Change search
Refine search result
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

  • 2.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Carney, Rebecca M. D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS inner detector are described in this paper for different data-taking conditions in proton-proton, proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected during the first period of LHC operation (Run 1) and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with two different gas mixtures (xenon-based and argon-based) and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. These studies show that the tracking performance of the TRT is similar for the two gas mixtures and that a significant contribution to the particle momentum resolution is made by the TRT up to high particle densities.

  • 3.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clement, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Heyon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Petridis, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Modelling Z -> tau tau processes in ATLAS with tau-embedded Z -> mu mu data2015In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 10, article id P09018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the concept, technical realisation and validation of a largely data-driven method to model events with Z -> tau tau decays. In Z -> mu mu events selected from proton-proton collision data recorded at root s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012, the Z decay muons are replaced by tau leptons from simulated Z -> tau tau decays at the level of reconstructed tracks and calorimeter cells. The tau lepton kinematics are derived from the kinematics of the original muons. Thus, only the well-understood decays of the Z boson and tau leptons as well as the detector response to the tau decay products are obtained from simulation. All other aspects of the event, such as the Z boson and jet kinematics as well as effects from multiple interactions, are given by the actual data. This so-called tau-embedding method is particularly relevant for Higgs boson searches and analyses in tau tau final states, where Z -> tau tau decays constitute a large irreducible background that cannot be obtained directly from data control samples. In this paper, the relevant concepts are discussed based on the implementation used in the ATLAS Standard Model H -> tau tau analysis of the full datataset recorded during 2011 and 2012.

  • 4.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    A measurement of material in the ATLAS tracker using secondary hadronic interactions in 7 TeV p p collisions2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the material in the ATLAS inner tracking detector is crucial in under-standing the reconstruction of charged-particle tracks, the performance of algorithms that identify jets containing b-hadrons and is also essential to reduce background in searches for exotic particles that can decay within the inner detector volume. Interactions of primary hadrons produced in pp collisions with the material in the inner detector are used to map the location and amount of this material. The hadronic interactions of primary particles may result in secondary vertices, which in this analysis are reconstructed by an inclusive vertex-finding algorithm. Data were collected using minimum-bias triggers by the ATLAS detector operating at the LHC during 2010 at centre-of-mass energy root s = 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19 nb(-1). Kinematic properties of these secondary vertices are used to study the validity of the modelling of hadronic interactions in simulation. Secondary-vertex yields are compared between data and simulation over a volume of about 0.7m(3) around the interaction point, and agreement is found within overall uncertainties.

  • 5.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dumm, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wolf, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, U.S.A..
    Very high-energy gamma-ray follow-up program using neutrino triggers from IceCube2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id P11009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe and report the status of a neutrino-triggered program in IceCube that generates real-time alerts for gamma-ray follow-up observations by atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes (MAGIC and VERITAS). While IceCube is capable of monitoring the whole sky continuously, high-energy gamma-ray telescopes have restricted fields of view and in general are unlikely to be observing a potential neutrino-flaring source at the time such neutrinos are recorded. The use of neutrino-triggered alerts thus aims at increasing the availability of simultaneous multi-messenger data during potential neutrino flaring activity, which can increase the discovery potential and constrain the phenomenological interpretation of the high-energy emission of selected source classes (e. g. blazars). The requirements of a fast and stable online analysis of potential neutrino signals and its operation are presented, along with first results of the program operating between 14 March 2012 and 31 December 2015.

  • 6. Akmete, A.
    et al.
    Alexandrov, A.
    Anokhina, A.
    Aoki, S.
    Atkin, E.
    Azorskiy, N.
    Back, J. J.
    Bagulya, A.
    Baranov, A.
    Barker, G. J.
    Bay, A.
    Bayliss, V.
    Bencivenni, G.
    Berdnikov, A. Y.
    Berdnikov, Y. A.
    Bertani, M.
    Betancourt, C.
    Bezshyiko, I.
    Bezshyyko, O.
    Bick, D.
    Bieschke, S.
    Blanco, A.
    Boehm, J.
    Bogomilov, M.
    Bondarenko, K.
    Bonivento, W. M.
    Boyarsky, A.
    Brenner, R.
    Breton, D.
    Brundler, R.
    Bruschi, M.
    Buscher, V.
    Buonaura, A.
    Buontempo, S.
    Cadeddu, S.
    Calcaterra, A.
    Campanelli, M.
    Chauveau, J.
    Chepurnov, A.
    Chernyavsky, M.
    Choi, K. -Y.
    Chumakov, A.
    Ciambrone, P.
    Dallavalle, G. M.
    D'Ambrosio, N.
    D'Appollonio, G.
    De Lellis, G.
    De Roeck, A.
    De Serio, M.
    Dedenko, L.
    Di Crescenzo, A.
    Di Marco, N.
    Dib, C.
    Dijkstra, H.
    Dmitrenko, V.
    Domenici, D.
    Donskov, S.
    Dubreuil, A.
    Ebert, J.
    Enik, T.
    Etenko, A.
    Fabbri, F.
    Fabbri, L.
    Fedin, O.
    Fedorova, G.
    Felici, G.
    Ferro-Luzzi, M.
    Fini, R. A.
    Fonte, P.
    Franco, C.
    Fukuda, T.
    Galati, G.
    Gavrilov, G.
    Gerlach, S.
    Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.
    Golubkov, D.
    Golutvin, A.
    Gorbunov, D.
    Gorbunov, S.
    Gorkavenko, V.
    Gornushkin, Y.
    Gorshenkov, M.
    Grachev, V.
    Graverini, E.
    Grichine, V.
    Guler, A. M.
    Guz, Yu.
    Hagner, C.
    Hakobyan, H.
    van Herwijnen, E.
    Hollnagel, A.
    Hosseini, B.
    Hushchyn, M.
    Iaselli, G.
    Iuliano, A.
    Jacobsson, R.
    Jonker, M.
    Kadenko, I.
    Kamiscioglu, C.
    Kamiscioglu, M.
    Khabibullin, M.
    Khaustov, G.
    Khotyantsev, A.
    Kim, S. H.
    Kim, V.
    Kim, Y. G.
    Kitagawa, N.
    Ko, J. -W.
    Kodama, K.
    Kolesnikov, A.
    Kolev, D. I.
    Kolosov, V.
    Komatsu, M.
    Konovalova, N.
    Korkmaz, M. A.
    Korol, I.
    Korol'ko, I.
    Korzenev, A.
    Kovalenko, S.
    Krasilnikova, I.
    Krivova, K.
    Kudenko, Y.
    Kurochka, V.
    Kuznetsova, E.
    Lacker, H. M.
    Lai, A.
    Lanfranchi, G.
    Lantwin, O.
    Lauria, A.
    Lebbolo, H.
    Lee, K. Y.
    Levy, J. -M.
    Lopes, L.
    Lyubovitskij, V.
    Maalmi, J.
    Magnan, A.
    Maleev, V.
    Malinin, A.
    Mefodev, A.
    Mermod, P.
    Mikado, S.
    Mikhaylov, Yu.
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mineev, O.
    Montanari, A.
    Montesi, M. C.
    Morishima, K.
    Movchan, S.
    Naganawa, N.
    Nakamura, M.
    Nakano, T.
    Novikov, A.
    Obinyakov, B.
    Ogawa, S.
    Okateva, N.
    Owen, P. H.
    Paoloni, A.
    Park, B. D.
    Paparella, L.
    Pastore, A.
    Patel, M.
    Pereyma, D.
    Petrenko, D.
    Petridis, K.
    Podgrudkov, D.
    Poliakov, V.
    Polukhina, N.
    Prokudin, M.
    Prota, A.
    Rademakers, A.
    Ratnikov, F.
    Rawlings, T.
    Razeti, M.
    Redi, F.
    Ricciardi, S.
    Roganova, T.
    Rogozhnikov, A.
    Rokujo, H.
    Rosa, G.
    Rovelli, T.
    Ruchayskiy, O.
    Ruf, T.
    Samoylenko, V.
    Saputi, A.
    Sato, O.
    Savchenko, E. S.
    Schmidt-Parzefall, W.
    Serra, N.
    Shakin, A.
    Shaposhnikov, M.
    Shatalov, P.
    Shchedrina, T.
    Shchutska, L.
    Shevchenko, V.
    Shibuya, H.
    Shustov, A.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simone, S.
    Skorokhvatov, M.
    Smirnov, S.
    Sohn, J. Y.
    Sokolenko, A.
    Starkov, N.
    Storaci, B.
    Strolin, P.
    Takahashi, S.
    Timiryasov, I.
    Tioukov, V.
    Tosi, N.
    Treille, D.
    Tsenov, R.
    Ulin, S.
    Ustyuzhanin, A.
    Uteshev, Z.
    Vankova-Kirilova, G.
    Vannucci, F.
    Venkova, P.
    Vilchinski, S.
    Villa, M.
    Vlasik, K.
    Volkov, A.
    Voronkov, R.
    Wanke, R.
    Woo, J. -K.
    Wurm, M.
    Xella, S.
    Yilmaz, D.
    Yilmazer, A. U.
    Yoon, C. S.
    Zaytsev, Yu.
    The active muon shield in the SHiP experiment2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P05011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SHiP experiment is designed to search for very weakly interacting particles beyond the Standard Model which are produced in a 400 GeV/c proton beam dump at the CERN SPS. An essential task for the experiment is to keep the Standard Model background level to less than 0.1 event after 2 x 10(20) protons on target. In the beam dump, around 10(11) muons will be produced per second. The muon rate in the spectrometer has to be reduced by at least four orders of magnitude to avoid muon-induced combinatorial background. A novel active muon shield is used to magnetically deflect the muons out of the acceptance of the spectrometer. This paper describes the basic principle of such a shield, its optimization and its performance.

  • 7. Aminlashgari, Nina
    et al.
    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Ilag, Leopold L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    Nanocomposites as novel surfaces for laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry2011In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility to utilize nanocomposite films as easy-to-handle surfaces for surface assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) of small molecules, such as pharmaceutical compounds, was evaluated. The signal-to-noise values of acebutolol, propranolol and carbamazepine obtained on the nanocomposite surfaces were higher than the values obtained on plain PLA surface showing that the nanoparticles participate in the ionization/desorption process even when they are immobilized in the polymer matrix. The advantages of nanocomposite films compared to the free nanoparticles used in earlier studies are the ease of handling and reduction of instrument contamination since the particles are immobilized into the polymer matrix. Eight inorganic nanoparticles, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, montmorillonite nanoclay, halloysite nanoclay, silicon nitride and graphitized carbon black at different concentrations were solution casted to films with polylactide (PLA). There were large differences in signal intensities depending on the type of drug, type of nanoparticle and the concentration of nanoparticles. Polylactide with 10% titanium oxide or 10% silicon nitride functioned best as SALDI-MS surfaces. The limit of detection (LOD) for the study was ranging from 1.7 ppm up to 56.3 ppm and the signal to noise relative standard deviations for the surface containing 10% silicon nitride was approximately 20-30%. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated in most cases a good distribution of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix and contact angle measurements showed increasing hydrophobicity when the nanoparticle concentration was increased, which could influence the desorption and ionization. Overall, the results show that nanocomposite films have potential as surfaces for SALDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  • 8.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) X-ray Astronomy Satellite2018In: Journal of Astronomical Telescopes Instruments and Systems, ISSN 2329-4124, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 021402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission is the sixth Japanese x-ray astronomy satellite developed by a large international collaboration, including Japan, USA, Canada, and Europe. The mission aimed to provide the highest energy resolution ever achieved at E > 2 keV, using a microcalorimeter instrument, and to cover a wide energy range spanning four decades in energy from soft x-rays to gamma rays. After a successful launch on February 17, 2016, the spacecraft lost its function on March 26, 2016, but the commissioning phase for about a month provided valuable information on the onboard instruments and the spacecraft system, including astrophysical results obtained from first light observations. The paper describes the Hitomi (ASTRO-H) mission, its capabilities, the initial operation, and the instruments/spacecraft performances confirmed during the commissioning operations for about a month.

  • 9.
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Effects of carbon dioxide captured from ambient air on the infrared spectra of supported amines2016In: Vibrational Spectroscopy, ISSN 0924-2031, E-ISSN 1873-3697, Vol. 87, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino groups in highly dense coatings of amines on solid supports react with CO2 of ambient air and form ammonium-carbamate ion pairs. These ion pairs change the properties of the amine-modified supports. In numerous studies, the corresponding infrared (IR) spectra have been misinterpreted. The presumption has been that such ion pairs would not form in ambient air, and therefore IR bands have been assigned to moieties of the support and the amines. Here, we discuss common misunderstandings of the IR spectra of amine-modified supports and highlight that proper sample handling is necessary before employing different characterization techniques. We exemplify by performing an IR spectroscopic study of a propylamine-modified porous silica. Such amine-modified supports are relevant to applications in gas separation, catalysis, controlled drug delivery and adsorption of pollutants from water.

  • 10.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Two sides of the same coin: How enzymes distort substrates and vice versa. An infrared spectroscopic view on pyruvate kinase and Ca2+-ATPase2016In: Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging, ISSN 2212-8794, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 101-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review summarises our infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies on the mutual interactions between enzymes and their substrates. We investigated phosphoenolpyruvate bound to pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40, M1 isozyme), ATP bound to the Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA1a), and the aspartylphosphate moiety of the Ca2+-ATPase phosphoenzyme E2P. Conformational changes of the enzymes and distortions of substrate structure are discussed. In all cases, the infrared absorption of the substrate in the enzyme environment could be identified by a combination of reaction-induced difference spectroscopy and isotopic labelling. The experimentally-determined vibrational frequencies were interpreted in structural terms using experimental correlations or modelling of the active site in density functional theory calculations. For none of the three systems, a weakening of the bond that is cleaved in the following enzymatic reaction could be detected in the ground state of the enzyme-substrate complex. However, for the dephosphorylation reaction of the Ca2+-ATPase phosphoenzyme E2P, a high energy intermediate, not detected in experiments, is the reactant state according to density functional theory calculations.

  • 11.
    Chartkunchand, Kiattichart C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Stockett, Mark H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Anderson, Emma K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Eklund, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kristiansson, Moa K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kamińska, Magdalena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Jan Kochanowski University, Poland.
    de Ruette, Nathalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blom, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Björkhage, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Källberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Löfgren, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Reinhed, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rosén, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simonsson, Ansgar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Zettergren, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, Henning T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dianion diagnostics in DESIREE: High-sensitivity detection of C-n(2-) from a sputter ion source2018In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 89, no 3, article id 033112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sputter ion source with a solid graphite target has been used to produce dianions with a focus on carbon cluster dianions, C-n(2-), with n = 7-24. Singly and doubly charged anions from the source were accelerated together to kinetic energies of 10 keV per atomic unit of charge and injected into one of the cryogenic (13 K) ion-beam storage rings of the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring Experiment facility at Stockholm University. Spontaneous decay of internally hot C-n(2-) dianions injected into the ring yielded C-n(2-) anions with kinetic energies of 20 keV, which were counted with a microchannel plate detector. Mass spectra produced by scanning the magnetic field of a 90 degrees analyzing magnet on the ion injection line reflect the production of internally hot C-7(2-) - C-24(2-) dianions with lifetimes in the range of tens of microseconds to milliseconds. In spite of the high sensitivity of this method, no conclusive evidence of C-6(2-) was found while there was a clear C-7(2-) signal with the expected isotopic distribution. This is consistent with earlier experimental studies and with theoretical predictions. An upper limit is deduced for a C-6(2-) signal that is two orders-of-magnitude smaller than that for C-7(2-). In addition, CnO2- and CnCu2- dianions were detected.

  • 12. Creus, W.
    et al.
    Allkofer, Y.
    Amsler, C.
    Ferella, Alfredo D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rochet, J.
    Scotto-Lavina, L.
    Walter, M.
    Scintillation efficiency of liquid argon in low energy neutron-argon scattering2015In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 10, article id P08002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments searching for weak interacting massive particles with noble gases such as liquid argon require very low detection thresholds for nuclear recoils. A determination of the scintillation efficiency is crucial to quantify the response of the detector at low energy. We report the results obtained with a small liquid argon cell using a monoenergetic neutron beam produced by a deuterium-deuterium fusion source. The light yield relative to electrons was measured for six argon recoil energies between 11 and 120 keV at zero electric drift field.

  • 13.
    de Ruette, Nathalie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wolf, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Giacomozzi, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Alexander, John D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gatchell, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Universität Innsbruck, Austria.
    Stockett, Mark H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Haag, Nicole
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Zettergren, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, Henning T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    DESIREE electrospray ion source test bench and setup for collision induced dissociation experiments2018In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 89, no 7, article id 075102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we give a detailed description of an electrospray ion source test bench and a single-pass setup for ion fragmentation studies at the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment infrastructure at Stockholm University. This arrangement allows for collision-induced dissociation experiments at the center-of-mass energies between 10 eV and 1 keV. Charged fragments are analyzed with respect to their kinetic energies (masses) by means of an electrostatic energy analyzer with a wide angular acceptance and adjustable energy resolution.

  • 14.
    Edén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Al-27 NMR Studies of Aluminosilicate Glasses2015In: Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy / [ed] Webb, GA, San Diego: Elsevier, 2015, Vol. 86, p. 237-331Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aluminosilicate glasses are of great geological and technological importance. Significant efforts have been spent for enhancing the insight into their structures, where magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR that exploits the spin-5/2 27Al as probe nucleus constitutes one widely utilized option. We review the application of basic 27Al NMR experimentation for studying primarily the short-range (less than or similar to 0.3 nm) structure of aluminosilicate glasses, emphasizing practical aspects of performing MAS and triple-quantum MAS NMR experiments, as well as options for data analysis to extract 27Al NMR parameters and quantifying AlOp populations. We illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of routine 27Al NMR for investigating aluminosilicate glasses, including its development over time. While parts of the text apply generally to MAS NMR targeting half-integer spins as structural probes in crystalline as well as amorphous materials, the focus remains on 27Al NMR applications to aluminosilicate glasses, whose basic structural features are outlined together with a survey of the most central research problems in the field. By providing both in-depth discussions about the building blocks of aluminosilicate glasses while assuming a modest background knowledge of the reader about MAS NMR and glass structure, we hope that the presentation will appeal to a broad audience, encompassing both experienced researchers in solid-state NMR or glass structures, as well as to beginners in either area.

  • 15.
    Ewels, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Sikora, Thierry
    Serin, Virginie
    Ewels, Chris P.
    Lajaunie, Luc
    A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu2016In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 717-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra.

  • 16.
    Garrote Jurado, Ramon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Ramon.Garrote@hb.se.
    Educational Software in Engineering Education2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes to the quality of engineering education and the accessibility of education worldwide by promoting computer-enhanced teaching and learning. It uses the epistemology of John Dewey (1859-1952) and the action research methodology first advanced by Kurt Lewin (1890-1947). A mixed methods approach that combines qualitative case studies with quantitative research methods is used.

    In the first of three case studies engineering students working on their final degree projects participated. To elicit interaction, a learning management system (LMS) was used and the students were strongly encouraged to discuss various aspects of their work.

    The second case focused on the barriers to a wider utilization of educational software in engineering education. The case is delimited to lecturers at the School of Engineering at the University of Borås. The investigation focuses on the lecturers’ reluctance to use educational technology and the slow uptake of new pedagogical methods in engineering education.

    The third case study covers three subsets of participants. A course intended to improve lecturers handling skills and motivation to utilize educational software in a pedagogically sound manner was given in Cuba, Guatemala and Peru.

    The first case demonstrated that computer-enhanced collaborative learning can improve the learning experience and performance of engineering students. The second case showed that LMS tools that facilitate traditional methods are used routinely, whereas lecturers often refrain from using features intended to facilitate collaboration and the creation of communities of learners.

    The third case study investigated the use of a complete course package, with all course material and software contained on the same USB drive (LiveUSB Mediated Education, LUME). It is asserted that LUME can facilitate constructivist pedagogical methods and help overcome the reluctance of lecturers to utilize educational software in a pedagogical sound way.

  • 17. Grasse, Patricia
    et al.
    Brzezinski, Mark A.
    Cardinal, Damien
    de Souza, Gregory F.
    Andersson, Per
    Closset, Ivia
    Cao, Zhimian
    Dai, Minhan
    Ehlert, Claudia
    Estrade, Nicolas
    Francois, Roger
    Frank, Martin
    Jiang, Guibin
    Jones, Janice L.
    Kooijman, Ellen
    Liu, Qian
    Lu, Dawei
    Pahnke, Katharina
    Ponzevera, Emanuel
    Schmitt, Melanie
    Sun, Xiaole
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sutton, Jill N.
    Thil, Francois
    Weis, Dominique
    Wetzel, Florian
    Zhang, Anyu
    Zhang, Jing
    Zhang, Zhouling
    GEOTRACES inter-calibration of the stable silicon isotope composition of dissolved silicic acid in seawater2017In: Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, ISSN 0267-9477, E-ISSN 1364-5544, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 562-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first inter-calibration study of the stable silicon isotope composition of dissolved silicic acid in seawater, delta Si-30(OH)(4), is presented as a contribution to the international GEOTRACES program. Eleven laboratories from seven countries analyzed two seawater samples from the North Pacific subtropical gyre (Station ALOHA) collected at 300 m and at 1000 m water depth. Sampling depths were chosen to obtain samples with a relatively low (9 mmol L-1, 300 m) and a relatively high (113 mmol L-1, 1000 m) silicic acid concentration as sample preparation differs for low- and highconcentration samples. Data for the 1000 m water sample were not normally distributed so the median is used to represent the central tendency for the two samples. Median delta Si-30(OH)(4) values of +1.66& for the low-concentration sample and +1.25& for the high-concentration sample were obtained. Agreement among laboratories is overall considered very good; however, small but statistically significant differences among the mean isotope values obtained by different laboratories were detected, likely reflecting inter-laboratory differences in chemical preparation including pre-concentration and purification methods together with different volumes of seawater analyzed, and the use of different mass spectrometers including the Neptune MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Fisher (TM), Germany), the Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS (Nu Instruments (TM), Wrexham, UK), and the Finnigan (TM) (now Thermo Fisher (TM), Germany) MAT 252 IRMS. Future studies analyzing delta Si-30(OH)(4) in seawater should also analyze and report values for these same two reference waters in order to facilitate comparison of data generated among and within laboratories over time.

  • 18. Heidenreich, N.
    et al.
    Rütt, U.
    Köppen, M.
    Inge, Andrew Kentaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Beier, S.
    Dippel, A. -C.
    Suren, R.
    Stock, N.
    A multi-purpose reaction cell for the investigation of reactions under solvothermal conditions2017In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 88, no 10, article id 104102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new versatile and easy-to-use remote-controlled reactor setup aimed at the analysis of chemical reactions under solvothermal conditions has been constructed. The reactor includes a heating system that can precisely control the temperature inside the reaction vessels in a range between ambient temperature and 180 degrees C. As reaction vessels, two sizes of commercially available borosilicate vessels (V-max = 5 and 11 ml) can be used. The setup furthermore includes the option of stirring and injecting of up to two liquid additives or one solid during the reaction to initiate very fast reactions, quench reactions, or alter chemical parameters. In addition to a detailed description of the general setup and its functionality, three examples of studies conducted using this setup are presented.

  • 19. Hnaien, Faicel
    et al.
    Dolgui, Alexandre
    Wu, Desheng Dash
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Single-period inventory model for one-level assembly system with stochastic lead times and demand2016In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 186-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Replenishment planning of an assembly system with one type of finished product assembled from diverse external suppliers to satisfy finished product demand. It is supposed that the component lead times and finished product demand are random discrete variables. The assembly company must determine what are the best quantities of components and when is the right time to order. The objective is to minimise the total cost which is composed of holding component costs, tardiness penalties, lost sales and surplus item costs for finished products. A single-period analytical model is proposed. Several properties of the objective function are proven. They are used to develop a Branch and Bound algorithm. Numerical tests for the algorithm are presented. Five heuristics based on Newsvendor model for lead time and demand are proposed and compared with the Branch and Bound algorithm. These tests show that the suggested Branch and Bound algorithm can solve large size problems within a short time. The proposed heuristics but one are not competitive with the Branch and Bound algorithm. The truncated version of Branch and Bound gives better results. The model suggested is better adapted to actual contract assembler environments, more realistic and can better approximate real-life industrial situations. The proposed exact algorithm provides optimal solutions for all discrete distributions of probabilities of lead times and demand. A new general approach to design such discrete optimisation algorithms is presented.

  • 20.
    Högås, Marcus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Rydler, Karl-Erik
    Stenarson, Jörgen
    Yhland, Klas
    Analytic Solution of the Magnetic Field and Inductance in a Coaxial Short Circuit2015In: IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, ISSN 0018-9456, E-ISSN 1557-9662, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 1582-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the analytic solution of the magnetic field and the inductance in a coaxial short circuit is derived from Maxwell's equations with the appropriate boundary conditions on the short circuit. Helmholtz equation is thus derived for the magnetic field and is solved by a mode matching technique. By integrating the absolute square of the magnetic field the inductance is obtained. The solution is discussed in the light of earlier approximations and solutions and is evaluated both theoretically and through measurements.

  • 21. Ivanov, Mikhail F.
    et al.
    Kiverin, Alexey D.
    Liberman, Mikhail A.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Ignition of deflagration and detonation ahead of the flame due to radiative preheating of suspended micro particles2015In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 162, no 10, p. 3612-3621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study a flame propagating in the gaseous combustible mixture with suspended inert solid micro particles. The gaseous mixture is assumed to be transparent for thermal radiation emitted by the hot combustion products, while particles absorb and reemit the radiation. Thermal radiation heats the particles, which in turn transfer the heat to the surrounding unburned gaseous mixture by means of thermal heat transfer, so that the gas phase temperature lags that of the particles. We consider different scenarios depending on the spatial distribution of the particles, their size and the number density. In the case of uniform spatial distribution of the particles the radiation causes a modest increase of the temperature ahead of the flame and corresponding modest increase of the combustion velocity. In the case of non-uniform distribution of the particles (layered dust cloud), such that the particles number density is relatively small in the region just ahead of the flame front and increases in the distant regions ahead of the flame, the preheating caused by the thermal radiation may trigger additional independent source of ignition. Far ahead of the flame, where number density of particles increases forming a dense cloud of particles, the radiative preheating results in the formation of a temperature gradient with the maximum temperature sufficient for ignition. Depending on the steepness of the temperature gradient formed in the unburned mixture, either deflagration or detonation can be initiated via the Zel'dovich's gradient mechanism. The ignition and the resulting combustion regimes depend on the number density profile and, correspondingly, on the temperature profile (temperature gradient), which is formed in effect of radiation absorption and gas-dynamic expansion. The effect of radiation preheating as stronger as smaller is the normal flame velocity. The effect of radiation heat transfer in the case of coal dust flames propagating in layered particle-gas deposits cloud can result in the spread of combustion wave with velocity up to 1000 m/s and it is a plausible explanation of the origin of dust explosion in coal mines.

  • 22.
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids and gases2015In: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: A Specialist Periodical Report / [ed] K. Kamienska Trela, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015, Vol. 44, p. 235-293Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The review covers the progress in the field of NMR relaxation in fluids during the period from June 2013 through May 2014. The emphasis is on comparatively simple liquids and solutions of physico-chemical and chemical interest, in analogy with the previous periods, but selected biophysics-related topics and relaxation-related work on more complex systems (macromolecular solutions, liquid crystalline systems, glassy and porous materials) are also covered. The first part of the chapter is concerned with general, physical and experimental aspects of nuclear spin relaxation, while the second part is concentrated on applications.

  • 23. Larue, Grégoire S.
    et al.
    Filtness, Ashleigh J.
    Wood, Joanne M.
    Demmel, Sébastien
    Watling, Christopher N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Naweed, Anjum
    Rakotonirainy, Andry
    Is it safe to cross? Identification of trains and their approach speed at level crossings2018In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 103, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Improving the safety at passive rail crossings is an ongoing issue worldwide. These crossings have no active warning systems to assist drivers' decision-making and are completely reliant on the road user perceiving the approach of a train to decide whether to enter a crossing or not. This study aimed to better understand drivers' judgements regarding approaching trains and their perceptions of safe crossing. Thirty-six participants completed a field-based protocol that involved detecting and judging the speeds of fast moving trains. They were asked to report when they first detected an approaching train, when they could first perceive it as moving, as well as providing speed estimates and a decision regarding when it would not be safe to cross. Participants detected the trains similar to 2 km away and were able to perceive the trains as moving when they were 1.6 km away. Large differences were observed between participants but all could detect trains within the range of the longest sighting distances required at passive level crossings. Most participants greatly underestimated travelling speed by at least 30%, despite reporting high levels of confidence in their estimates. Further, most participants would have entered the crossing at a time when the lights would have been activated if the level crossing had been protected by flashing lights. These results suggest that the underestimation of high-speed trains could have significant safety implications for road users' crossing behaviour, particularly as it reduces the amount of time and the safety margins that the driver has to cross the rail crossing.

  • 24. Li, Cuiling
    et al.
    Dag, Oemer
    Dao, Thang Duy
    Nagao, Tadaaki
    Sakamoto, Yasuhiro
    Kimura, Tatsuo
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Graduate School of EEWS, KAIST, Korea.
    Yamauchi, Yusuke
    Electrochemical synthesis of mesoporous gold films toward mesospace-stimulated optical properties2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 6608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous gold (Au) films with tunable pores are expected to provide fascinating optical properties stimulated by the mesospaces, but they have not been realized yet because of the difficulty of controlling the Au crystal growth. Here, we report a reliable soft-templating method to fabricate mesoporous Au films using stable micelles of diblock copolymers, with electrochemical deposition advantageous for precise control of Au crystal growth. Strong field enhancement takes place around the center of the uniform mesopores as well as on the walls between the pores, leading to the enhanced light scattering as well as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which is understandable, for example, from Babinet principles applied for the reverse system of nanoparticle ensembles.

  • 25.
    Luo, Cuicui
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wu, Desheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wu, Dexiang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    A deep learning approach for credit scoring using credit default swaps2017In: Engineering applications of artificial intelligence, ISSN 0952-1976, E-ISSN 1873-6769, Vol. 65, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After 2007-2008 crisis, it is clear that corporate credit scoring is becoming a key role in credit risk management. In this paper, we investigate the performances of credit scoring models applied to CDS data sets. The classification performance of deep learning algorithm such as deep belief networks with Restricted Boltzmann Machines are evaluated and compared with some popular credit scoring models such as logistic regression, multi-layer perceptron and support vector machine. The performance is assessed using the classification accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. It is found that DBN yields the best performance.

  • 26. Mink, Janos
    et al.
    Lin, Yuan-Chih
    Karlsson, Maths
    Österberg, Carin
    Udovic, Terrence J.
    Fahlquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Häussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vibrational properties of -KSiH3 and -RbSiH3: a combined Raman and inelastic neutron scattering study2017In: Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, ISSN 0377-0486, E-ISSN 1097-4555, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 284-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrogen storage materials ASiH(3) (A=K and Rb) represent complex metal hydrides built from metal cations and pyramidal SiH3- ions. At room temperature, SiH3- moieties are randomly oriented because of dynamical disorder (-modifications). At temperatures below 200K, ASiH(3) exist as ordered low-temperature () modifications. The vibrational properties of -ASiH(3) were characterized by a combination of Raman spectroscopy and inelastic neutron scattering. Internal modes of SiH3- are observed in the spectral range 1800-1900cm(-1) (stretching modes) and 890-1000cm(-1) (bending modes). External modes are observed below 500cm(-1). Specifically, SiH3- librations are between 300-450cm(-1) and 270-400cm(-1) for A=K and Rb, respectively, SiH3- translations are between 95 and 160cm(-1), K+ translations are in the range 60-100cm(-1) and Rb+ translations in the range 50-70cm(-1). The red-shift of libration modes for A=Rb is associated with a 15-30% reduction of the libration force constants of SiH3- ions in -RbSiH3. This correlates with a lower temperature for the - order-disorder phase transition (278 vs 298K). Libration modes become significantly anharmonic with increasing temperature but are maintained up to at least 200K. The vibrational properties of ASiH(3) compare well to those of alkali metal borohydrides ABH(4) (A=Na-Cs).

  • 27.
    Mocci, Francesca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Combining MD simulations and NMR spectroscopy for molecular insight and methodological synergy: the integrated MD-NMR method2015In: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: A Specialist Periodical Report / [ed] K. Kamienska Trela, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015, Vol. 44, p. 592-616Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations are highly complementary techniques to study molecular structures, interactions and dynamics. MD simulations are currently reaching the millisecond timescales covering a great variety of dynamical processes. Faster computers and new efficient sampling techniques allow calculations of NMR averages for a more reliable comparison with experiment, while new generations of force fields give better and better agreement between simulated and measured quantities. We review in this Chapter studies where close combination of these two techniques is the method itself to obtain the results and draw conclusions on the dynamics of bio, organic and inorganic systems.

  • 28. Pfirrmann, Thorsten
    et al.
    Lokapally, Ashwin
    Andréasson, Claes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ljungdahl, Per O
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hollemann, Thomas
    SOMA: A Single Oligonucleotide Mutagenesis and Cloning Approach2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, article id e64870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern biology research requires simple techniques for efficient and restriction site-independent modification of genetic material. Classical cloning and mutagenesis strategies are limited by their dependency on restriction sites and the use of complementary primer pairs. Here, we describe the Single Oligonucleotide Mutagenesis and Cloning Approach (SOMA) that is independent of restriction sites and only requires a single mutagenic oligonucleotide to modify a plasmid. We demonstrate the broad application spectrum of SOMA with three examples. First, we present a novel plasmid that in a standardized and rapid fashion can be used as a template for SOMA to generate GFP-reporters. We successfully use such a reporter to assess the in vivo knock-down quality of morpholinos in Xenopus laevis embryos. In a second example, we show how to use a SOMA-based protocol for restriction-site independent cloning to generate chimeric proteins by domain swapping between the two human hRMD5a and hRMD5b isoforms. Last, we show that SOMA simplifies the generation of randomized single-site mutagenized gene libraries. As an example we random-mutagenize a single codon affecting the catalytic activity of the yeast Ssy5 endoprotease and identify a spectrum of tolerated and non-tolerated substitutions. Thus, SOMA represents a highly efficient alternative to classical cloning and mutagenesis strategies.

  • 29. Pitsevich, G.
    et al.
    Doroshenko, I.
    Malevich, A.
    Shalamberidze, E.
    Sapeshko, V.
    Pogorelov, V.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Temperature dependence of the intensity of the vibration-rotational absorption band v(2) of H2O trapped in an argon matrix2017In: Spectrochimica Acta Part A - Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, ISSN 1386-1425, E-ISSN 1873-3557, Vol. 172, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using two sets of effective rotational constants for the ground (000) and the excited bending (010) vibrational states the calculation of frequencies and intensities of vibration-rotational transitions for J '' = 0-2; and J' = 0-3; was carried out in frame of the model of a rigid asymmetric top for temperatures from 0 to 40 K. The calculation of the intensities of vibration-rotational absorption bands of H2O in an Ar matrix was carried out both for thermodynamic equilibrium and for the case of non-equilibrium population of para- and ortho-states. For the analysis of possible interaction of vibration-rotational and translational motions of a water molecule in an Ar matrix by 3D Schrodinger equation solving using discrete variable representation (DVR) method, calculations of translational frequencies of H2O in a cage formed after one argon atom deleting were carried out. The results of theoretical calculations were compared to experimental data taken from literature.

  • 30.
    Pontér, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Pallavicini, Nicola
    Engström, Emma
    Baxter, Douglas C.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Chromium isotope ratio measurements in environmental matrices by MC-ICP-MS2016In: Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, ISSN 0267-9477, E-ISSN 1364-5544, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 1464-1471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analytical procedure consisting of high pressure/temperature acid digestion using an UltraCLAVE system and a one pass, single column matrix separation using DOWEX AG 1X8 anion exchange resin was applied to the determination of Cr concentrations and delta Cr-53 in chromites, soils, and biological matrices (epiphytic lichens and mosses) using a combination of ICP-SFMS and MC-ICP-MS. The overall reproducibility of the method was assessed by replicate preparation and Cr isotope ratio measurements performed by different operators in multiple analytical sessions over a few months and was found to be 0.11 parts per thousand (2 sigma). The accuracy was evaluated using commercially available reference materials for which measured data were compared with certified values (for Cr concentrations) and previously published results (for isotope data). The results demonstrate a uniform Cr isotope composition in soil depth profiles sampled in different urban environments. A strong negative correlation between delta Cr-53 and Cr concentrations in lichens and mosses indicates that airborne Cr from local anthropogenic source(s) is depleted in heavy isotopes.

  • 31.
    Rupprecht, Allan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    On the conformity of valence-optical IR and Raman intensity theories with the Mayants-Averbukh approach2016In: Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, ISSN 0022-2852, E-ISSN 1096-083X, Vol. 322, p. 33-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Averbukh (1990) found that the only interpretations of parameters in the Mayants-Averbukh IR and Raman intensity theories, in terms of electro-optical parameters, which are in conformity with the rotational mode equations are those of the respective valence-optical intensity theories in zeroth-order approximation. Averbukh used the same approach as had been used by Rupprecht (1981, 1984) but did not split the resulting tensors into irreducibel parts, which facilitated his work. To further confirm Averbukh's results, an alternative and more united and direct approach is used in the present work. The conditions of the generalized valence-optical IR and Raman intensity theories in zeroth-order approximation are applied on both sides of the rotational mode equations of the corresponding Mayants-Averbukh intensity theory. This gives directly correct results without invoking symmetry arguments. The present approach has also revealed an intrinsic beauty hidden in the formalism.

  • 32.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Nazem, Atena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Olsson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Towards a contingent anticipatory infant hearing test using eye-tracking2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 35-40Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early identification of infant hearing impairment is imperative to prevent developmental language difficulties. The current diagnostic method is Visual Reinforcement Audiometry (VRA) in which infant response to sound isobserved to establish hearing thresholds. Together with the Karolinska Institute, we are developing an observer-independent contingent anticipatory infant hearing test using eye-tracking to increase reliability and significance levels of the current clinical practice. The present pilot study addresses in particular the first phase of the test in which the eye response is conditioned to occur at sound detection. The aim is to establish how well 6.5-month-olds associate the presence of sound to a certain location via a visual reward.

  • 33. Seifert, Daniel
    et al.
    Seifert, Ralf W.
    Isaksson, Olov H. D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    A test of inventory models with permissible delay in payment2017In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 1117-1128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contrary to the long-standing view in the finance literature that firms should maximise payment delays, research in operations management suggests that long payment delays can be suboptimal. In this study, we reconcile these two views by applying a secondary data approach to established operations management theory. Based on a sample of 3383 groups of public US firms from a novel database, we find that our data are consistent with the causal relations and theoretical predictions of the operations management literature. Firm profitability is positively associated with payment delay. Payment delay, in turn, is positively associated with the capital cost difference between buyer and supplier and negatively associated with the price elasticity of demand and the deterioration rate of inventory. However, we do not observe any significant interaction effects between these factors, which raise a number of questions for future research.

  • 34.
    Steiner, Emilie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mathew, Renny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zimmermann, Iwan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brotin, Thierry
    Edén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kowalewski, Jozef
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Investigation of chloromethane complexes of cryptophane-A analogue with butoxy groups using C-13 NMR in the solid state and solution along with single crystal X-ray diffraction2015In: Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry, ISSN 0749-1581, E-ISSN 1097-458X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 596-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Host-guest complexes between cryptophane-A analogue with butoxy groups (cryptophane-But) and chloromethanes (chloroform, dichloromethane) were investigated in the solid state by means of magic-angle spinning C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The separated local fields method with C-13-H-1 dipolar recoupling was used to determine the residual dipolar coupling for the guest molecules encaged in the host cavity. In the case of chloroform guest, the residual dipolar interaction was estimated to be about 19kHz, consistent with a strongly restricted mobility of the guest in the cavity, while no residual interaction was observed for encaged dichloromethane. In order to rationalize this unexpected result, we performed single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, which confirmed that both guest molecules indeed were present inside the cryptophane cavity, with a certain level of disorder. To improve the insight in the dynamics, we performed a C-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study for the dichloromethane guest in solution. The system was characterized by chemical exchange, which was slow on the chemical shift time scale but fast with respect to the relaxation rates. Despite these disadvantageous conditions, we demonstrated that the data could be analyzed and that the results were consistent with an isotropic reorientation of dichloromethane within the cryptophane cavity.

  • 35.
    Sundström, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Lost in commensuration: ontological tensions in a culture budget meeting2015In: Abstractförteckning: 105. Valuations I: Machineries, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Tao, Liangyan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China.
    Wu, Desheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Economics and Management School of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Liu, Sifeng
    Lambert, James H.
    Schedule risk analysis for new-product development: The GERT method extended by a characteristic function2017In: Reliability Engineering & System Safety, ISSN 0951-8320, E-ISSN 1879-0836, Vol. 167, p. 464-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schedule risk analysis plays a key role in new product development. A typical project-schedule model using the Critical Path Method (CPM) and Program, Evaluation, and Review Technique (PERT) falls short in many practical situations. Instead, a graphical evaluation and review technique (GERT) has been recommended for its ability to address probability branches and loops. This paper introduces a GERT model based on a characteristic function and designs its numerical solution. First, an inversion formula is applied to derive the probability distribution of the completion time of a product development. Second, to address the implications of a due date, a novel measure of schedule risk is introduced to give a view of both loss and probability. Third, an elasticity analysis is used to identify the network parameters that facilitate the control of schedule risk. A case study of new product development in a high-technology enterprise is presented to demonstrate the proposed methods. The approach will be useful in schedule risk analysis across several problem domains including engineering, environment, management, economic development, etc.

  • 37.
    Teymoori, Gholamhasan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Pahari, Bholanath
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Edén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Low-power broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling in MAS NMR by two-fold symmetry pulse schemes for magnetization transfers and double-quantum excitation2015In: Journal of magnetic resonance, ISSN 1090-7807, E-ISSN 1096-0856, Vol. 261, p. 205-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide an experimental, numerical, and high-order average Hamiltonian evaluation of an open-ended series of homonuclear dipolar recoupling sequences, SR2(2p)(1), with p = 1, 2,3, .... While operating at a very low radio-frequency (rf) power, corresponding to a nutation frequency of 1/2 of the magic-angle spinning (MAS) rate (omega(nut) = omega(r)/2), these recursively generated double-quantum (2Q) dipolar recoupling schemes offer a progressively improved compensation to resonance offsets and rf inhomogeneity for increasing pulse-sequence order p. The excellent recoupling robustness to these experimental obstacles, as well as to CSA, is demonstrated for 2Q filtering (2QF) experiments and for driving magnetization transfers in 2D NMR correlation spectroscopy, where the sequences may provide either double or zero quantum dipolar Hamiltonians during mixing. Experimental and numerical demonstrations, which mostly target conditions of ultra-fast MAS (greater than or similar to 50 kHz) and high magnetic fields, are provided for recoupling of C-13 across a wide range of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts, as well as dipolar coupling constants, encompassing [2,3-C-13(2)]alanine, [1,3-C-13(2)]alanine, diammonium [1,4-C-13(2)]fumarate, and [U-C-13]tyrosine. When compared at equal power levels, a superior performance is observed for the SR2(2p)(1) sequences with p >= 3 relative to existing and well-established 2Q recoupling techniques. At ultra-fast MAS, proton decoupling is redundant during the homonuclear dipolar recoupling of dilute spins in organic solids, which renders the family of SR2(2p)(1) schemes the first efficient 2Q recoupling option for general applications, such as 2Q-1Q correlation NMR and high-order multiple-quantum excitation, under truly low-power rf conditions.

  • 38.
    Wallängen, Veronica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, U.S.A..
    Garcia-Sciveres, M.
    Decision feedback equalization for radiation hard data link at 5 Gbps2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id C01067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased particle collision rate following the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to an increased luminosity requires an increased readout data speed, especially for the ATLAS pixel detector, located closest to the particle interaction point. For this reason, during the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment the output data speed of the pixel front-end chips will be increased from 160 Mbps to 5 Gbps. The increased radiation levels will require a radiation hard data transmission link to be designed to carry this data from the pixel front-end to the off-detector system where it will undergo optical conversion. We propose a receiver utilizing the concept of Decision Feedback Equalization (DFE) to be used in this link, where the number of filter taps can be determined from simulations using S-parameter data from measurements of various customized cable prototypes under characterization as candidates to function as transmission medium between the on-chip data driver and the receiver of the link. A dedicated framework has been set up in Matlab to analyze the S-parameter characteristics for the various cable prototypes and investigate the possibilities for signal recovery and maintained signal integrity using DFE, as well as pre-emphasis and different encoding schemes. The simulation results indicate that DFE could be an excellent choice for expanding the system bandwidth to reach required data speeds with minimal signal distortion.

  • 39.
    Wang, Jinyi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mughal, Mudassar Ahmad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    LiveNature: Connecting People with Their Cherished Places2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, Vancouver: ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 113-116Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40. Wiinikka, Henrik
    et al.
    Toth, Pal
    Jansson, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Molinder, Roger
    Broström, Markus
    Sandström, Linda
    Lighty, JoAnn S.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    Particle formation during pressurized entrained flow gasification of wood powder: Effects of process conditions on chemical composition, nanostructure, and reactivity2018In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 189, p. 240-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of operating condition on particle formation during pressurized, oxygen blown gasification of wood powder with an ash content of 0.4 wt% was investigated. The investigation was performed with a pilot scale gasifier operated at 7 bar(a). Two loads, 400 and 600 kW were tested, with the oxygen equivalence ratio (A) varied between 0.25 and 0.50. Particle concentration and mass size distribution was analyzed with a low pressure cascade impactor and the collected particles were characterized for morphology, elemental composition, nanostructure, and reactivity using scanning electron microscopy/high resolution transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. In order to quantify the nanostructure of the particles and identify prevalent sub-structures, a novel image analysis framework was used. It was found that the process temperature, affected both by A and the load of the gasifier, had a significant influence on the particle formation processes. At low temperature (1060 degrees C), the formed soot particles seemed to be resistant to the oxidation process; however, when the oxidation process started at 1119 degrees C, the internal burning of the more reactive particle core began. A further increase in temperature ( > 1313 degrees C) lead to the oxidation of the less reactive particle shell. When the shell finally collapsed due to severe oxidation, the original soot particle shape and nanostructure also disappeared and the resulting particle could not be considered as a soot anymore. Instead, the particle shape and nanostructure at the highest temperatures ( > 1430 degrees C) were a function of the inorganic content and of the inorganic elements the individual particle consisted of. All of these effects together lead to the soot particles in the real gasifier environment having less and less ordered nanostructure and higher and higher reactivity as the temperature increased; i.e., they followed the opposite trend of what is observed during laboratory-scale studies with fuels not containing any ash-forming elements and where the temperature was not controlled by A.

  • 41. Zazouli, Mohammad Ali
    et al.
    Akbari-adergani, Behrouz
    Javanbakht, Mehran
    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    On-line extraction and determination of residual sulfathiazole in pharmaceutical wastewater with molecularly imprinted polymers in a packed cartridge coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography2017In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 9, no 20, p. 3019-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new, rapid and sensitive on-line extraction and determination technique was developed with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in a packed cartridge. An artificial selective polymeric sorbents packed in a polyethylene cartridge were employed for the separation of sulfathiazole residue. The packing particles were synthesized using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker agent, sulfathiazole as a target template molecule and azobisisobutyronitrile as an initiator. The optimal conditions for designing these sorbents were as follows: conditioning using water with pH = 3.0, loading the sample under mild basic aqueous conditions, cleanup using 2 x 2 mL acetonitrile and elution with 3.0 mL 20 mM ammonium acetate : acetonitrile (75 : 25 v/v, pH = 3.0). In this system, an aliquot of extracted template was injected to the HPLC analytical column with acetonitrile : water (75 : 25 v/v) and water (pH adjusted to 3.0 with H3PO4) as the mobile phases in a gradient elution program. The selectivity of the MIPs in the packed cartridge was evaluated by checking several substances with molecular structures similar to that of the template. The results revealed a recovery of more than 92% along with a limit of detection and limit of quantification of 0.05 and 0.16 ng mL(-1), respectively, for the on-line determination of sulfathiazole in pharmaceutical wastewater samples.

  • 42.
    Zhang, Hongqiang
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Lanzhou University, China.
    Akram, Nadeem
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Trautmann, C.
    Schuch, Reinhold
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Transmission profiles of ions through nano-capillaries of rectangular cross-section in mica2017In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, ISSN 0168-583X, Vol. 406, p. 421-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated transmission characteristics of Ne7+ ions through nanocapillaries of rectangular cross-section. The capillaries were produced by chemical etching of ion tracks in phlogopite mica. The two dimensional transmission profiles are rhombic when the capillaries are tilted at angles smaller than the geometrical opening angle given by the aspect ratio of the capillaries. For the angles larger than the geometrical opening angle with respect to the beam direction, the rhombic profile is degrading. Possible reasons for the degrading of the shapes by the deposited charge inside the capillaries are investigated and discussed.

  • 43.
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Muschter, Steffen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Valdés, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A radiation tolerant Data link board for the ATLAS Tile Cal upgrade2016In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 11, article id C01074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the latest, full-functionality revision of the high-speed data link board developed for the Phase-2 upgrade of ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter. The link board design is highly redundant, with digital functionality implemented in two Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGAs, and two Molex QSFP+ electro-optic modules with uplinks run at 10 Gbps. The FPGAs are remotely configured through two radiation-hard CERN GBTx deserialisers (GBTx), which also provide the LHC-synchronous system clock. The redundant design eliminates virtually all single-point error modes, and a combination of triple-mode redundancy (TMR), internal and external scrubbing will provide adequate protection against radiation-induced errors. The small portion of the FPGA design that cannot be protected by TMR will be the dominant source of radiation-induced errors, even if that area is small.

1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf