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  • 1.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Backchannels and breathing
  • 2. Abbasi, R.
    et al.
    Deoskar, Kunal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hidvegi, Attila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jansson, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zhelnin, P.
    D-Egg: a dual PMT optical module for IceCube2023In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 18, no 4, article id P04014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The D-Egg, an acronym for Dual optical sensors in an Ellipsoid Glass for Gen2, is one of the optical modules designed for future extensions of the IceCube experiment at the South Pole. The D-Egg has an elongated-sphere shape to maximize the photon-sensitive effective area while maintaining a narrow diameter to reduce the cost and the time needed for drilling of the deployment holes in the glacial ice for the optical modules at depths up to 2700 m. The D-Egg design is utilized for the IceCube Upgrade, the next stage of the IceCube project also known as IceCube-Gen2 Phase 1, where nearly half of the optical sensors to be deployed are D-Eggs. With two 8-inch high-quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) per module, D-Eggs offer an increased effective area while retaining the successful design of the IceCube digital optical module (DOM). The convolution of the wavelength-dependent effective area and the Cherenkov emission spectrum provides an effective photodetection sensitivity that is 2.8 times larger than that of IceCube DOMs. The signal of each of the two PMTs is digitized using ultra-low-power 14-bit analog-to-digital converters with a sampling frequency of 240 MSPS, enabling a flexible event triggering, as well as seamless and lossless event recording of single-photon signals to multi-photons exceeding 200 photoelectrons within 10 ns. Mass production of D-Eggs has been completed, with 277 out of the 310 D-Eggs produced to be used in the IceCube Upgrade. In this paper, we report the design of the D-Eggs, as well as the sensitivity and the single to multi-photon detection performance of mass-produced D-Eggs measured in a laboratory using the built-in data acquisition system in each D-Egg optical sensor module.

  • 3.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Carney, Rebecca M. D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS inner detector are described in this paper for different data-taking conditions in proton-proton, proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected during the first period of LHC operation (Run 1) and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with two different gas mixtures (xenon-based and argon-based) and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. These studies show that the tracking performance of the TRT is similar for the two gas mixtures and that a significant contribution to the particle momentum resolution is made by the TRT up to high particle densities.

  • 4.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    A measurement of material in the ATLAS tracker using secondary hadronic interactions in 7 TeV p p collisions2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the material in the ATLAS inner tracking detector is crucial in under-standing the reconstruction of charged-particle tracks, the performance of algorithms that identify jets containing b-hadrons and is also essential to reduce background in searches for exotic particles that can decay within the inner detector volume. Interactions of primary hadrons produced in pp collisions with the material in the inner detector are used to map the location and amount of this material. The hadronic interactions of primary particles may result in secondary vertices, which in this analysis are reconstructed by an inclusive vertex-finding algorithm. Data were collected using minimum-bias triggers by the ATLAS detector operating at the LHC during 2010 at centre-of-mass energy root s = 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19 nb(-1). Kinematic properties of these secondary vertices are used to study the validity of the modelling of hadronic interactions in simulation. Secondary-vertex yields are compared between data and simulation over a volume of about 0.7m(3) around the interaction point, and agreement is found within overall uncertainties.

  • 5. Affatati, Alice
    et al.
    Scaini, Chiara
    Scaini, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bolin Centre for Climate Research (together with KTH & SMHI).
    The role of operators in sustainable whale-watching tourism: Proposing a continuous training framework2024In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 1, article id e0296241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whale watching is considered a form of green tourism, but can affect marine ecosystems, impacting cetaceans’ behavior and potentially increasing acoustic pollution. A more sustainable whale-watching practice should employ a comprehensive approach involving all stakeholders, but whale-watching operators are rarely involved. We propose a method to assess whale–watching operators’ perceptions regarding the possible effects of their activity on marine fauna and preferred mitigation solutions, by means of online questionnaires and website communication strategies. Results from Canadian whale-watching operators show that they observe regulations regarding distance to whales but only partially perceive general vessels’ impacts on fauna. Three recognized whale-watching experts identify the need for continuous training targeted at operators, which should include the impacts on marine ecosystems. A continuous training framework is proposed that targets whale-watching operators in addition to tourists, and involves scientists in several steps of the approach. This study serves as a starting point to involve operators’ in order to advance towards a sustainable whale-watching tourism.

  • 6.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Deoskar, Kunal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    O'Sullivan, Erin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Computational techniques for the analysis of small signals in high-statistics neutrino oscillation experiments2020In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 977, article id 164332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current and upcoming generation of Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes - collecting unprecedented quantities of neutrino events - can be used to explore subtle effects in oscillation physics, such as (but not restricted to) the neutrino mass ordering. The sensitivity of an experiment to these effects can be estimated from Monte Carlo simulations. With the high number of events that will be collected, there is a trade-off between the computational expense of running such simulations and the inherent statistical uncertainty in the determined values. In such a scenario, it becomes impractical to produce and use adequately-sized sets of simulated events with traditional methods, such as Monte Carlo weighting. In this work we present a staged approach to the generation of expected distributions of observables in order to overcome these challenges. By combining multiple integration and smoothing techniques which address limited statistics from simulation it arrives at reliable analysis results using modest computational resources.

  • 7.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dumm, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wolf, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, U.S.A..
    Very high-energy gamma-ray follow-up program using neutrino triggers from IceCube2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe and report the status of a neutrino-triggered program in IceCube that generates real-time alerts for gamma-ray follow-up observations by atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS). While IceCube is capable of monitoring the whole sky continuously, high-energy gamma-ray telescopes have restricted fields of view and in general are unlikely to be observing a potential neutrino-flaring source at the time such neutrinos are recorded. The use of neutrino-triggered alerts thus aims at increasing the availability of simultaneous multi-messenger data during potential neutrino flaring activity, which can increase the discovery potential and constrain the phenomenological interpretation of the high-energy emission of selected source classes (e. g. blazars). The requirements of a fast and stable online analysis of potential neutrino signals and its operation are presented, along with first results of the program operating between 14 March 2012 and 31 December 2015.

  • 8. Akmete, A.
    et al.
    Alexandrov, A.
    Anokhina, A.
    Aoki, S.
    Atkin, E.
    Azorskiy, N.
    Back, J. J.
    Bagulya, A.
    Baranov, A.
    Barker, G. J.
    Bay, A.
    Bayliss, V.
    Bencivenni, G.
    Berdnikov, A. Y.
    Berdnikov, Y. A.
    Bertani, M.
    Betancourt, C.
    Bezshyiko, I.
    Bezshyyko, O.
    Bick, D.
    Bieschke, S.
    Blanco, A.
    Boehm, J.
    Bogomilov, M.
    Bondarenko, K.
    Bonivento, W. M.
    Boyarsky, A.
    Brenner, R.
    Breton, D.
    Brundler, R.
    Bruschi, M.
    Buscher, V.
    Buonaura, A.
    Buontempo, S.
    Cadeddu, S.
    Calcaterra, A.
    Campanelli, M.
    Chauveau, J.
    Chepurnov, A.
    Chernyavsky, M.
    Choi, K. -Y.
    Chumakov, A.
    Ciambrone, P.
    Dallavalle, G. M.
    D'Ambrosio, N.
    D'Appollonio, G.
    De Lellis, G.
    De Roeck, A.
    De Serio, M.
    Dedenko, L.
    Di Crescenzo, A.
    Di Marco, N.
    Dib, C.
    Dijkstra, H.
    Dmitrenko, V.
    Domenici, D.
    Donskov, S.
    Dubreuil, A.
    Ebert, J.
    Enik, T.
    Etenko, A.
    Fabbri, F.
    Fabbri, L.
    Fedin, O.
    Fedorova, G.
    Felici, G.
    Ferro-Luzzi, M.
    Fini, R. A.
    Fonte, P.
    Franco, C.
    Fukuda, T.
    Galati, G.
    Gavrilov, G.
    Gerlach, S.
    Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.
    Golubkov, D.
    Golutvin, A.
    Gorbunov, D.
    Gorbunov, S.
    Gorkavenko, V.
    Gornushkin, Y.
    Gorshenkov, M.
    Grachev, V.
    Graverini, E.
    Grichine, V.
    Guler, A. M.
    Guz, Yu.
    Hagner, C.
    Hakobyan, H.
    van Herwijnen, E.
    Hollnagel, A.
    Hosseini, B.
    Hushchyn, M.
    Iaselli, G.
    Iuliano, A.
    Jacobsson, R.
    Jonker, M.
    Kadenko, I.
    Kamiscioglu, C.
    Kamiscioglu, M.
    Khabibullin, M.
    Khaustov, G.
    Khotyantsev, A.
    Kim, S. H.
    Kim, V.
    Kim, Y. G.
    Kitagawa, N.
    Ko, J. -W.
    Kodama, K.
    Kolesnikov, A.
    Kolev, D. I.
    Kolosov, V.
    Komatsu, M.
    Konovalova, N.
    Korkmaz, M. A.
    Korol, I.
    Korol'ko, I.
    Korzenev, A.
    Kovalenko, S.
    Krasilnikova, I.
    Krivova, K.
    Kudenko, Y.
    Kurochka, V.
    Kuznetsova, E.
    Lacker, H. M.
    Lai, A.
    Lanfranchi, G.
    Lantwin, O.
    Lauria, A.
    Lebbolo, H.
    Lee, K. Y.
    Levy, J. -M.
    Lopes, L.
    Lyubovitskij, V.
    Maalmi, J.
    Magnan, A.
    Maleev, V.
    Malinin, A.
    Mefodev, A.
    Mermod, P.
    Mikado, S.
    Mikhaylov, Yu.
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mineev, O.
    Montanari, A.
    Montesi, M. C.
    Morishima, K.
    Movchan, S.
    Naganawa, N.
    Nakamura, M.
    Nakano, T.
    Novikov, A.
    Obinyakov, B.
    Ogawa, S.
    Okateva, N.
    Owen, P. H.
    Paoloni, A.
    Park, B. D.
    Paparella, L.
    Pastore, A.
    Patel, M.
    Pereyma, D.
    Petrenko, D.
    Petridis, K.
    Podgrudkov, D.
    Poliakov, V.
    Polukhina, N.
    Prokudin, M.
    Prota, A.
    Rademakers, A.
    Ratnikov, F.
    Rawlings, T.
    Razeti, M.
    Redi, F.
    Ricciardi, S.
    Roganova, T.
    Rogozhnikov, A.
    Rokujo, H.
    Rosa, G.
    Rovelli, T.
    Ruchayskiy, O.
    Ruf, T.
    Samoylenko, V.
    Saputi, A.
    Sato, O.
    Savchenko, E. S.
    Schmidt-Parzefall, W.
    Serra, N.
    Shakin, A.
    Shaposhnikov, M.
    Shatalov, P.
    Shchedrina, T.
    Shchutska, L.
    Shevchenko, V.
    Shibuya, H.
    Shustov, A.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simone, S.
    Skorokhvatov, M.
    Smirnov, S.
    Sohn, J. Y.
    Sokolenko, A.
    Starkov, N.
    Storaci, B.
    Strolin, P.
    Takahashi, S.
    Timiryasov, I.
    Tioukov, V.
    Tosi, N.
    Treille, D.
    Tsenov, R.
    Ulin, S.
    Ustyuzhanin, A.
    Uteshev, Z.
    Vankova-Kirilova, G.
    Vannucci, F.
    Venkova, P.
    Vilchinski, S.
    Villa, M.
    Vlasik, K.
    Volkov, A.
    Voronkov, R.
    Wanke, R.
    Woo, J. -K.
    Wurm, M.
    Xella, S.
    Yilmaz, D.
    Yilmazer, A. U.
    Yoon, C. S.
    Zaytsev, Yu.
    The active muon shield in the SHiP experiment2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SHiP experiment is designed to search for very weakly interacting particles beyond the Standard Model which are produced in a 400 GeV/c proton beam dump at the CERN SPS. An essential task for the experiment is to keep the Standard Model background level to less than 0.1 event after 2 x 10(20) protons on target. In the beam dump, around 10(11) muons will be produced per second. The muon rate in the spectrometer has to be reduced by at least four orders of magnitude to avoid muon-induced combinatorial background. A novel active muon shield is used to magnetically deflect the muons out of the acceptance of the spectrometer. This paper describes the basic principle of such a shield, its optimization and its performance.

  • 9.
    Ali, Hasan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sathyanath, Sharath Kumar Manjeshwar
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Rusz, Jan
    Uusimaki, Toni
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin
    Thersleff, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Leifer, Klaus
    Single scan STEM-EMCD in 3-beam orientation using a quadruple aperture2023In: Ultramicroscopy, ISSN 0304-3991, E-ISSN 1879-2723, Vol. 251, article id 113760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to acquire multiple angle-resolved electron energy loss spectra (EELS) is one of the several critical challenges associated with electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) experiments. If the experiments are performed by scanning a nanometer to atomic-sized electron probe on a specific region of a sample, the precision of the local magnetic information extracted from such data highly depends on the accuracy of the spatial registration between multiple scans. For an EMCD experiment in a 3-beam orientation, this means that the same specimen area must be scanned four times while keeping all the experimental conditions same. This is a non-trivial task as there is a high chance of morphological and chemical modification as well as non-systematic local orientation variations of the crystal between the different scans due to beam damage, contamination and spatial drift. In this work, we employ a custom-made quadruple aperture to acquire the four EELS spectra needed for the EMCD analysis in a single electron beam scan, thus removing the above-mentioned complexities. We demonstrate a quantitative EMCD result for a beam convergence angle corresponding to sub-nm probe size and compare the EMCD results for different detector geometries.

  • 10. Aminlashgari, Nina
    et al.
    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Ilag, Leopold L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    Nanocomposites as novel surfaces for laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry2011In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to utilize nanocomposite films as easy-to-handle surfaces for surface assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) of small molecules, such as pharmaceutical compounds, was evaluated. The signal-to-noise values of acebutolol, propranolol and carbamazepine obtained on the nanocomposite surfaces were higher than the values obtained on plain PLA surface showing that the nanoparticles participate in the ionization/desorption process even when they are immobilized in the polymer matrix. The advantages of nanocomposite films compared to the free nanoparticles used in earlier studies are the ease of handling and reduction of instrument contamination since the particles are immobilized into the polymer matrix. Eight inorganic nanoparticles, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, montmorillonite nanoclay, halloysite nanoclay, silicon nitride and graphitized carbon black at different concentrations were solution casted to films with polylactide (PLA). There were large differences in signal intensities depending on the type of drug, type of nanoparticle and the concentration of nanoparticles. Polylactide with 10% titanium oxide or 10% silicon nitride functioned best as SALDI-MS surfaces. The limit of detection (LOD) for the study was ranging from 1.7 ppm up to 56.3 ppm and the signal to noise relative standard deviations for the surface containing 10% silicon nitride was approximately 20-30%. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated in most cases a good distribution of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix and contact angle measurements showed increasing hydrophobicity when the nanoparticle concentration was increased, which could influence the desorption and ionization. Overall, the results show that nanocomposite films have potential as surfaces for SALDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  • 11.
    Andrean, Stefio Y.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Backman, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Barranco Navarro, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kastanas, Alexandros
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Nelson, Michael E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pasuwan, Patrawan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pereira Sanchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdés Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Performance of the upgraded PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger2020In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 15, no 11, article id P11016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger prepares the analogue trigger signals sent from the ATLAS calorimeters by digitising, synchronising, and calibrating them to reconstruct transverse energy deposits, which are then used in further processing to identify event features. During the first long shutdown of the LHC from 2013 to 2014, the central components of the PreProcessor, the Multichip Modules, were replaced by upgraded versions that feature modern ADC and FPGA technology to ensure optimal performance in the high pile-up environment of LHC Run 2. This paper describes the features of the new Multichip Modules along with the improvements to the signal processing achieved.

  • 12.
    Andrean, Stefio Y.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Backman, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Barranco Navarro, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Dunne, Katherine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ingebretsen Carlson, Tom
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lou, Xuanhong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pasuwan, Patrawan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pereira Sanchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strübig, Antonia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdés Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Operation and performance of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker in LHC Run 22022In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 17, no 1, article id P01013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The semiconductor tracker (SCT) is one of the tracking systems for charged particles in the ATLAS detector. It consists of 4088 silicon strip sensor modules. During Run 2 (2015-2018) the Large Hadron Collider delivered an integrated luminosity of 156 fb(-1) to the ATLAS experiment at a centre-of-mass proton-proton collision energy of 13 TeV. The instantaneous luminosity and pile-up conditions were far in excess of those assumed in the original design of the SCT detector. Due to improvements to the data acquisition system, the SCT operated stably throughout Run 2. It was available for 99.9% of the integrated luminosity and achieved a data-quality efficiency of 99.85%. Detailed studies have been made of the leakage current in SCT modules and the evolution of the full depletion voltage, which are used to study the impact of radiation damage to the modules. '

  • 13. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Persson, Tomas
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    Romero, Mario
    ter Vehn, Pontus
    Supporting after action review in simulator mission training: Co-creating visualization concepts for training of fast-jet fighter pilots2019In: The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, ISSN 1548-5129, E-ISSN 1557-380X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 219-231Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the design and evaluation of visualization concepts supporting After Action Review (AAR) in simulator mission training of fast-jet fighter pilots. The visualization concepts were designed based on three key characteristics of representations: re-representation, graphical constraining, and computational offloading. The visualization concepts represent combined parameters of missile launch and threat range, the former meant to elicit discussions about the prerequisites for launching missiles, and the latter to present details of what threats a certain aircraft is facing at a specific moment. The visualization concepts were designed to: 1) perceptually and cognitively offload mental workload from participants in support of determining relevant situations to discuss; 2) re-represent parameters in a format that facilitates reading-off of crucial information; and 3) graphically constrain plausible interpretations. Through a series of workshop iterations, two visualization concepts were developed and evaluated with 11 pilots and instructors. All pilots were unanimous in their opinion that the visualization concepts should be implemented as part of the AAR. Offloading, in terms of finding interesting events in the dynamic and unique training sessions, was the most important guiding concept, while re-representation and graphical constraining enabled a more structured and grounded collaboration during the AAR.

  • 14.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) X-ray Astronomy Satellite2018In: Journal of Astronomical Telescopes Instruments and Systems, ISSN 2329-4124, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 021402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission is the sixth Japanese x-ray astronomy satellite developed by a large international collaboration, including Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe. The mission aimed to provide the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E > 2 keV, using a microcalorimeter instrument, and to cover a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft x-rays to gamma rays. After a successful launch on February 17, 2016, the spacecraft lost its function on March 26, 2016, but the commissioning phase for about a month provided valuable information on the onboard instruments and the spacecraft system, including astrophysical results obtained from first light observations. The paper describes the Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission, its capabilities, the initial operation, and the instruments/spacecraft performances confirmed during the commissioning operations for about a month.

  • 15. Babbar-Sebens, Meghna
    et al.
    Root, Elizabeth
    Rosenberg, David E.
    Watkins, David
    Mirchi, Ali
    Giacomoni, Marcio
    Madani, Kaveh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
    Training Water Resources Systems Engineers to Communicate: Acting on Observations from On-the-Job Practitioners2019In: Journal of professional issues in engineering education and practice, ISSN 1052-3928, E-ISSN 1943-5541, Vol. 145, no 4, article id 04019012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineers face the ongoing challenge to effectively communicate for diverse purposes and audiences across multiple settings. The authors interviewed 10 practicing water resources systems engineers to collect their lived experiences of the use of water resources systems analysis in their workplaces. Thematic analysis was used to identify three key communications hurdles practitioners face: stakeholder influence over the communication process, engineers as central to communication and decision making, and communication as an opportunity to educate stakeholders and engineers. Practitioners recommended classroom activities to overcome these hurdles and better integrate communications training into curricula. Recommendations include (1) expanding the use of case studies, (2) adding opportunities for role plays and team activities, (3) providing students with more practice on how to hold effective discussions, facilitate teamwork, and resolve conflicts, and (4) providing students with the broader contexts for class problems, including how political/institutional constraints, bureaucracies, and social issues may constrain communication and technical solutions. This study shares 22 example activities as online educational resources in a free, open, searchable repository and shows how activities can serve as a bottom-up approach to integrate communications training into the engineering curriculum.

  • 16.
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Effects of carbon dioxide captured from ambient air on the infrared spectra of supported amines2016In: Vibrational Spectroscopy, ISSN 0924-2031, E-ISSN 1873-3697, Vol. 87, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino groups in highly dense coatings of amines on solid supports react with CO2 of ambient air and form ammonium-carbamate ion pairs. These ion pairs change the properties of the amine-modified supports. In numerous studies, the corresponding infrared (IR) spectra have been misinterpreted. The presumption has been that such ion pairs would not form in ambient air, and therefore IR bands have been assigned to moieties of the support and the amines. Here, we discuss common misunderstandings of the IR spectra of amine-modified supports and highlight that proper sample handling is necessary before employing different characterization techniques. We exemplify by performing an IR spectroscopic study of a propylamine-modified porous silica. Such amine-modified supports are relevant to applications in gas separation, catalysis, controlled drug delivery and adsorption of pollutants from water.

  • 17. Bodnar, Olha
    et al.
    Bodnar, Taras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Bayesian estimation in multivariate inter-laboratory studies with unknown covariance matrices2023In: Metrologia, ISSN 0026-1394, E-ISSN 1681-7575, Vol. 60, no 5, article id 054003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the paper we present Bayesian inference procedures for the parameters of multivariate random effects model, which is used as a quantitative tool for performing multivariate key comparisons and multivariate inter-laboratory studies. The developed new approach does not require that the reported covariance matrices of participating laboratories are known and, as such, it can be used when they are estimated from the measurement results. The Bayesian inference procedures are based on samples generated from the derived posterior distribution when the Berger and Bernardo reference prior and the Jeffreys prior are assigned to the model parameter. Three numerical algorithms for the construction of Markov chains are provided and implemented in the CCAUV.V-K1 key comparisons. All three approaches yield similar Bayesian estimators with wider credible intervals when the Berger and Bernardo reference prior is used. Also, the Bayesian estimators for the elements of the inter-laboratory covariance matrix are larger under this prior than for the Jeffreys prior. Finally, the constructed joint credible sets for the components of the overall mean vector indicate the presence of linear dependence between them which cannot be captured when only univariate key comparisons are performed.

  • 18. Boman, Johan
    et al.
    Langer, M.
    Pei, X.
    Guo, S.
    Pathak, R. K.
    Gaita, Samuel Mwaniki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science.
    Hu, M.
    Hallquist, M.
    PM2.5 at a semi-rural site near Beijing, China2023In: X-Ray Spectrometry, ISSN 0049-8246, E-ISSN 1097-4539, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breathing clean air is a human right still not accessible to everyone. In most of the world, the air is polluted, which affects both the environment and human health. To investigate the air pollution situation in a semi-rural part of northern China, particles with a diameter below 2.5 & mu;m (PM2.5) were collected in Changping, 40 km northwest of Beijing in May and June 2016. The particles were analyzed for mass, trace elements, and black carbon (BC). The mean PM2.5 mass was 49 & mu;g/m(3), ranging from 3.1 to 266 & mu;g/m(3). S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Pb were determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). They constituted 4% of the PM2.5 mass, with BC adding another 3%. Enrichment factor evaluation identified S, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Pb as the main anthropogenic contributors to environmental impact. A pollution load index (PLI) of 0.03 showed that the site could not be considered as polluted by the trace elements in PM2.5. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used for source apportionment of the PM2.5 content. The PMF analysis reveals that a mixture of mineral dust, fossil fuel combustion, industries, and salts were the main sources of air pollution. The non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks were assessed, and both show a small health risk in the short study period. Following the development of PM2.5 concentrations over time in this part of China shows a decreasing trend of PM2.5 pollution, which is promising for the future.

  • 19.
    De Alwis, Sulakshana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Abertay University, School of Business, Law and Social Sciences, Division of Accounting.
    Technology-Assisted Supplemental Work in Sri Lanka: The Role of Information Communication Technologies in Work-life Boundaries and Work-life Conflict2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to increased affordability and accessibility, information and communication technologies (ICTs) are omnipresent in the daily lives of many individuals and consequently influence how people think, feel, and react in day-to-day life experiences. Workplaces are increasingly becoming less bounded by place and time, and employees can connect with work anywhere, anytime. The limitless connectivity enabled by ICTs has created paradoxical experiences for employees. On the one hand, connectivity increases flexibility, empowering employees to work whenever they prefer and wherever they want to be. On the other hand, connectivity creates after-hours expectations where employees are expected to be available anytime to work (i.e. Technology-Assisted Supplemental Work - TASW). However, ICTs alone cannot create these paradoxical experiences, and it is the constitutive entanglements between ICTs, social, organisational and individual factors that create paradoxical experiences. Employing the sociomaterial perspective, in this thesis, we looked at how ICTs have become entangled with different social, organisational, and individual factors in the work-life boundary experiences of individuals and how these entanglements contribute to Technology-Assisted Supplemental Work (TASW) and the work-life conflict of employees. 

    The findings showed that TASW and work-life boundary experiences are outcomes of complex web relations between different sociomaterial assemblages. The flexibility availability paradox is an outcome of these constitutive entanglements between ICTs and human factors. Hence, the same technological constellations could create different boundary experiences for individuals due to the specific nature of the entanglements. Cultural values such as collectivism and power distance could elevate after-hours expectations if top management support such work norms. The findings also showed that female employees can be further disadvantaged due to TASW, especially if they are from a society that upholds traditional gender norms. In such circumstances, introducing technology as a facilitator of work-life balance through flexibility is questionable. All in all, the entanglement of ICTs with social, cultural and individual factors can decide the work-life conflict of employees. These findings suggest that the role of technology needs to be conceptualised carefully in work-life research. Assuming technology to be an exogenous factor or completely absent from work-life experiences will not give a complete picture of the work-life experiences of individuals. Thus, looking at work-life experiences from the sociomaterial perspective would assist researchers in finding more richer insights about this phenomenon and such new insights would be beneficial for organisations to implement formal guidelines to manage TASW requirements to reduce the negative consequences of TASW. 

     

     

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  • 20. Dong, Junfeng
    et al.
    Wu, Desheng Dash
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Two-period pricing and quick response with strategic customers2019In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 215, p. 165-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the impact of the strategic customer behavior in two-period pricing and the inventory decisions in a quick response system. A model with a differentiated value period of product is developed when customers are strategic and heterogeneous. Interestingly, the unique equilibrium is proven to exist if and only if the degree of customer strategic behavior is sufficiently high. Otherwise, the dynamic pricing strategy in one selling season is not a suitable choice for a firm. Moreover, the impact of strategic consumers on pricing and inventory strategies is investigated in the case where the clientele's taste for product value follows a uniform distribution. Surprisingly, contrary to previous studies, we found that strategic consumers may yield more revenues in specific scenarios. An extended analysis on Beta distribution is also presented, showing that there is greater chance to obtain the highest profit in the supply chain when all customers are strategic and if more people prefer low-value products.

  • 21.
    Edén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Al-27 NMR Studies of Aluminosilicate Glasses2015In: Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy / [ed] Webb, GA, San Diego: Elsevier, 2015, Vol. 86, p. 237-331Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aluminosilicate glasses are of great geological and technological importance. Significant efforts have been spent for enhancing the insight into their structures, where magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR that exploits the spin-5/2 27Al as probe nucleus constitutes one widely utilized option. We review the application of basic 27Al NMR experimentation for studying primarily the short-range (less than or similar to 0.3 nm) structure of aluminosilicate glasses, emphasizing practical aspects of performing MAS and triple-quantum MAS NMR experiments, as well as options for data analysis to extract 27Al NMR parameters and quantifying AlOp populations. We illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of routine 27Al NMR for investigating aluminosilicate glasses, including its development over time. While parts of the text apply generally to MAS NMR targeting half-integer spins as structural probes in crystalline as well as amorphous materials, the focus remains on 27Al NMR applications to aluminosilicate glasses, whose basic structural features are outlined together with a survey of the most central research problems in the field. By providing both in-depth discussions about the building blocks of aluminosilicate glasses while assuming a modest background knowledge of the reader about MAS NMR and glass structure, we hope that the presentation will appeal to a broad audience, encompassing both experienced researchers in solid-state NMR or glass structures, as well as to beginners in either area.

  • 22.
    Ewels, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Sikora, Thierry
    Serin, Virginie
    Ewels, Chris P.
    Lajaunie, Luc
    A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu2016In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 717-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  • 23.
    Falowska-Pietrzak, Olga
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bassler, Niels
    Hedqvist, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hellberg, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wolff-Fabris, Frederik
    Investigation of the stray radiation origin and composition at the European XFEL undulators with gafchromic films measurements and Geant4 simulations2023In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 1056, article id 168672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At EuXFEL, a stray field of ionizing radiation is present near undulator magnets which eventually can lead to their demagnetization and decreased efficiency of the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) process. In this work we investigate both the origin and composition of the radiation field at the undulator magnets with gafchromic film measurements and Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Both measurements and simulations suggest that the radiation field in the upstream undulator cells comes from high-energy electrons striking the beam pipe. In addition, horizontal dose distributions at the entrance of the undulator segments depend on where the electrons hit the beam pipe. Geant4 simulations show that the radiation fluence near magnets is dominated by photons, while charged secondary electrons and positrons contribute almost entirely to the ionizing dose absorbed by magnets.

  • 24.
    Garrote Jurado, Ramon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Ramon.Garrote@hb.se.
    Educational Software in Engineering Education2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes to the quality of engineering education and the accessibility of education worldwide by promoting computer-enhanced teaching and learning. It uses the epistemology of John Dewey (1859-1952) and the action research methodology first advanced by Kurt Lewin (1890-1947). A mixed methods approach that combines qualitative case studies with quantitative research methods is used.

    In the first of three case studies engineering students working on their final degree projects participated. To elicit interaction, a learning management system (LMS) was used and the students were strongly encouraged to discuss various aspects of their work.

    The second case focused on the barriers to a wider utilization of educational software in engineering education. The case is delimited to lecturers at the School of Engineering at the University of Borås. The investigation focuses on the lecturers’ reluctance to use educational technology and the slow uptake of new pedagogical methods in engineering education.

    The third case study covers three subsets of participants. A course intended to improve lecturers handling skills and motivation to utilize educational software in a pedagogically sound manner was given in Cuba, Guatemala and Peru.

    The first case demonstrated that computer-enhanced collaborative learning can improve the learning experience and performance of engineering students. The second case showed that LMS tools that facilitate traditional methods are used routinely, whereas lecturers often refrain from using features intended to facilitate collaboration and the creation of communities of learners.

    The third case study investigated the use of a complete course package, with all course material and software contained on the same USB drive (LiveUSB Mediated Education, LUME). It is asserted that LUME can facilitate constructivist pedagogical methods and help overcome the reluctance of lecturers to utilize educational software in a pedagogical sound way.

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  • 25. Ghignone, Stefano
    et al.
    Prencipe, Mauro
    Manzotti, Paola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bruno, Marco
    Boero, Federica
    Borghini, Alessia
    Costa, Emanuele
    Ciriotti, Marco
    Scaramuzzo, Emanuele
    The Raman spectrum of florencite-(REE) [REEAl3(PO4)2(OH)6]: An integrated experimental and computational approach2024In: Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, ISSN 0377-0486, E-ISSN 1097-4555, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 394-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Florencite is a hydrous light rare-earth elements (LREE) aluminium phosphate [REEAl3(PO4)2(OH)6], that amongst the REE-rich minerals is quite common. The main end-members are Ce-, La- and Nd-rich terms that were found in several genetic environments. Despite the large occurrence worldwide, to the authors' knowledge, florencite has attracted very few studies, particularly concerning the characterization of its Raman spectrum. We present a detailed study of the Raman spectrum of florencite, combining experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Experimental Raman spectra (in the 100–1300 cm−1 spectral range) are measured on four florencite samples characterized by different chemical composition, that is, different REE abundance. The results highlight a remarkable coincidence between different Raman spectra measured on each sample, despite the significantly different chemical compositions in terms of their REE content. The same similarities were also observed in the computed spectra at the ab initio level; moreover, the calculations allowed the attributions of the different Raman signals to specific vibrational modes. 

  • 26.
    Glarou, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Denmark.
    Zrust, Martina
    Svendsen, Jon C.
    Using Artificial-Reef Knowledge to Enhance the Ecological Function of Offshore Wind Turbine Foundations: Implications for Fish Abundance and Diversity2020In: Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, E-ISSN 2077-1312, Vol. 8, no 5, article id 332Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the development of large-scale offshore wind farms (OWFs) amplifies due to technological progress and a growing demand for renewable energy, associated footprints on the seabed are becoming increasingly common within soft-bottom environments. A large part of the footprint is the scour protection, often consisting of rocks that are positioned on the seabed to prevent erosion. As such, scour protection may resemble a marine rocky reef and could have important ecosystem functions. While acknowledging that OWFs disrupt the marine environment, the aim of this systematic review was to examine the effects of scour protection on fish assemblages, relate them to the effects of designated artificial reefs (ARs) and, ultimately, reveal how future scour protection may be tailored to support abundance and diversity of marine species. The results revealed frequent increases in abundances of species associated with hard substrata after the establishment of artificial structures (i.e., both OWFs and ARs) in the marine environment. Literature indicated that scour protection meets the requirements to function as an AR, often providing shelter, nursery, reproduction, and/or feeding opportunities. Using knowledge from AR models, this review suggests methodology for ecological improvements of future scour protections, aiming towards a more successful integration into the marine environment.

  • 27. Grasse, Patricia
    et al.
    Brzezinski, Mark A.
    Cardinal, Damien
    de Souza, Gregory F.
    Andersson, Per
    Closset, Ivia
    Cao, Zhimian
    Dai, Minhan
    Ehlert, Claudia
    Estrade, Nicolas
    Francois, Roger
    Frank, Martin
    Jiang, Guibin
    Jones, Janice L.
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Liu, Qian
    Lu, Dawei
    Pahnke, Katharina
    Ponzevera, Emanuel
    Schmitt, Melanie
    Sun, Xiaole
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sutton, Jill N.
    Thil, Francois
    Weis, Dominique
    Wetzel, Florian
    Zhang, Anyu
    Zhang, Jing
    Zhang, Zhouling
    GEOTRACES inter-calibration of the stable silicon isotope composition of dissolved silicic acid in seawater2017In: Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, ISSN 0267-9477, E-ISSN 1364-5544, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 562-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first inter-calibration study of the stable silicon isotope composition of dissolved silicic acid in seawater, delta Si-30(OH)(4), is presented as a contribution to the international GEOTRACES program. Eleven laboratories from seven countries analyzed two seawater samples from the North Pacific subtropical gyre (Station ALOHA) collected at 300 m and at 1000 m water depth. Sampling depths were chosen to obtain samples with a relatively low (9 mmol L-1, 300 m) and a relatively high (113 mmol L-1, 1000 m) silicic acid concentration as sample preparation differs for low- and highconcentration samples. Data for the 1000 m water sample were not normally distributed so the median is used to represent the central tendency for the two samples. Median delta Si-30(OH)(4) values of +1.66& for the low-concentration sample and +1.25& for the high-concentration sample were obtained. Agreement among laboratories is overall considered very good; however, small but statistically significant differences among the mean isotope values obtained by different laboratories were detected, likely reflecting inter-laboratory differences in chemical preparation including pre-concentration and purification methods together with different volumes of seawater analyzed, and the use of different mass spectrometers including the Neptune MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Fisher (TM), Germany), the Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS (Nu Instruments (TM), Wrexham, UK), and the Finnigan (TM) (now Thermo Fisher (TM), Germany) MAT 252 IRMS. Future studies analyzing delta Si-30(OH)(4) in seawater should also analyze and report values for these same two reference waters in order to facilitate comparison of data generated among and within laboratories over time.

  • 28. Große, Christine
    et al.
    Larsson, Aron
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Björkqvist, Olof
    Information-flawing filters in critical infrastructure protection: the deficient information basis in a Swedish approach2023In: International Journal of Critical Infrastructures, ISSN 1475-3219, E-ISSN 1741-8038, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 40-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various societal functions, such as healthcare, freight transports, water supplies and electricity, ensure the daily life, endurance and progress of modern societies. The protection of such critical functions requires comprehensive information processing. Based on evidence from documents on the Swedish planning process STYREL and interviews with entrusted decision-makers at county administrative boards, municipalities and power grid operators, this study aims to crystallise information pathways and flaws to highlight information filtration and alteration. Analyses of the material reveal a set of information-flawing filters, such as information withholding or loss when sharing, information scarcity in criticality assessments and ad-hoc information creation due to scarcity. Because of these filters, the Swedish process causes an altering of information that affects the quality of decisions and the emergency response plan that relies on them. Thus, this study indicates deficiencies that relate to information sharing, information security and decision-making that poses risks to citizens and businesses.

  • 29.
    Gustafsson, Jimmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Digitalisering och lärande i teknikundervisning ur ett elevperspektiv: Ett undervisningsförsök i årskurs 7-92018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Digitaliseringen i samhället påverkar alla medborgare och skolan är inget undantag. Digitala verktyg finns överallt i elevernas vardag och även i klassrummen. Det ställer krav på lärarna som måste ta hänsyn till såväl elevernas förkunskaper och förväntningar på digitalisering i undervisningen som samhällets och beslutsfattarnas förväntningar. Den här studien utgår från ett elevperspektiv på hur fysisk modellering uppfattas jämfört med digital modellering i teknikundervisning på högstadiet hos en grupp elever med diagnoser inom autismspektrat och därmed i behov av särskilt stöd. Ett undervisningsförsök genomförs där eleverna delas upp i två grupper under två lektioner. Den ena gruppen får börja med fysisk modellering och den andra gruppen med digital modellering första lektionen. Lektionen därefter får båda grupperna arbeta med både fysisk och digital modellering. Det visar sig i undervisningsförsöket att elever som börjar med digital modellering är mindre nyanserade och kritiska i sina omdömen om det digitala verktyget än elever som börjar med fysisk modellering. Vidare visar det sig att elevernas intresse och lärande inte påverkas om de arbetar med digitala modeller eller fysiska modeller första lektionen utan uppgifternas förmåga att stimulera elevernas kreativitet väger tyngre. Samtidigt väljer samtliga elever att arbeta med digitala verktyg när de får möjlighet att välja, även elever som gav negativa omdömen om det digitala verktyget. Det visar på vikten av att läraren har en didaktisk plan för vad digitala verktyg ska användas till, hur de ska användas och varför så att det inte bara blir något som slentrianmässigt används i undervisningen eftersom eleverna då riskerar att gå miste om variation och möjligheter till olika arbetssätt och fördjupning i undervisningen.

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  • 30. Heidenreich, N.
    et al.
    Rütt, U.
    Köppen, M.
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Beier, S.
    Dippel, A. -C.
    Suren, R.
    Stock, N.
    A multi-purpose reaction cell for the investigation of reactions under solvothermal conditions2017In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 88, no 10, article id 104102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new versatile and easy-to-use remote-controlled reactor setup aimed at the analysis of chemical reactions under solvothermal conditions has been constructed. The reactor includes a heating system that can precisely control the temperature inside the reaction vessels in a range between ambient temperature and 180 degrees C. As reaction vessels, two sizes of commercially available borosilicate vessels (V-max = 5 and 11 ml) can be used. The setup furthermore includes the option of stirring and injecting of up to two liquid additives or one solid during the reaction to initiate very fast reactions, quench reactions, or alter chemical parameters. In addition to a detailed description of the general setup and its functionality, three examples of studies conducted using this setup are presented.

  • 31. Henningsson, Marcus
    et al.
    Östergren, Karin
    Sundberg, Rolf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Dejmek, Petr
    Sensor fusion a a tool to monitor dynamic dairy processes2006In: Journal of Food Engineering, ISSN 0260-8774, E-ISSN 1873-5770, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 154-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system for monitoring milk and fat concentration in a dynamic milk/water system by fusing information from several sensors was investigated. Standard instrumentation for food production was used, the sensors were a conductivity meter, a density meter and an optical instrument used to measure backscattered light. The system was applied to a dynamic mixing situation. Prediction error did not exceed 2% in the milk concentration and 0.1% fat in the total fat concentration. The applicability of the sensor fusion approach in field conditions was demonstrated by mounting the sensors in a dairy plant and monitoring the start-up of a pasteurizer. 

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    Henningsson et al sensor fusion.pdf
  • 32.
    Hettithanthri, Upeksha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. NSBM Green University, Sri Lanka.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Munasinghe, Harsha
    George Brown College, Canada.
    Exploring the Collaborative Design Process at Conventional Design Studio2022In: Innovative Technologies and Learning: 5th International Conference, ICITL 2022, Virtual Event, August 29–31, 2022, Proceedings / [ed] Yueh-Min Huang; Shu-Chen Cheng; João Barroso; Frode Eika Sandnes, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 218-230Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative engagement and collaborative practice are key components in Architectural design practice. The design studio motivates collaboration, but it may have some limitations. The technology and use of digital devices have encroached on architectural design education and have made many productive moves. This study aims at understanding how digital devices and technology could impact collaborative learning utilized in architectural pedagogy. This study was carried out in a conventional design studio context with the involvement of 40 Interior design undergraduates. Interior design students were selected based on the convenience sampling methodology and they were clustered into 8 collaborative groups. They were assigned a design task and 12 studio hours were allocated to collect data. Data collection was done by naturalistic observation carried out by the researcher and interviews were conducted to get the reflections of students. The data was analyzed through six phased Thematic analyses based on Grounded Theory. The study resulted in the impacts generated by the technology and digital devices on the design process of interior design students. The results depict that overexposure to technology and digital devices have made students individual-centric while being in a collaborative group. Moreover, it made students less empathetic towards user requirements. Further being device-centric made students less empathized with the user and the context and it has impacted the design process by avoiding some key initial steps which are necessary to get more functional human-centric solutions.

  • 33. Hnaien, Faicel
    et al.
    Dolgui, Alexandre
    Wu, Desheng Dash
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Single-period inventory model for one-level assembly system with stochastic lead times and demand2016In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 186-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Replenishment planning of an assembly system with one type of finished product assembled from diverse external suppliers to satisfy finished product demand. It is supposed that the component lead times and finished product demand are random discrete variables. The assembly company must determine what are the best quantities of components and when is the right time to order. The objective is to minimise the total cost which is composed of holding component costs, tardiness penalties, lost sales and surplus item costs for finished products. A single-period analytical model is proposed. Several properties of the objective function are proven. They are used to develop a Branch and Bound algorithm. Numerical tests for the algorithm are presented. Five heuristics based on Newsvendor model for lead time and demand are proposed and compared with the Branch and Bound algorithm. These tests show that the suggested Branch and Bound algorithm can solve large size problems within a short time. The proposed heuristics but one are not competitive with the Branch and Bound algorithm. The truncated version of Branch and Bound gives better results. The model suggested is better adapted to actual contract assembler environments, more realistic and can better approximate real-life industrial situations. The proposed exact algorithm provides optimal solutions for all discrete distributions of probabilities of lead times and demand. A new general approach to design such discrete optimisation algorithms is presented.

  • 34.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designing for added pedagogical value: A design-based research study of teachers’ educational design with ICT2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an increasingly digitized world teachers are expected to take on the role of educational designers and use ICT to design in ways that add pedagogical value to teaching and learning. This thesis adopts a design-based research (DBR) approach to: (a) explore and contribute to the educational design processes of teachers of English as a foreign language in their efforts to use ICT for added pedagogical value, (b) examine how ICT is used in educational designs to create/contribute to what the teachers and students describe as added value and (c) explore, problematize and refine DBR as a research approach.

    Literature studies and a collaborative self-study preceded the DBR to guide its focus and implementation. The DBR was carried out over a period of two years in four upper secondary schools in Sweden in which every student had access to their own computer. The research data consists of: (a) audio recorded design conversations, (b) enacted educational designs and design elements as parts of these, (c) reflective log entries written by the participating teachers, (d) focus group interviews with students and (e) the researcher’s field notes.

    Six different theoretical frameworks and models are used in combination in the accompanying articles to analyze the data and achieve the three research aims. The findings show how teachers’ pedagogical reasoning and TPACK development are interconnected and reciprocal aspects of the educational design process and how the externalization of, and reflection on, these aspects is necessary to develop the specific and practical TPACK needed to realize design intentions in situated contexts. A number of challenges and opportunities in the educational process have been identified.

    Moreover, the findings show how ICT was used to contribute added value in educational designs by facilitating: (a) more authentic and seamless learning experiences in external online contexts with both in-class and out-of-class actors irrespective of time and place, (b) an exchange of digital knowledge representations of understanding and practice between different actors, e.g. for the purposes of modelling, supporting cognitive apprenticeship, meta-cognitive self-regulation and formative assessment and (c) new and extended forms of, and opportunities for, collaborative creation and meaning-making.

    The current common focus in DBR on the development of prescriptive design principles is problematized in relation to the findings of the thesis, which illustrate the complex and situated nature of the educational design process. A theoretically and empirically informed design framework (DF) is developed and used as a conceptual tool to guide and analyze educational design processes and enactments. The findings illustrate how the use of the DF and the process of collaborative design reflection contributed to the analysis of the teachers’ design intentions and de facto design practices and to a DBR format that allowed the participants to use their respective competencies in the development of educational designs for added value. The thesis thereby serves as an example of how DBR can be methodically implemented to study and generate increased knowledge about teachers’ design intentions and design practices, develop research-based educational designs in line with teachers’ pedagogical intentions and support their development as educational designers.

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  • 35.
    Högås, Marcus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Rydler, Karl-Erik
    Stenarson, Jörgen
    Yhland, Klas
    Analytic Solution of the Magnetic Field and Inductance in a Coaxial Short Circuit2015In: IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, ISSN 0018-9456, E-ISSN 1557-9662, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 1582-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the analytic solution of the magnetic field and the inductance in a coaxial short circuit is derived from Maxwell's equations with the appropriate boundary conditions on the short circuit. Helmholtz equation is thus derived for the magnetic field and is solved by a mode matching technique. By integrating the absolute square of the magnetic field the inductance is obtained. The solution is discussed in the light of earlier approximations and solutions and is evaluated both theoretically and through measurements.

  • 36. Ivanov, Mikhail F.
    et al.
    Kiverin, Alexey D.
    Liberman, Mikhail A.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Ignition of deflagration and detonation ahead of the flame due to radiative preheating of suspended micro particles2015In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 162, no 10, p. 3612-3621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study a flame propagating in the gaseous combustible mixture with suspended inert solid micro particles. The gaseous mixture is assumed to be transparent for thermal radiation emitted by the hot combustion products, while particles absorb and reemit the radiation. Thermal radiation heats the particles, which in turn transfer the heat to the surrounding unburned gaseous mixture by means of thermal heat transfer, so that the gas phase temperature lags that of the particles. We consider different scenarios depending on the spatial distribution of the particles, their size and the number density. In the case of uniform spatial distribution of the particles the radiation causes a modest increase of the temperature ahead of the flame and corresponding modest increase of the combustion velocity. In the case of non-uniform distribution of the particles (layered dust cloud), such that the particles number density is relatively small in the region just ahead of the flame front and increases in the distant regions ahead of the flame, the preheating caused by the thermal radiation may trigger additional independent source of ignition. Far ahead of the flame, where number density of particles increases forming a dense cloud of particles, the radiative preheating results in the formation of a temperature gradient with the maximum temperature sufficient for ignition. Depending on the steepness of the temperature gradient formed in the unburned mixture, either deflagration or detonation can be initiated via the Zel'dovich's gradient mechanism. The ignition and the resulting combustion regimes depend on the number density profile and, correspondingly, on the temperature profile (temperature gradient), which is formed in effect of radiation absorption and gas-dynamic expansion. The effect of radiation preheating as stronger as smaller is the normal flame velocity. The effect of radiation heat transfer in the case of coal dust flames propagating in layered particle-gas deposits cloud can result in the spread of combustion wave with velocity up to 1000 m/s and it is a plausible explanation of the origin of dust explosion in coal mines.

  • 37.
    Iyer, Nirmal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kiss, M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pearce, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stana, T. -A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Awaki, H.
    Bose, R. G.
    Dasgupta, A.
    De Geronimo, G.
    Gau, E.
    Hakamata, T.
    Ishida, M.
    Ishiwata, K.
    Kamogawa, W.
    Kislat, F.
    Kitaguchi, T.
    Krawczynski, H.
    Lisalda, L.
    Maeda, Y.
    Matsumoto, H.
    Miyamoto, A.
    Miyazawa, T.
    Mizuno, T.
    Rauch, B. F.
    Cavero, N. Rodriguez
    Sakamoto, N.
    Sato, J.
    Spooner, S.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takeo, M.
    Tamagawa, T.
    Uchida, Y.
    West, A. T.
    Wimalasena, K.
    Yoshimoto, M.
    The design and performance of the XL-Calibur anticoincidence shield2023In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 1048, article id 167975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The XL-Calibur balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimetry mission comprises a Compton-scattering polarimeter placed at the focal point of an X-ray mirror. The polarimeter is housed within a BGO anticoincidence shield, which is needed to mitigate the considerable background radiation present at the observation altitude of -40 km. This paper details the design, construction and testing of the anticoincidence shield, as well as the performance measured during the week-long maiden flight from Esrange Space Centre to the Canadian Northwest Territories in July 2022. The in-flight performance of the shield followed design expectations, with a veto threshold <100 keV and a measured background rate of -0.5 Hz (20-40 keV). This is compatible with the scientific goals of the mission, where %-level minimum detectable polarisation is sought for a Hz-level source rate.

  • 38.
    Jaber, Razan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Towards Designing Better Speech Agent Interaction: Using Eye Gaze for Interaction2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research is about addressing the need to better understand interaction with conversational user interfaces (CUIs) and how human-technology `conversations' can be improved by drawing on the lessons learned from human-human interaction. It focuses on incorporating abstractions of complex human behaviour, specifically gaze, to enhance interactions with speech agents in conversations. Across four empirical studies, a mix of methods is used to look closely at the interaction between the user and the system.

    I offer empirical and conceptual contributions for interaction designers and researchers. First, I present a novel speech interface, Tama, which is a gaze-aware speech agent designed to explore the use of gaze in conversational interactions with smart speakers. Second, I present the empirical contributions, that is, the studies that document the interactions with and around speech interfaces, including ongoing, non-system-directed speech. A moment-by-moment analysis of these interactions highlights the opportunities that the gaze offers as a modality to enhance the interaction with the speech agent, as well as the problems and limitations when such a modality is used. The third contribution is a conceptual contribution made by providing perspective on minimal anthropomorphic design. This produces interactions that are not human-like in terms of behaviour but do take advantage of the skills used in human interaction as a key to advancing interactions with speech agents.

    Based on my research work and contributions, I reflect upon advancing interactions with speech interfaces, focusing on what different technologies can offer and the possibility of taking the next step in designing CUIs. I then discuss the need to bridge the work of different fields (i.e. conversation analysis (CA), human-computer interaction (HCI), and human-robot interaction (HRI)) to combine models and approaches from all these fields in order to guide designers building speech systems. I see three competing yet complementary interaction paradigms across CUIs. I call these paradigms Direct Speech Interaction, Agent-Mediated Interaction, and Para-Speech Interaction. Each of these paradigms has specific challenges and opportunities for interaction. 

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    Towards Designing Better Speech Agent Interaction
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  • 39.
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids and gases2015In: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: A Specialist Periodical Report / [ed] K. Kamienska Trela, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015, Vol. 44, p. 235-293Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The review covers the progress in the field of NMR relaxation in fluids during the period from June 2013 through May 2014. The emphasis is on comparatively simple liquids and solutions of physico-chemical and chemical interest, in analogy with the previous periods, but selected biophysics-related topics and relaxation-related work on more complex systems (macromolecular solutions, liquid crystalline systems, glassy and porous materials) are also covered. The first part of the chapter is concerned with general, physical and experimental aspects of nuclear spin relaxation, while the second part is concentrated on applications.

  • 40. Larue, Grégoire S.
    et al.
    Filtness, Ashleigh J.
    Wood, Joanne M.
    Demmel, Sébastien
    Watling, Christopher N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Naweed, Anjum
    Rakotonirainy, Andry
    Is it safe to cross? Identification of trains and their approach speed at level crossings2018In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 103, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving the safety at passive rail crossings is an ongoing issue worldwide. These crossings have no active warning systems to assist drivers' decision-making and are completely reliant on the road user perceiving the approach of a train to decide whether to enter a crossing or not. This study aimed to better understand drivers' judgements regarding approaching trains and their perceptions of safe crossing. Thirty-six participants completed a field-based protocol that involved detecting and judging the speeds of fast moving trains. They were asked to report when they first detected an approaching train, when they could first perceive it as moving, as well as providing speed estimates and a decision regarding when it would not be safe to cross. Participants detected the trains similar to 2 km away and were able to perceive the trains as moving when they were 1.6 km away. Large differences were observed between participants but all could detect trains within the range of the longest sighting distances required at passive level crossings. Most participants greatly underestimated travelling speed by at least 30%, despite reporting high levels of confidence in their estimates. Further, most participants would have entered the crossing at a time when the lights would have been activated if the level crossing had been protected by flashing lights. These results suggest that the underestimation of high-speed trains could have significant safety implications for road users' crossing behaviour, particularly as it reduces the amount of time and the safety margins that the driver has to cross the rail crossing.

  • 41. Li, Haipeng
    et al.
    Dumont, Elodie
    Slipets, Roman
    Thersleff, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Boisen, Anja
    Sotiriou, Georgios A.
    Democratizing robust SERS nano-sensors for food safety diagnostics2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 470, article id 144023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pesticide residues in food products cause human health concerns through food contamination, thereby necessitating their rapid and facile detection. Although surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique can rapidly and reliably detect pesticide residues, its application in food safety diagnostics is restricted by its high expense, low scalability, and low reproducibility of the necessary sensors. Herein, we present a low-cost, large-scale, and highly reproducible nanofabrication route for SERS nano-sensors, based on the thermophoresis-assisted direct deposition of plasmonic core–shell structured Ag-SiO2 nanoparticles produced in the gas phase, on temperature-controlled inexpensive glass substrates. The high-performance SERS substrates were fabricated at a laboratory production rate of 100 samples/hour, demonstrating the scalability and cost-effectiveness of our aerosol manufacturing strategy. Our highly sensitive SERS substrates rapidly and quantitatively detected pesticide residues in fresh orange, indicating their practical applicability for food safety diagnostics.

  • 42. Lundborg, Magnus
    et al.
    Wennberg, Christian
    Lidmar, Jack
    Hess, Berk
    Lindahl, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Norlén, Lars
    Skin permeability prediction with MD simulation sampling spatial and alchemical reaction coordinates2022In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 121, no 20, p. 3837-3849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A molecular-level understanding of skin permeation may rationalize and streamline product development, and improve quality and control, of transdermal and topical drug delivery systems. It may also facilitate toxicity and safety assessment of cosmetics and skin care products. Here, we present new molecular dynamics simulation approaches that make it possible to efficiently sample the free energy and local diffusion coefficient across the skin’s barrier structure to predict skin permeability and the effects of chemical penetration enhancers. In particular, we introduce a new approach to use two-dimensional reaction coordinates in the accelerated weight histogram method, where we combine sampling along spatial coordinates with an alchemical perturbation virtual coordinate. We present predicted properties for 20 permeants, and demonstrate how our approach improves correlation with ex vivo/in vitro skin permeation data. For the compounds included in this study, the obtained log KPexp-calc mean square difference was 0.9 cm2 h−2.

  • 43.
    Luo, Cuicui
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wu, Desheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wu, Dexiang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    A deep learning approach for credit scoring using credit default swaps2017In: Engineering applications of artificial intelligence, ISSN 0952-1976, E-ISSN 1873-6769, Vol. 65, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After 2007-2008 crisis, it is clear that corporate credit scoring is becoming a key role in credit risk management. In this paper, we investigate the performances of credit scoring models applied to CDS data sets. The classification performance of deep learning algorithm such as deep belief networks with Restricted Boltzmann Machines are evaluated and compared with some popular credit scoring models such as logistic regression, multi-layer perceptron and support vector machine. The performance is assessed using the classification accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. It is found that DBN yields the best performance.

  • 44.
    Milstead, David A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    The experimental facility for the Search for Hidden Particles at the CERN SPS2019In: Journal of Instrumentation, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 14, article id P03025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Search for Hidden Particles (SHiP) Collaboration has shown that the CERN SPS accelerator with its 400 GeV/c proton beam offers a unique opportunity to explore the Hidden Sector [1-3]. The proposed experiment is an intensity frontier experiment which is capable of searching for hidden particles through both visible decays and through scattering signatures from recoil of electrons or nuclei. The high-intensity experimental facility developed by the SHiP Collaboration is based on a number of key features and developments which provide the possibility of probing a large part of the parameter space for a wide range of models with light long-lived super-weakly interacting particles with masses up to O(10) GeV/c(2) in an environment of extremely clean background conditions. This paper describes the proposal for the experimental facility together with the most important feasibility studies. The paper focuses on the challenging new ideas behind the beam extraction and beam delivery, the proton beam dump, and the suppression of beam-induced background.

  • 45. Mink, Janos
    et al.
    Lin, Yuan-Chih
    Karlsson, Maths
    Österberg, Carin
    Udovic, Terrence J.
    Fahlquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Häussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vibrational properties of -KSiH3 and -RbSiH3: a combined Raman and inelastic neutron scattering study2017In: Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, ISSN 0377-0486, E-ISSN 1097-4555, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 284-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrogen storage materials ASiH(3) (A=K and Rb) represent complex metal hydrides built from metal cations and pyramidal SiH3- ions. At room temperature, SiH3- moieties are randomly oriented because of dynamical disorder (-modifications). At temperatures below 200K, ASiH(3) exist as ordered low-temperature () modifications. The vibrational properties of -ASiH(3) were characterized by a combination of Raman spectroscopy and inelastic neutron scattering. Internal modes of SiH3- are observed in the spectral range 1800-1900cm(-1) (stretching modes) and 890-1000cm(-1) (bending modes). External modes are observed below 500cm(-1). Specifically, SiH3- librations are between 300-450cm(-1) and 270-400cm(-1) for A=K and Rb, respectively, SiH3- translations are between 95 and 160cm(-1), K+ translations are in the range 60-100cm(-1) and Rb+ translations in the range 50-70cm(-1). The red-shift of libration modes for A=Rb is associated with a 15-30% reduction of the libration force constants of SiH3- ions in -RbSiH3. This correlates with a lower temperature for the - order-disorder phase transition (278 vs 298K). Libration modes become significantly anharmonic with increasing temperature but are maintained up to at least 200K. The vibrational properties of ASiH(3) compare well to those of alkali metal borohydrides ABH(4) (A=Na-Cs).

  • 46. Mink, Janos
    et al.
    Stirling, Andras
    Ojwang, Dickson O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Svensson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mihály, Judith
    Németh, Csaba
    Drees, Markus
    Hajba, Laszlo
    Vibrational properties and bonding analysis of copper hexacyanoferrate complexes in solid state2019In: Applied spectroscopy reviews (Softcover ed.), ISSN 0570-4928, E-ISSN 1520-569X, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 369-424Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrational spectroscopic study of crystalline copper hexacyanoferrate complexes of composition K4Cu6II [Fe-II(CN)(6)](4)nH(2)O (1) and Cu-6(II)[Fe-III(CN)(6)](4)nH(2)O (2) with -Cu-N equivalent to C-Fe- bridging structures have been performed. The cubic Fmm (O-h(5)) unit-cells contain ideally 4 Fe and 4 Cu ions which were calculated by periodic density functional theory (DFT) (using the Gaussian09 C.01 software package) for ideal lattice compositions of K8Cu4II[Fe-II(CN)(6)](4) (1a), K4Cu4II[Fe-III(CN)(6)](4) (2a) and with lattice water molecules KCu4II[Fe-III(CN)(6)](3)6H(2)O (3a). Systematically, non-linear Cu-N equivalent to C structure was fitted with Cu-N equivalent to C bond angles about 155 degrees for complexes 1a, 2a, and 3a. Practically, all optically active internal modes of Fe(CN6)(n-) moieties resulted from factor group analysis as 4A(1g) + 6E(g) + 4F(1g) + 10F(1u) were experimentally observed and assigned. Some low-frequency translatory and librational modes were also interpreted. Vibrational bands were assigned to cis- and trans-Cu(NC)(4)(OH2) complexes which are formed in the lattice holes of both complexes. Vibrational spectra and force constants of a great number of transition metal hexacyano complexes of compositions K-4[M-II(CN)(6)], K-3[M-III(CN)(6)], CsLi2[M-III(CN)(6)] and Prussian blue analogues have been reexamined and recalculated. Internal and external modes of 6 different lattice water species (coordinated, hydrogen bonded, or zeolitic type) have been interpreted for complex 2 using results of periodic DFT calculation of model complex 3a.

  • 47.
    Mocci, Francesca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Combining MD simulations and NMR spectroscopy for molecular insight and methodological synergy: the integrated MD-NMR method2015In: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: A Specialist Periodical Report / [ed] K. Kamienska Trela, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015, Vol. 44, p. 592-616Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations are highly complementary techniques to study molecular structures, interactions and dynamics. MD simulations are currently reaching the millisecond timescales covering a great variety of dynamical processes. Faster computers and new efficient sampling techniques allow calculations of NMR averages for a more reliable comparison with experiment, while new generations of force fields give better and better agreement between simulated and measured quantities. We review in this Chapter studies where close combination of these two techniques is the method itself to obtain the results and draw conclusions on the dynamics of bio, organic and inorganic systems.

  • 48. Montgomery, Matt
    et al.
    Broyd, Tim
    Cornell, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Pearce, Oliver
    Pocock, David
    Young, Kate
    An innovative approach for improving infrastructure resilience2012In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engeneers: Civil Engineering, ISSN 0965-089X, E-ISSN 1751-7672, Vol. 165, no 6, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extreme weather events, such as the UK floods of 2007 and cold snap of 2010-2011, stress the importance of infrastructure systems' resilience for business continuity. The interconnected nature of critical national infrastructure and its component parts places demands on the approach used to deal with its subsequent complexity. Recognition of infrastructure as a complex adaptive system has led to the development of an innovative, systems-based methodology for sustainability assessment in the built environment. The methodology consists of a database of causal interactions which, when combined with a process, allows users to produce causal loop diagrams that identify unanticipated systemic behaviour, communicate risks, share knowledge, and identify systemic intervention points that minimise negative consequences and add value in a project context. The approach is applied to highlight the key characteristics of complex adaptive systems that critical national infrastructure exhibits and show how the technique can be used to increase infrastructure resilience and sustainability.

  • 49.
    Neumann, Felix
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Madaboosi, Narayanan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Hernández-Neuta, Iván
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Salas, Jeanpierre
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Ahlford, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Devyser AB, Sweden.
    Mecea, Vasile
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    QCM mass underestimation in molecular biotechnology: Proximity ligation assay for norovirus detection as a case study2018In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 273, p. 742-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of piezoelectric mass-sensitive devices is based on the shift in resonance frequency that is proportional to the deposited mass. However, this holds true only for small, rigid masses, while it can result in mass underestimation for heavy, non-rigid masses. In this work, we demonstrate this 'missing mass' phenomenon by measurement of high molecular weight biomolecules on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) platform. For this, we present a model bioassay consisting of a sandwich-type proximity ligation assay for the detection of norovirus-like particles, and its real-time build-up on QCM as an experimental evidence. Upon combination with a localized QCM platform, we explain the pronounced slipping effect in multilayer biological systems resulting in energy dissipation and subsequent mass underestimation. This helps in pointing out the limitations of mega-gravity field sensors for molecular diagnostics where absolute quantification of pathogen load becomes indispensable towards biosensing applications.

  • 50. Pfaff, S.
    et al.
    Zhou, J.
    Hejral, U.
    Gustafson, J.
    Shipilin, Mikhail
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Albertin, S.
    Blomberg, S.
    Gutowski, O.
    Dippel, A.
    Lundgren, E.
    Zetterberg, J.
    Combining high-energy X-ray diffraction with Surface Optical Reflectance and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence for operando catalyst surface characterization2019In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 90, no 3, article id 033703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have combined three techniques, High Energy Surface X-Ray Diffraction (HESXRD), Surface Optical Reflectance, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence in an operando study of CO oxidation over a Pd(100) catalyst. We show that these techniques provide useful new insights such as the ability to verify that the finite region being probed by techniques such as HESXRD is representative of the sample surface as a whole. The combination is also suitable to determine when changes in gas composition or surface structure and/or morphology occur and to subsequently correlate them with high temporal resolution. In the study, we confirm previous results which show that the Pd(100) surface reaches high activity before an oxide can be detected. Furthermore, we show that the single crystal catalyst surface does not behave homogeneously, which we attribute to the surface being exposed to inhomogeneous gas conditions in mass transfer limited scenarios.

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