <= x <= 3.2), had at least the same working capacity as zeolite 4A but with a significantly improved selectivity. Hence, the environmentally important CH4 slip can be minimized with this vertical bar Na12-Kx vertical bar-LTA sorbent. If a high working capacity for CO2 removal is the most important characteristic for a VSA process, then silicoaluminum phosphate, specifically SAPO-56, appeared to be the best candidate among the studied sorbents. In addition, SAPO-56 had a substantially high estimated CO2-over-CH4 selectivity with a value between similar to 20 and 30.

  • 41.
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Effects of carbon dioxide captured from ambient air on the infrared spectra of supported amines2016In: Vibrational Spectroscopy, ISSN 0924-2031, E-ISSN 1873-3697, Vol. 87, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino groups in highly dense coatings of amines on solid supports react with CO2 of ambient air and form ammonium-carbamate ion pairs. These ion pairs change the properties of the amine-modified supports. In numerous studies, the corresponding infrared (IR) spectra have been misinterpreted. The presumption has been that such ion pairs would not form in ambient air, and therefore IR bands have been assigned to moieties of the support and the amines. Here, we discuss common misunderstandings of the IR spectra of amine-modified supports and highlight that proper sample handling is necessary before employing different characterization techniques. We exemplify by performing an IR spectroscopic study of a propylamine-modified porous silica. Such amine-modified supports are relevant to applications in gas separation, catalysis, controlled drug delivery and adsorption of pollutants from water.

  • 42.
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zhang, Peng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ammonium-Carbamate-Rich Organogels for the Preparation of Amorphous Calcium Carbonates2017In: Minerals, ISSN 2075-163X, E-ISSN 2075-163X, Vol. 7, no 7, article id 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amine-CO2 chemistry is important for a range of different chemical processes, including carbon dioxide capture. Here, we studied how aspects of this chemistry could be used to prepare calcium carbonates. Chemically crosslinked organogels were first prepared by reacting hyperbranched polyethylene imine (PEI) dissolved in DMSO with carbon dioxide. The crosslinks of the organogel consisted of ammonium-carbamate ion pairs as was shown by IR spectroscopy. These carbamate-rich organogels were subsequently subjected to aqueous solutions of calcium acetate, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precipitated. The ACC did not crystalize during the mixing for up to 20 h, as was shown by a combination of IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and thermal analysis. Some PEI had been included or adsorbed on the ACC particles. Traces of calcite were observed in one sample that had been subjected to water in a work-up procedure.

  • 43.
    Bacsik, Zoltán
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Adsorption of Carbonyl Sulfide on Propylamine Tethered to Porous Silica2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 26, p. 7708-7713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) reacts slowly with amines in the aqueous solutions used to absorb CO2 from natural gas and flue gas and can also deactivate certain aqueous amines. The effects of COS on amines tethered to porous silica, however, have not been investigated before. Hence, the adsorption of COS on aminopropyl groups tethered to porous silica was studied using in situ IR spectroscopy. COS chemisorbed mainly and reversibly as propylammonium propylthiocarbamate ion pairs [R-NH(C= O)S- +H3N-R] under dry conditions. In addition, a small amount of another chemisorbed species formed slowly and irreversibly. Nevertheless, the CO2 capacities of the adsorbents were fully retained after COS was desorbed.

  • 44. Bahrami, Fariba
    et al.
    Zarroug, Moundheur
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Lundberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Analysis of a thermosyphon using a Mandelstam condition2016In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Engineering and Computational Mechanics, ISSN 1755-0777, E-ISSN 1755-0785, Vol. 169, no 1, p. 29-39, article id 1500011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characteristics of a thermally forced connected-vessel thermosyphon operating in an oscillatory mode have been determined using analytical techniques, the outcome of which is compared with results obtained by numerical integration of the governing equations. From a previous investigation it was known that adequate phase-plane representations of the limit cycles associated with oscillations could be obtained if the vessel-volume ratio was sufficiently small. This study aims at demonstrating how this constraint on the vessel volumes can be relaxed by prescribing a Mandelstam condition, that is, by postulating that the total heat content of the system remains conserved during the rapid phases of the oscillation. It was concluded that incorporating this Mandelstam condition in the analysis had the highly beneficial consequence that good analytical results could be obtained for much larger values of the vessel-volume ratio than those previously permitted.

  • 45. Bajwa, Anjali
    et al.
    Moraga, Francisca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Balakrishnan, Malini
    Svensson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Batra, Vidya S.
    Activated Carbon Monoliths by Pressureless Technique for Environmental Applications2015In: Environmental Progress & Sustainable Energy, ISSN 1944-7442, E-ISSN 1944-7450, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1420-1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon monoliths have been prepared through simple procedure by carbonization in inert atmosphere at 550 C from commercial activated carbon and from unburned carbon in it ykste bctgasse fly asb; US nig, In 0 different kin dS phenolic resin binders. The bagasse fly ash was collected ft on; sugar mills where bagasse is used as a biomass based fuel for cogeneration. Commercial actuated carbon based monoliths whet -e 5 and 10 wt % of the actuated carbon had been replaced by iron oxide (hematite) were dic0 prepared. Results indicate that BET sutfac:e area decreases upon carbonization and loading of hematite. Scanning electron microscopy studies shows that the iron oxide is well distributed over the monoliths and X-ray diffraction shows that it is reduced to magnetite during carbonization. Temperature programmed reduction eAperintents show that the iron oxides on the monoliths are redox active. The monoliths based on commercial activated carbon show 80% remotwl of phenol in dihtted phenol based water solutions whereas unburned carbon derived monoliths showed 5-/ % removal in similar solution.

  • 46. Bannan, Thomas J.
    et al.
    Booth, A. Murray
    Jones, Benjamin T.
    O'Meara, Simon
    Barley, Mark H.
    Riipinen, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Percival, Carl J.
    Topping, David
    Measured Saturation Vapor Pressures of Phenolic and Nitro-aromatic Compounds2017In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 3922-3928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenolic and nitro-aromatic compounds are extremely toxic components of atmospheric aerosol that are currently not well understood. In this Article, solid and subcooled-liquid-state saturation vapor pressures of phenolic and nitro-aromatic compounds are measured using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS) over a range of temperatures (298-318 K). Vapor pressure estimation methods, assessed in this study, do not replicate the observed dependency on the relative positions of functional groups. With a few exceptions, the estimates are biased toward predicting saturation vapor pressures that are too high, by 5-6 orders of magnitude in some cases. Basic partitioning theory comparisons indicate that overestimation of vapor pressures in such cases would cause us to expect these compounds to be present in the gas state, whereas measurements in this study suggest these phenolic and nitro-aromatic will partition into the condensed state for a wide range of ambient conditions if absorptive partitioning plays a dominant role. While these techniques might have both structural and parametric uncertainties, the new data presented here should support studies trying to ascertain the role of nitrogen containing organics on aerosol growth and human health impacts.

  • 47. Barbeiro, A. R.
    et al.
    Ureba, Ana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Universidad de Sevilla, Spain; Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla, IBIS, Spain; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Baeza, J. A.
    Linares, R.
    Perucha, M.
    Jimenez-Ortega, E.
    Velazquez, S.
    Mateos, J. C.
    Leal, A.
    3D VMAT Verification Based on Monte Carlo Log File Simulation with Experimental Feedback from Film Dosimetry2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0166767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model based on a specific phantom, called QuAArC, has been designed for the evaluation of planning and verification systems of complex radiotherapy treatments, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). This model uses the high accuracy provided by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of log files and allows the experimental feedback from the high spatial resolution of films hosted in QuAArC. This cylindrical phantom was specifically designed to host films rolled at different radial distances able to take into account the entrance fluence and the 3D dose distribution. Ionization chamber measurements are also included in the feedback process for absolute dose considerations. In this way, automated MC simulation of treatment log files is implemented to calculate the actual delivery geometries, while the monitor units are experimentally adjusted to reconstruct the dose-volume histogram (DVH) on the patient CT. Prostate and head and neck clinical cases, previously planned with Monaco and Pinnacle treatment planning systems and verified with two different commercial systems (Delta4 and COMPASS), were selected in order to test operational feasibility of the proposed model. The proper operation of the feedback procedure was proved through the achieved high agreement between reconstructed dose distributions and the film measurements (global gamma passing rates > 90% for the 2%/2 mm criteria). The necessary discretization level of the log file for dose calculation and the potential mismatching between calculated control points and detection grid in the verification process were discussed. Besides the effect of dose calculation accuracy of the analytic algorithm implemented in treatment planning systems for a dynamic technique, it was discussed the importance of the detection density level and its location in VMAT specific phantom to obtain a more reliable DVH in the patient CT. The proposed model also showed enough robustness and efficiency to be considered as a pre-treatment VMAT verification system.

  • 48.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Two sides of the same coin: How enzymes distort substrates and vice versa. An infrared spectroscopic view on pyruvate kinase and Ca2+-ATPase2016In: Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging, ISSN 2212-8794, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 101-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review summarises our infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies on the mutual interactions between enzymes and their substrates. We investigated phosphoenolpyruvate bound to pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40, M1 isozyme), ATP bound to the Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA1a), and the aspartylphosphate moiety of the Ca2+-ATPase phosphoenzyme E2P. Conformational changes of the enzymes and distortions of substrate structure are discussed. In all cases, the infrared absorption of the substrate in the enzyme environment could be identified by a combination of reaction-induced difference spectroscopy and isotopic labelling. The experimentally-determined vibrational frequencies were interpreted in structural terms using experimental correlations or modelling of the active site in density functional theory calculations. For none of the three systems, a weakening of the bond that is cleaved in the following enzymatic reaction could be detected in the ground state of the enzyme-substrate complex. However, for the dephosphorylation reaction of the Ca2+-ATPase phosphoenzyme E2P, a high energy intermediate, not detected in experiments, is the reactant state according to density functional theory calculations.

  • 49. Battistin, Claudia
    et al.
    Hertz, John
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark.
    Tyrcha, Joanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Roudi, Yasser
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience/Centre for Neural Computation, Norway.
    Belief propagation and replicas for inference and learning in a kinetic Ising model with hidden spins2015In: Journal of Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Experiment, ISSN 1742-5468, E-ISSN 1742-5468, article id P05021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new algorithm for inferring the state of hidden spins and reconstructing the connections in a synchronous kinetic Ising model, given the observed history. Focusing on the case in which the hidden spins are conditionally independent of each other given the state of observable spins, we show that calculating the likelihood of the data can be simplified by introducing a set of replicated auxiliary spins. Belief propagation (BP) and susceptibility propagation (SusP) can then be used to infer the states of hidden variables and to learn the couplings. We study the convergence and performance of this algorithm for networks with both Gaussian-distributed and binary bonds. We also study how the algorithm behaves as the fraction of hidden nodes and the amount of data are changed, showing that it outperforms the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) equations for reconstructing the connections.

  • 50. Battiston, S.
    et al.
    Boldrini, S.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Famengo, A.
    Fiameni, S.
    Toprak, M. S.
    Fabrizio, M.
    Influence of Al and Mg Addition on Thermoelectric Properties of Higher Manganese Silicides Obtained by Reactive Sintering2017In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1668-1673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS), represented by MnSix (x = 1.71-1.75), are promising p-type candidates for thermoelectric (TE) energy harvesting systems at intermediate temperature range. The materials are very attractive as they may replace lead based compounds due to their nontoxicity, low cost of starting materials, and high thermal and chemical stability. Dense pellets were obtained through fast reactive sintering by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The addition -or nanoinclusion, of Al and Mg permitted the figure of merit enhancement of the material obtained with this technique, reaching the highest value of 0.40 at 600 degrees C. Morphology, composition and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by electron microscopies, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses, respectively.

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