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  • 1.
    Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Lindqvist-Reis, Patric
    Eriksson, Lars
    Sandström, Dick
    Lidin, Sven
    Persson, Ingmar
    Sandström, Magnus
    Highly hydrated cations: Deficiency, mobility and coordination of water in crystalline nonahydrated scandium(III), yttrium(III) and lanthanoid(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate2005In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 11, no 14, p. 4065-4077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trivalent lanthanide-like metal ions coordinate nine water oxygen atoms, which form a tricapped trigonal prism in a large number of crystalline hydrates. Water deficiency, randomly distributed over the capping positions, was found for the smallest metal ions in the isomorphous nonahydrated trifluoromethanesulfonates, [M(H2O)(n)]CF3SO3)(3), in which M=Sc-III, Lu-III, Yb-III, Tm-III or Er-III. The hydration number n increases (n=8.0(1), 8.4(1), 8.7(1), 8.8(1) and 8.96(5), respectively) with increasing ionic size. Deuterium (H-2) solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed fast positional exchange between the coordinated capping and prism water molecules; this exchange started at temperatures higher than about 280 K for lutetium(m) and below 268 K for scandium(m). Similar positional exchange for the fully nonahydrated yttrium(m) and lanthanum(m) compounds started at higher temperatures, over about 330 and 360 K, respectively. An exchange mechanism is proposed that can exchange equatorial and capping water molecules within the restrictions of the crystal lattice, even for fully hydrated lanthanoid(III) ions. Phase transitions occurred for all the water-deficient compounds at; 185 K. The hydrated scandium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate transforms reversibly (Delta H degrees= -0.80(1) kJ mol(-1) on cooling) to a trigonal unit cell that is almost nine times larger, with the scandium ion surrounded by seven fully occupied and two partly occupied oxygen atom positions in a distorted capped trigonal prism. The hydrogen bonding to the trifluoromethanesulfonate anions stabilises the trigonal prism of water ligands, even for the crowded hydration sphere of the smallest metal ions in the series. Implications for the Lewis acid catalytic activity of the hydrated scandium(III) and lanthanoid(III) trifluoromethanesulfonates for organic syntheses performed in aqueous media are discussed.

  • 2. Abdallah, Qasem M. A.
    et al.
    Phillips, Roger M.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Helleday, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Cosentino, Laura
    Abdel-Rahman, Hamdy
    Etzad, Jasarat
    Wheelhouse, Richard T.
    Kiakos, Konstantinos
    Bingham, John P.
    Hartley, John A.
    Patterson, Laurence H.
    Pors, Klaus
    Minor structural modifications to alchemix influence mechanism of action and pharmacological activity2012In: Biochemical Pharmacology, ISSN 0006-2952, E-ISSN 1356-1839, Vol. 83, no 11, p. 1514-1522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alchemix is an exemplar of a class of anthraquinone with efficacy against multidrug resistant tumours. We have explored further the mechanism of action of alchemix and investigated the effect of extending its side arm bearing the alkylating functionality with regard to DNA binding and activity against multidrug resistant cancer cells. Increasing the distance between the intercalating chromophore and the alkylating functionality of ICT2901 (propyl), ICT2902 (butyl) and ICT2903 (pentyl), led to a higher number of DNA alkylation sites, more potent topoisomerase II inhibition and generated more apoptotic and necrotic cells when analysed in p53-proficient HCT116 cells. Intriguingly, alchemix, the compound with the shortest distance between its intercalative chromophore and alkylating functionality (ethyl), did not conform to this SAR. A different toxicity pattern against DNA repair defective CHO cell lines as well as arrest of cells in Cl supports a somewhat distinct mode of action by alchemix compared with its analogues. Importantly, both alchemix and ICT2901 demonstrated greater cytotoxic activity against anthraquinone-resistant MCF-7/adr cells than wild-type MCF-7 cells. Subtle synthetic modification in this anthraquinone series has led to significant changes to the stability of DNA-compound complexes and cellular activity. Given that the failure of chemotherapy in the clinic is often associated with MDR, the results of both alchemix and ICT2901 represent important advances towards improved therapies.

  • 3.
    Abdel Rehim, Abbi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Abdel Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Screening and determination of drugs in human saliva utilizing microextraction by packed sorbent and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2013In: BMC Biomedical chromotography, ISSN 0269-3879, E-ISSN 1099-0801, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1188-1191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a new method for collecting and handling saliva samples using an automated analytical microsyringe and microextraction by packed syringe (MEPS). The screening and determination of lidocaine in human saliva samples utilizing MEPS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were carried out. An exact volume of saliva could be collected. The MEPS C-8-cartridge could be used for 50 extractions before it was discarded. The extraction recovery was about 60%. The pharmacokinetic curve of lidocaine in saliva using MEPS-LC-MS/MS is reported.

  • 4.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zinc as chaperone-mimicking agent for retardation of amyloid beta peptide fibril formation2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 17, p. 5407-5412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal ions have emerged to play a key role in the aggregation process of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide that is closely related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanistic process of peptide-metal interactions, however, has been challenging to obtain. By applying a combination of NMR relaxation dispersion and fluorescence kinetics methods we have investigated quantitatively the thermodynamic A beta-Zn2+ binding features as well as how Zn2+ modulates the nucleation mechanism of the aggregation process. Our results show that, under near-physiological conditions, substoichiometric amounts of Zn2+ effectively retard the generation of amyloid fibrils. A global kinetic profile analysis reveals that in the absence of zinc A beta(40) aggregation is driven by a monomer-dependent secondary nucleation process in addition to fibril-end elongation. In the presence of Zn2+, the elongation rate is reduced, resulting in reduction of the aggregation rate, but not a complete inhibition of amyloid formation. We show that Zn2+ transiently binds to residues in the N terminus of the monomeric peptide. A thermodynamic analysis supports a model where the N terminus is folded around the Zn2+ ion, forming a marginally stable, short-lived folded A beta(40) species. This conformation is highly dynamic and only a few percent of the peptide molecules adopt this structure at any given time point. Our findings suggest that the folded A beta(40)-Zn2+ complex modulates the fibril ends, where elongation takes place, which efficiently retards fibril formation. In this conceptual framework we propose that zinc adopts the role of a minimal antiaggregation chaperone for A beta(40).

  • 5.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ilback, Nils-Gunnar
    The synthetic food colouring agent Allura Red AC (E129) is not genotoxic in a flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay in vivo2013In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 59, p. 86-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The safety of several azo colouring agents, used as food additives, has during the years been questioned. Allura Red AC (E129) has in some publications been classified as genotoxic. In fact, in the European Union, Allura Red is permitted as a food additive in human food, but, surprisingly, it was not acceptable as an additive for use in animal feed. In this study we have evaluated whether Allura Red is genotoxic using a flow cytometer-based micronucleus assay in peripheral blood of mice. Male FVB mice were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of various doses of Allura Red and sacrificed at 46 h after treatment. The tested doses were 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Each dose group constituted three mice, except for in the dose group of 1000 mg/kg b.w., which constituted four mice. Blood samples were collected and the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMNPCE) and the cell proliferation (%PCE) was determined. The analyses did not show any significant difference in the %PCE or in the fMNPCE. Consequently, under the testing circumstances one can conclude that Allura Red is not genotoxic.

  • 6.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Thermal physiology and metabolism: Interplay between heat generation and energy homeostasis2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mammal metabolism is intimately connected to the maintenance of body temperature. While metabolic pathways invariably produce heat as a by-product, the natural heat present in the environment also plays a role in defining the adaptive metabolism and general physiology of an organism. This thesis aims to discuss basic aspects of energy expenditure and their interactions with energy stores and body composition. In Paper I, we apply a new technique – high-resolution laser-Doppler imaging – to describe physiological regulatory features of adrenergically-stimulated blood flow in brown adipose tissue, and evaluate the validity of blood flow as a parameter to estimate nonshivering thermogenesis. Paper II focuses on the central regulation of body temperature. In the absence of bombesin receptor subtype-3, mice present an altered neurological body temperature setpoint, while peripheral thermogenic capacity remains intact. We conclude that brown adipose tissue malfunction is not the cause of the hypothermia observed in this mouse model. Paper III incorporates measurements of body temperature to the energy expenditure of different sources: basal metabolic rate, physical activity, thermic effect of food, and cold-induced thermogenesis. We describe basic aspects of dynamic insulation, energetic costs of circadian variation and hypothesize that physical activity may change the body temperature setpoint. Paper IV describes methodological issues related to glucose tolerance tests in obese mice. We conclude that the erroneous scaling of doses may affect the interpretation of metabolic health in mouse models, and suggest a new methodology. Paper V describes the outcomes caused by the expression of the human Cidea protein in adipose tissue of mice and suggests that this protein may clarify the link between adipose tissue expansion and healthy obesity. Paper VI explores the dissociation between thiazolidinedione-induced adipose tissue “browning” and reduced blood glycaemia. We demonstrate that although this pharmacological class tends to induce some level of brown adipose tissue recruitment, this phenomenon does not define its antidiabetic effects.

  • 7.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Fischer, Alexander W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Mattsson, Charlotte
    de Jong, Jasper M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ryden, Mikael
    Laurencikiene, Jurga
    Arner, Peter
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petrovic, Natasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cidea improves the metabolic profile through expansion of adipose tissue2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 7433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In humans, Cidea (cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor alpha-like effector A) is highly but variably expressed in white fat, and expression correlates with metabolic health. Here we generate transgenic mice expressing human Cidea in adipose tissues (aP2-hCidea mice) and show that Cidea is mechanistically associated with a robust increase in adipose tissue expandability. Under humanized conditions (thermoneutrality, mature age and prolonged exposure to high-fat diet), aP2-hCidea mice develop a much more pronounced obesity than their wild-type littermates. Remarkably, the malfunctioning of visceral fat normally caused by massive obesity is fully overcome-perilipin 1 and Akt expression are preserved, tissue degradation is prevented, macrophage accumulation is decreased and adiponectin expression remains high. Importantly, the aP2-hCidea mice display enhanced insulin sensitivity. Our data establish a functional role for Cidea and suggest that, in humans, the association between Cidea levels in white fat and metabolic health is not only correlative but also causative.

  • 8. Acevedo, Nathalie
    et al.
    Bornacelly, Adriana
    Mercado, Dilia
    Unneberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mittermann, Irene
    Valenta, Rudolf
    Kennedy, Malcolm
    Scheynius, Annika
    Caraballo, Luis
    Genetic Variants in CHIA and CHI3L1 Are Associated with the IgE Response to the Ascaris Resistance Marker ABA-1 and the Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 12016In: plos one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0167453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helminth infections and allergic diseases are associated with IgE hyperresponsiveness but the genetics of this phenotype remain to be defined. Susceptibility to Ascaris lumbricoides infection and antibody levels to this helminth are associated with polymorphisms in locus 13q33-34. We aimed to explore this and other genomic regions to identify genetic variants associated with the IgE responsiveness in humans. Forty-eight subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, with extreme values of specific IgE to Ascaris and ABA-1, a resistance marker of this nematode, were selected for targeted resequencing. Burden analyses were done comparing extreme groups for IgE values. One-hundred one SNPs were genotyped in 1258 individuals of two well-characterized populations from Colombia and Sweden. Two low-frequency coding variants in the gene encoding the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (CHIA rs79500525, rs139812869, tagged by rs10494133) were found enriched in high IgE responders to ABA-1 and confirmed by genetic association analyses. The SNP rs4950928 in the Chitinase 3 Like 1 gene (CHI3L1) was associated with high IgE to ABA-1 in Colombians and with high IgE to Bet v 1 in the Swedish population. CHIA rs10494133 and ABDH13 rs3783118 were associated with IgE responses to Ascaris. SNPs in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Member 13b gene (TNFSF13B) encoding the cytokine B cell activating Factor were associated with high levels of total IgE in both populations. This is the first report on the association between low-frequency and common variants in the chitinases- related genes CHIA and CHI3L1 with the intensity of specific IgE to ABA-1 in a population naturally exposed to Ascaris and with Bet v 1 in a Swedish population. Our results add new information about the genetic influences of human IgE responsiveness; since the genes encode for enzymes involved in the immune response to parasitic infections, they could be helpful for understanding helminth immunity and allergic responses. We also confirmed that TNFSF13B has an important and conserved role in the regulation of total IgE levels, which supports potential evolutionary links between helminth immunity and allergic response.

  • 9.
    Adam, Lucille
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    López-González, Moisés
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Björk, Albin
    Pålsson, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Poux, Candice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Spetz, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Early Resistance of Non-virulent Mycobacterial Infection in C57BL/6 Mice Is Associated With Rapid Up-Regulation of Antimicrobial Cathelicidin Camp2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early clearance of tuberculosis is the successful eradication of inhaled bacteria before the development of an adaptive immune response. We previously showed, by utilizing a non-virulent mycobacteria infection model, that C57BL/6 mice are more efficient than BALB/c in their control of bacterial growth in the lungs during the first weeks of the infection. Here, we assessed early (within 1-3 days) innate immune events locally in the lungs to identify factors that may contribute to the control of non-virulent mycobacterial burden. We confirmed that C57BL/6 mice are more resistant to infection compared with BALB/c after intranasal inoculation with mycobacterium. Transcriptomic analyses revealed a remarkably silent signature in C57BL/6 mice despite effective control of bacterial growth. In contrast, BALB/c mice up-regulated genes associated with neutrophil and myeloid cell chemotaxis and migration. Flow cytometry analyses corroborated the transcriptomic analyses and demonstrated influx of both neutrophil and myeloid cell populations in BALB/c mice, while these did not increase in C57BL/6 mice. We further detected increased release of TNF-alpha from BALB/c lung cells but limited release from C57BL/6-derived cells. However, C57BL/6 mice showed a marked early up-regulation of the Camp gene, encoding the cathelicidin CRAMP peptide, post-mycobacterial exposure. CRAMP (LL-37 in human) expression in the lungs was confirmed using immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, these findings show that C57BL/6 mice can clear the mycobacterial infection early and that this early control is associated with high CRAMP expression in the lungs without concomitant influx of immune cells. The role of CRAMP/LL-37 during mycobacterial infection may be relevant for novel protective strategies, and warrants further studies of human cohorts.

  • 10.
    Adlerz, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Processing of the amyloid precursor protein and its paralogues amyloid precursor-like proteins 1 and 22007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder which is histopathologically characterised by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Amyloid plaques consist of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) that can form aggregates in the brain. Aβ is generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through proteolytic cleavage. APP belongs to a conserved protein family that also includes the two paralogues, APP-like proteins 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2). Despite the immense amount of research on APP, motivated by its implication in AD, the function of this protein family has not yet been determined. In this thesis, we have studied the expression and proteolytic processing of the APP protein family. Our results are consistent with previous findings that suggest a role for APP during neuronal development. Treatment of cells with retinoic acid (RA) resulted in increased synthesis. In addition, we observed that RA treatment shifted the processing of APP from the amyloidogenic to the non-amyloidogenic pathway. The proteins in the APP family have been hard to distinguish both with respect to function and proteolytic processing. However, for development of new drugs with APP processing enzymes as targets this is of great importance. Our studies suggest similarities, but also differences in the mechanism regulating the processing of the different paralogues. We found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) had different impact on the members of the APP family. Most interestingly, we also found that the mechanism behind the increased processing in response to IGF-1 was not identical between the homologous proteins. In summary, our results indicate that in terms of regulation APLP1 and APLP2 differ more from each other than from APP. Our studies open up the possibility of finding means to selectively block Aβ production without interfering with the processing and function of the paralogous proteins.

  • 11.
    Adlerz, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Beckman, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Holback, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Tehranian, Roya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Cortés Toro, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Iverfeldt, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Accumulation of the amyloid precursor-like protein APLP2 and reduction of APLP1 in retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma cells upon curcumin-induced neurite retraction2003In: Brain Research. Molecular Brain Research, ISSN 0169-328X, E-ISSN 1872-6941, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 62-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) belongs to a conserved gene family, also including the amyloid precursor-like proteins, APLP1 and APLP2. The function of these three proteins is not yet fully understood. One of the proposed roles of APP is to promote neurite outgrowth. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of the expression levels of APP family members during neurite outgrowth. We observed that retinoic acid (RA)-induced neuronal differentiation of human SH-SY5Y cells resulted in increased expression of APP, APLP1 and APLP2. We also examined the effect of the NFκB, AP-1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on the RA-induced expression levels of these proteins. We found that treatment with curcumin counteracted the RA-induced mRNA expression of all APP family members. In addition, we observed that curcumin treatment resulted in neurite retraction without any effect on cell viability. Surprisingly, curcumin had differential effects on the APLP protein levels in RA-differentiated cells. RA-induced APLP1 protein expression was blocked by curcumin, while the APLP2 protein levels were further increased. APP protein levels were not affected by curcumin treatment. We propose that the sustained levels of APP and the elevated levels of APLP2, in spite of the reduced mRNA expression, are due to altered proteolytic processing of these proteins. Furthermore, our results suggest that APLP1 does not undergo the same type of regulated processing as APP and APLP2.

  • 12.
    Adlerz, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Soomets, Ursel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology. University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Holmlund, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Virland, Saade
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Iverfeldt, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Down-regulation of amyloid precursor protein by peptide nucleic acid oligomer in cultured rat primary neurons and astrocytes2003In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 336, no 1, p. 55-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its proteolytic cleavage products, the amyloid P peptides, have been implicated as a cause of Alzheimer's disease. Peptide nucleic acids (PNA), the DNA mimics, have been shown to block the expression of specific proteins at both transcriptional and translational levels. Generally, the cellular uptake of PNA is low. However, recent studies have indicated that the effect of unmodified antisense PNA uptake is more pronounced in nervous tissue. In this study we have shown that biotinylated PNA directed to the initiator codon region of the APP mRNA (-4 - +11) was taken up into the cytoplasm of primary rat cerebellar granule cells and cortical astrocytes, using fluorescence and confocal microscopy studies. Uptake of PNA was faster in neurons than in astrocytes. Western blotting analysis showed that APP was strongly down-regulated in both neurons and astrocytes. Thus, unmodified PNA can be used for studies on the function of APP in neurons and astrocytes.

  • 13.
    Adrian Meredith, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Björklund, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Edlund, Michael
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Vrang, Lotta
    Hallberg, Anders
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Uppsala universitet.
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and Synthesis of BACE-1 Inhibitors Containing a New Hydroxyethylene (HE) Scaffold: Potent activities in a cellular assayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a preceding report from our group we disclosed the development of a novel HE transition state isostere with a difluorophenoxymethyl side chain in the P1 position and a methoxy group in the P1’ position furnishing highly potent inhibitors of BACE-1 (i.e. lead compound 1), which moreover exhibit very promising selectivity over cathepsin D. In a continuation of this work with the aim at improving on the cell-based activity and pharmacokinetic properties, we have further developed the SAR for the P1 side chain of inhibitor 1 whereby the P1 side chain oxygen has been substituted for an amine, a carbon or a bond. The chemistry developed for the previous HE inhibitor structure 1 has now been extended to readily accommodate the introduction of new P1 side chains into this new HE scaffold. These modifications have given rise to several highly potent inhibitors where the most potent displayed a BACE-1 Ki value of 0.2 nM and a cell-based Aβ40 IC50 value of 9 nM. Thus, regarding the enzyme inhibition in the cell assay a more than 600-fold improvement compared to compound 1 was achieved via minor structural alterations.

  • 14.
    Adrian Meredith, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Björklund, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jansson, Katarina
    Hallberg, Anders
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Uppsala universitet.
    Rosenquist, Åsa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    P2’-truncated BACE-1 inhibitors with a novel hydroxethylene-like core2010In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 542-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly potent BACE-1 protease inhibitors derived from a novel hydroxyethylene-like core structure were recently developed by our group using X-ray crystal structure data and molecular modelling. In a continuation of this work guided by molecular modelling we have explored a truncated core motif where the P2’ amide group is replaced by an ether linkage resulting in a set of alkoxy, aryloxy and alkylaryl groups, with the overall aim to reduce molecular weight and the number of amide bonds to increase permeability and bestow the inhibitors with drug-like features. The most potent of these inhibitors displayed a BACE-1 IC50 value of 140 nM. The synthesis of these BACE-1 inhibitors utilizes readily available starting materials, furnishing the target compounds in good overall yields.

  • 15.
    Adrian Meredith, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wallberg, Hans
    Vrang, Lotta
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.
    Parkes, Kevin
    Hallberg, Anders
    Institutionen för läkemedelskemi, Uppsala universitet.
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Design and Synthesis of Novel P2 Substituents in Diol-based HIV Protease Inhibitors2010In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 160-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis and SAR of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing novel P2 structural elements are presented. The inhibitors were designed having hydrogen bond accepting P2 substituents to probe potential favorable interactions to Asp-29/Asp-30 of the HIV-1 protease backbone utilizing inhibitor 3 as a model template. Several inhibitors were synthesized from an L-Val-methylamide P2 motif by appending hydrogen bonding moieties from either the isopropyl side chain or from the methylamide portion. The most promising inhibitors 4a and 4e displayed Ki values of 1.0 nM and 0.7 nM respectively and EC50 values in the MT4 cell-based assay of 0.17 µM and 0.33 µM respectively, a slight loss in potency compared to lead inhibitor 3. These inhibitors were also tested against an HIV protease inhibitor resistant strain carrying the M46I, V82F, and I84V mutations. Inhibitors 4a and 4e displayed a 3 and 4 fold change respectively compared with HIV wild type, whereas lead inhibitor 3 showed a higher 9 fold change. This study further demonstrate the chemical tractability of the approach where various P2 substituents can be introduced in just one chemical step from lactone x enabling facile modifications of the overall properties in this inhibitor class.

  • 16.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Johansson, Sven-Erik
    Levander, Maria
    Alm, Per Olof
    Oreland, Lars
    Smoking habits – Associations with personality/behavior, platelet monoamine oxidase activity and plasma thyroid hormone levels2017In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 118, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to outline results from our scientific studies on the associations among childhood behavior, adult personality, and biochemical factors in smoking habits. The studies consisted of: (1) follow-up of young criminals and controls, subdivided into risk for antisocial behavior groups, based on childhood rating levels of a projective test; and adult smoking habit groups; and (2) a large group of young adults examined on the same inventories. Personality in terms of KSP and EPQ-I scale scores, controlled for intelligence, indicated that the high and very high risk groups displayed significantly higher self-rated impulsiveness, anxiety, and nonconformity, as compared to the low risk group. Further, the very high risk group subjects, found to be overrepresented among subjects with heavy smoking habits, displayed lower mean platelet MAO-B activity and higher thyroid hormone levels than the low risk group. Thus, the higher the childhood risk for antisocial behavior, the clearer the adult personality pattern making subjects more disposed for smoking appeared; and the higher smoking habits, the stronger the relationships with biochemical measures. Results are discussed in terms of possible underlying mechanisms influencing personality and smoking habits.

  • 17. Ahlstrand, Tuuli
    et al.
    Torittu, Annamari
    Elovaara, Heli
    Välimaa, Hannamari
    Pöllänen, Marja T.
    Kasvandik, Sergo
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ihalin, Riikka
    Interactions between the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans secretin HofQ and host cytokines indicate a link between natural competence and interleukin-8 uptake2018In: Virulence, ISSN 2150-5594, E-ISSN 2150-5608, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1205-1223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally competent bacteria acquire DNA from their surroundings to survive in nutrient-poor environments and incorporate DNA into their genomes as new genes for improved survival. The secretin HofQ from the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with DNA uptake. Cytokine sequestering is a potential virulence mechanism in various bacteria and may modulate both host defense and bacterial physiology. The objective of this study was to elucidate a possible connection between natural competence and cytokine uptake in A. actinomycetemcomitans. The extramembranous domain of HofQ (emHofQ) was shown to interact with various cytokines, of which IL-8 exhibited the strongest interaction. The dissociation constant between emHofQ and IL-8 was 43nM in static settings and 2.4M in dynamic settings. The moderate binding affinity is consistent with the hypothesis that emHofQ recognizes cytokines before transporting them into the cells. The interaction site was identified via crosslinking and mutational analysis. By structural comparison, relateda type I KH domain with a similar interaction site was detected in the Neisseria meningitidis secretin PilQ, which has been shown to participate in IL-8 uptake. Deletion of hofQ from the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome decreased the overall biofilm formation of this organism, abolished the response to cytokines, i.e., decreased eDNA levels in the presence of cytokines, and increased the susceptibility of the biofilm to tested -lactams. Moreover, we showed that recombinant IL-8 interacted with DNA. These results can be used in further studies on the specific role of cytokine uptake in bacterial virulence without interfering with natural-competence-related DNA uptake.

  • 18. Aho, Vilma
    et al.
    Ollila, Hanna M.
    Rantanen, Ville
    Kronholm, Erkki
    Surakka, Ida
    van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
    Lehto, Maili
    Matikainen, Sampsa
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Härmä, Mikko
    Sallinen, Mikael
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Jauhiainen, Matti
    Alenius, Harri
    Paunio, Tiina
    Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja
    Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immune Response-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental and Epidemiological Studies in Humans2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10, article id e77184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological studies have shown that short or insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk for metabolic diseases and mortality. To elucidate mechanisms behind this connection, we aimed to identify genes and pathways affected by experimentally induced, partial sleep restriction and to verify their connection to insufficient sleep at population level. The experimental design simulated sleep restriction during a working week: sleep of healthy men (N = 9) was restricted to 4 h/night for five nights. The control subjects (N = 4) spent 8 h/night in bed. Leukocyte RNA expression was analyzed at baseline, after sleep restriction, and after recovery using whole genome microarrays complemented with pathway and transcription factor analysis. Expression levels of the ten most up-regulated and ten most down-regulated transcripts were correlated with subjective assessment of insufficient sleep in a population cohort (N = 472). Experimental sleep restriction altered the expression of 117 genes. Eight of the 25 most up-regulated transcripts were related to immune function. Accordingly, fifteen of the 25 most up-regulated Gene Ontology pathways were also related to immune function, including those for B cell activation, interleukin 8 production, and NF-kappa B signaling (P<0.005). Of the ten most up-regulated genes, expression of STX16 correlated negatively with self-reported insufficient sleep in a population sample, while three other genes showed tendency for positive correlation. Of the ten most down-regulated genes, TBX21 and LGR6 correlated negatively and TGFBR3 positively with insufficient sleep. Partial sleep restriction affects the regulation of signaling pathways related to the immune system. Some of these changes appear to be long-lasting and may at least partly explain how prolonged sleep restriction can contribute to inflammation-associated pathological states, such as cardiometabolic diseases.

  • 19.
    Akerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Hallvig, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Anund, Anna
    Fors, Carina
    Schwarz, Johanna F A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Having to stop driving at night because of dangerous sleepiness - awareness, physiology and behaviour2013In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 380-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of accidents are due to the driver falling asleep at the wheel, but details of this link have not been studied on a real road. The purpose of the present study was to describe the development of sleepiness indicators, leading to the drive being terminated prematurely by the onboard expert driving instructor because of imminent danger. Eighteen individuals participated during a day drive and a night drive on a motorway (both 90 min). Eight drivers terminated (N) prematurely (after 43 min) because of sleep-related imminent danger [according to the driving instructor or their own judgement (two cases)]. The results showed very high sleepiness ratings (8.5 units on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) immediately before termination (<7 at a similar time interval for those 10 who completed the drive). Group N also showed significantly higher levels of sleep intrusions on the electroencephalography/electro-oculography (EEG/EOG) than those who completed the drive (group C). The sleep intrusions were increased in group N during the first 40 min of the night drive. During the day drive, sleep intrusions were increased significantly in group N. The night drive showed significant increases of all sleepiness indicators compared to the day drive, but also reduced speed and driving to the left in the lane. It was concluded that 44% of drivers during late-night driving became dangerously sleepy, and that this group showed higher perceived sleepiness and more sleep intrusions in the EEG/EOG.

  • 20. Alakurtti, Kati
    et al.
    Johansson, Jarkko J.
    Joutsa, Juho
    Laine, Matti
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Rinne, Juha O.
    Long-term test-retest reliability of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D-2/3 receptor binding: study with [C-11]raclopride and high-resolution PET2015In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, ISSN 0271-678X, E-ISSN 1559-7016, Vol. 35, no 7, p. 1199-1205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We measured the long-term test-retest reliability of [C-11]raclopride binding in striatal subregions, the thalamus and the cortex using the bolus-plus-infusion method and a high-resolution positron emission scanner. Seven healthy male volunteers underwent two positron emission tomography (PET) [C-11]raclopride assessments, with a 5-week retest interval. D-2/3 receptor availability was quantified as binding potential using the simplified reference tissue model. Absolute variability (VAR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values indicated very good reproducibility for the striatum and were 4.5%/0.82, 3.9%/0.83, and 3.9%/0.82, for the caudate nucleus, putamen, and ventral striatum, respectively. Thalamic reliability was also very good, with VAR of 3.7% and ICC of 0.92. Test-retest data for cortical areas showed good to moderate reproducibility (6.1% to 13.1%). Our results are in line with previous test-retest studies of [C-11]raclopride binding in the striatum. A novel finding is the relatively low variability of [C-11]raclopride binding, providing suggestive evidence that extrastriatal D-2/3 binding can be studied in vivo with [C-11]raclopride PET to be verified in future studies.

  • 21. Al-Anati, Lauy
    et al.
    Viluksela, Matti
    Strid, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Swedish Toxicology Sciences Research Center (Swetox), Sweden.
    Andersson, Patrik L.
    Stenius, Ulla
    Högberg, Johan
    Hydroxyl metabolite of PCB 180 induces DNA damage signaling and enhances the DNA damaging effect of benzo[a]pyrene2015In: Chemico-Biological Interactions, ISSN 0009-2797, E-ISSN 1872-7786, Vol. 239, p. 164-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-dioxin-like (NDL) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their hydroxyl metabolites (OH-PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants in human tissues and blood. The toxicological impact of these metabolites is poorly understood. In this study rats were exposed to ultrapure PCB180 (10-1000 mg/kg bw) for 28 days and induction of genotoxic stress in liver was investigated. DNA damage signaling proteins (pChk1Ser317 and gamma H2AXSer319) were increased dose dependently in female rats. This increase was paralleled by increasing levels of the metabolite 3'-OH-PCB180. pChk1 was the most sensitive marker. In in vitro studies HepG2 cells were exposed to 1 mu M of PCB180 and 3'-OH-PCB180 or the positive control benzo[a]pyrene (BaP, 5 mu M). 3'-OH-PCB180, but not PCB180, induced CYP1A1 mRNA and gamma H2AX. CYP1A1 mRNA induction was seen at 1 h, and gamma H2AX at 3 h. The anti-oxidant N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) completely prevented, and 17 beta-estradiol amplified the gamma H2AX induction by 3'-OH-PCB180. As 3'-OH-PCB180 induced CYP1A1, a major BaP-metabolizing and activating enzyme, interactions between 3'-OH-PCB180 and BaP was also studied. The metabolite amplified the DNA damage signaling response to BaP. In conclusion, metabolism of PCB180 to its hydroxyl metabolite and the subsequent induction of CYP1A1 seem important for DNA damage induced by PCB180 in vivo. Amplification of the response with estradiol may explain why DNA damage was only seen in female rats.

  • 22.
    Ali, Magdi Mahmoud
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Farouk, Salah E.
    Noori, Suzan I. A.
    Shamad, Mahdi M.
    Tayeb, Omer
    ElGhazali, Gehad
    Berzins, Klavs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    FcγRIIa (CD32) polymorphism and onchocercal skin disease: implications for the development of severe reactive onchodermatitis (ROD)2007In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0002-9637, E-ISSN 1476-1645, Vol. 77, no 6, p. 1074-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathologic manifestations of Onchocerca volvulus infection depend on the interplay between the host and the parasite. A genetic single nucleotide polymorphism in the FcγRIIa gene, resulting in arginine (R) or histidine (H) at position 131, affects the binding to the different IgG subclasses and may influence the clinical variations seen in onchocerciasis. This study investigated the relationship between this polymorphism and disease outcome. FcγRIIa genotyping was performed on clinically characterized onchocerciasis patients (N = 100) and healthy controls (N = 74). FcγRIIa genotype R/R131 frequencies were significantly higher among patients with severe dermatopathology (P < 0.001). Increased risk of developing this form was mostly associated with one tribe (Masalit) (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1-9.9, P = 0.042). The H131 allele was found to be significantly associated with a reduced risk of having the severe form of the disease (adjusted OR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.13-0.46, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the polymorphism influences the clinical outcome of onchocerciasis.

  • 23. Alier, Kwai
    et al.
    Chen, Yishen
    Eriksson Sollenberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Smith, Peter
    Selective stimulation of GalR1 and GalR2 in rat substantia gelatinosa reveals a cellular basis for the anti- and pro-nociceptive actions of galanin2008In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galanin modulates spinal nociceptive processing by interacting with two receptors, GalR1 and GalR2. The underlying neurophysiological mechanisms were examined by whole-cell recording from identified neurons in the substantia gelatinosa of young adult rats. GalR1 was activated with a 'cocktail' containing the GalR1/2 agonist, AR-M 961 (0.5 mu M), in the presence of the GalR2 antagonist, M871 (1.0-2.5 mu M). GalR2 was activated with the selective agonist, AR-M 1896 (0.5-1.0 mu M). Application of the 'GalR1 agonist cocktail' often activated an inwardly-rectifying conductance in delay firing (excitatory) and tonically firing (inhibitory) neurons. This conductance was not activated by AR-M 1896 which instead decreased or increased an outwardly-rectifying conductance at voltages positive to -70 rnV. Despite this variability in its actions on current-voltage relationships, AR-M 1896 very consistently decreased membrane excitability, as measured by cumulative action potential latency in response to a depolarizing current ramp. This strong GalR2-mediated effect was seen in neurons where membrane conductance was decreased, and where membrane excitability might be predicted to increase. GalR2 was also located presynaptically, as AR-M 1896 increased the interevent interval of spontaneous EPSCs in both delay and tonic cells. By contrast, the 'GalR1 agonist cocktail' had little effect on spontaneous EPSCs, suggesting that presynaptic terminals do not express GalR1. These diverse actions of GalR1 and GalR2 activation on both inhibitory and excitatory neurons are discussed in relation to the known spinal antinociceptive and pro-nociceptive actions of galanin, to the possible association of GalR1 with the inhibitory G-protein, G(i/o) and to report that GalR2 activation suppresses Ca(2+) channel currents.

  • 24.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Lan
    Yan, Shiqiang
    Du, Heng
    Pinho, Catarina Moreira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chen, John Xi
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yan, Shirley ShiDu
    Decreased proteolytic activity of the mitochondrial amyloid-β degrading enzyme, PreP peptidasome, in Alzheimer's disease brain mitochondria2011In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 75-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the neurotoxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been shown in brain mitochondria of AD patients and of AD transgenic mouse models. The presence of Aβ in mitochondria leads to free radical generation and neuronal stress. Recently, we identified the presequence protease, PreP, localized in the mitochondrial matrix in mammalian mitochondria as the novel mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme. In the present study, we examined PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of the human brain's temporal lobe, an area of the brain highly susceptible to Aβ accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We found significantly lower hPreP activity in AD brains compared with non-AD age-matched controls. By contrast, in the cerebellum, a brain region typically spared from Aβ accumulation, there was no significant difference in hPreP activity when comparing AD samples to non-AD controls. We also found significantly reduced PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of AD transgenic mouse brains (Tg mAβPP and Tg mAβPP/ABAD) when compared to non-transgenic aged-matched mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial fractions isolated from AD brains and Tg mAβPP mice had higher levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, an oxidative product, as compared with those from non-AD and nonTg mice. Accordingly, activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly reduced in the AD mitochondria. These findings suggest that decreased PreP proteolytic activity, possibly due to enhanced ROS production, contributes to Aβ accumulation in mitochondria leading to the mitochondrial toxicity and neuronal death that is exacerbated in AD. Clearance of mitochondrial Aβ by PreP may thus be of importance in the pathology of AD.

  • 25.
    Alkemar, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Wenner-Gren Institute for Experimental Biology.
    Ribosome and ribosomal RNA Structure: An experimental and computational analysis of expansion segments in eukaryotic ribosomal RNA2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribosomes are large ribonucleoprotein complexes which incorporate amino acids into peptide chains during translational process in all types of living cells. The eukaryotic ribosome is larger compared to its prokaryotic counterpart. The size differences are due to a larger protein part and that the rRNA contains eukaryote specific expansion segments (ES). Cryo-EM reconstruction has visualized many ES on the ribosomal surface which have given clues about function and structural features. However, the secondary structures of most ES are unknown or ill defined. In this thesis, the secondary and also to a certain extent the tertiary structures of several ES are determined by using computational methods and biochemical experimental techniques. The juxtaposition of ES6 close to ES3 in the Cryo-EM image of the yeast ribosome suggested that ES3 and ES6 might interact. A computational analysis of more than 2900 sequences shows that a complementary helical region of seven to nine contiguous base pairs can form between ES3 and ES6 in almost all analyzed sequences. Biochemical in situ experiments support the proposed interaction. Secondary structure models are presented for ES3 and ES6 in 18S rRNA and ES39 in 28S rRNA, where homologous structural elements could be modeled in the experimentally analyzed ribosomes from fungi, plants and mammals. The structure models were further supported by computational methods where the ES6 structure and the ES39 structure could be formed in more than 6000 and 900 sequences respectively. A tertiary structure model of ES3 and ES6 including the helical interaction is presented. An in vitro transcribed and folded ES6 sequence differed from that observed in situ, suggesting that chaperones, ribosomal proteins, and/or the tertiary rRNA interaction could be involved in the in vivo folding of ES6. An analysis of the similarities between ES39 structures suggests that it might be under selective constraint to preserve its secondary structure.

  • 26.
    Almkvist, Ove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Sweden.
    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena
    Thordardottir, Steinunn
    Amberla, Kaarina
    Axelman, Karin
    Basun, Hans
    Kinhult-Ståhlbom, Anne
    Lilius, Lena
    Remes, Anne
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Viitanen, Matti
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Graff, Caroline
    Predicting Cognitive Decline across Four Decades in Mutation Carriers and Non-carriers in Autosomal-Dominant Alzheimer's Disease2017In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, ISSN 1355-6177, E-ISSN 1469-7661, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate cognitive performance including preclinical and clinical disease course in carriers and non-carriers of autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease (adAD) in relation to multiple predictors, that is, linear and non-linear estimates of years to expected clinical onset of disease, years of education and age. Methods: Participants from five families with early-onset autosomal-dominant mutations (Swedish and Arctic APP, PSEN1 M146V, H163Y, and I143T) included 35 carriers (28 without dementia and 7 with) and 44 non-carriers. All participants underwent a comprehensive clinical evaluation, including neuropsychological assessment at the Memory Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. The time span of disease course covered four decades of the preclinical and clinical stages of dementia. Neuropsychological tests were used to assess premorbid and current global cognition, verbal and visuospatial functions, short-term and episodic memory, attention, and executive function. Results: In carriers, the time-related curvilinear trajectory of cognitive function across disease stages was best fitted to a formulae with three predictors: years to expected clinical onset (linear and curvilinear components), and years of education. In non-carriers, the change was minimal and best predicted by two predictors: education and age. The trajectories for carriers and non-carriers began to diverge approximately 10 years before the expected clinical onset in episodic memory, executive function, and visuospatial function. Conclusions: The curvilinear trajectory of cognitive functions across disease stages was mimicked by three predictors in carriers. In episodic memory, executive and visuospatial functions, the point of diverging trajectories occurred approximately 10 years ahead of the clinical onset compared to non-carriers.

  • 27.
    Amelina, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Holm, Tina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Delivering catalase to yeast peroxisomes using cell-penetrating peptidesIn: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Amoudruz, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Saghafian-Hedengren, Shanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Nilsson, Caroline
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Impaired Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in monocytes from 5-year-old allergic children2009In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 155, no 3, p. 387-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative composition of the two major monocytic subsets CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ is altered in some allergic diseases. These two subsets display different patterns of Toll-like receptor levels, which could have implications for activation of innate immunity leading to reduced immunoglobulin E-specific adaptive immune responses. This study aimed to investigate if allergic status at the age of 5 years is linked to differences in monocytic subset composition and their Toll-like receptor levels, and further, to determine if Toll-like receptor regulation and cytokine production upon microbial stimuli is influenced by the allergic phenotype. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 5-year-old allergic and non-allergic children were stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan. Cells were analysed with flow cytometry for expression of CD14, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The release of cytokines and chemokines [tumour necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70] into culture supernatants was measured with cytometric bead array. For unstimulated cells there were no differences in frequency of the monocytic subsets or their Toll-like receptor levels between allergic and non-allergic children. However, monocytes from allergic children had a significantly lower up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 upon peptidoglycan stimulation. Further, monocytes from allergic children had a higher spontaneous production of IL-6, but there were no differences between the two groups regarding p38-MAPK activity or cytokine and chemokine production upon stimulation. The allergic subjects in this study have a monocytic population that seems to display a hyporesponsive state as implicated by impaired regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 upon peptidoglycan stimulation.

  • 29. Anderson, Maria E.
    et al.
    Runesson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Saar, Indrek
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry. University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Robinson, John K.
    Galanin, through GalR1 but not GalR2 receptors, decreases motivation at times of high appetitive behavior2013In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 239, p. 90-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galanin is a 29/30-amino acid long neuropeptide that has been implicated in many physiological and behavioral functions. Previous research has shown that i.c.v. administration of galanin strongly stimulates food intake in sated rats when food is freely available, but fails to stimulate this consumption when an operant response requirement is present. Using fixed ratio (FR) schedules, we sought to further clarify galanin's role in motivated behavior by administering galanin i.c.v. to rats working on fixed ratio schedules requiring either a low work condition (FR1) or higher work conditions (FR > 1) to obtain a 0.2% saccharin reward. Rats in the FR > 1 group were assigned to either an FR3, FR5 or FR7 schedule of reinforcement. The rate of reinforcement decreased for only the FR > 1 group as compared to saline controls. Furthermore, injections of GalR1 receptor agonist M617 led to a similar, marginally significant decrease in the number of reinforcers received in the FR > 1 condition, but a decrease was not seen after injections of GalR2 receptor agonist M1153. Taken together, these results show that galanin may be playing a role in decreasing motivation at times of high appetitive behavior, and that this effect is likely mediated by the GalR1 receptor.

  • 30. Andersson, Evelyn
    et al.
    Rück, Christian
    Lavebratt, Catharina
    Hedman, Erik
    Schalling, Martin
    Lindefors, Nils
    Eriksson, Elias
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Furmark, Tomas
    Genetic Polymorphisms in Monoamine Systems and Outcome of Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, article id e79015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The role of genetics for predicting the response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) has only been studied in one previous investigation. The serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR), the catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met, and the tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) G-703Tpolymorphisms are implicated in the regulation of amygdala reactivity and fear extinction and therefore might be of relevance for CBT outcome. The aim of the present study was to investigate if these three gene variants predicted response to CBT in a large sample of SAD patients.

    Method

    Participants were recruited from two separate randomized controlled CBT trials (trial 1: n = 112, trial 2: n = 202). Genotyping were performed on DNA extracted from blood or saliva samples. Effects were analyzed at follow-up (6 or 12 months after treatment) for both groups and for each group separately at post-treatment. The main outcome measure was the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report.

    Results

    At long-term follow-up, there was no effect of any genotype, or gene × gene interactions, on treatment response. In the subsamples, there was time by genotype interaction effects indicating an influence of the TPH2 G-703T-polymorphism on CBT short-term response, however the direction of the effect was not consistent across trials.

    Conclusions

    None of the three gene variants, 5-HTTLPR, COMTval158met and TPH2 G-703T, was associated with long-term response to CBT for SAD.

  • 31. Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. University College London, England.
    Shafran, Roz
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. University College London, England.
    Long-term effects of internet-supported cognitive behaviour therapy2018In: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, ISSN 1473-7175, E-ISSN 1744-8360, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 21-28Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Internet-supported and therapist-guided cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) is effective for a range of problems in the short run, but less is known about the long-term effects with follow-ups of two years or longer.

    Areas covered: This paper reviews studies in which the long-term effects of guided ICBT were investigated. Following literature searches in PubMed and other sources meta-analytic statistics were calculated for 14 studies involving a total of 902 participants, and an average follow-up period of three years. Studies were from Sweden (n = 11) or the Netherlands (n = 3). Long-term outcome studies were found for panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, depression, mixed anxiety and depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, pathological gambling, stress and chronic fatigue. The duration of the treatments was usually short (8–15 weeks). The pre-to follow-up effect size was Hedge’s g = 1.52, but with a significant heterogeneity. The average symptom improvement across studies was 50%. Treatment seeking in the follow-up period was not documented and few studies mentioned negative effects.

    Expert commentary: While effects may be overestimated, it is likely that therapist-supported ICBT can have enduring effects. Long-term follow-up data should be collected for more conditions and new technologies like smartphone-delivered treatments.

  • 32. Andersson, Linus
    et al.
    Sandberg, Petra
    Olofsson, Jonas K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses2018In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A widely held view is that top-down modulation of sensory information relies on an amodal control network that acts through the thalamus to regulate incoming signals. Olfaction lacks a direct thalamic projection, which suggests that it may differ from other modalities in this regard. We investigated the late positive complex (LPC) amplitudes of event-related potentials (ERP) from 28 participants, elicited by intensity-matched olfactory, auditory and visual stimuli, during a condition of focused attention, a neutral condition, and a condition in which stimuli were to be actively ignored. Amplitudes were largest during the attend condition, lowest during the ignore condition, with the neutral condition in between. A Bayesian analysis resulted in strong evidence for similar effects of task across sensory modalities. We conclude that olfaction, despite its unique neural projections, does not differ from audition and vision in terms of task-dependent neural modulation of the LPC.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Relevance of the Irrelevant: Using Task-Irrelevant Emotional Stimuli to Test the Load-Hypothesis through ERP’s2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The role of attention and perceptual resources were studied in a one-back task and a letter-search task, both using the same stimuli. In the letter task, pictures were used as task-irrelevant and distracting emotional stimuli. The emotional processing of the pictures was measured through the Late Positive Potential (LPP), an event-related potential (ERP) recorded with EEG. LPP activity was significantly greater to emotional than neutral stimuli during the one-back task; this shows that emotional stimuli were processed during an easy task (low load). However, LPP activity dropped for all stimuli during the difficult perceptual task (high load). Selective processes of attention are discussed, in relation to Load Theory and the ability to ignore task-irrelevant, but emotionally significant, stimuli.

  • 34.
    Andreasson, Anna N.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Jones, M. P.
    Walker, M. M.
    Talley, N. J.
    Nyhlin, H.
    Agréus, L.
    Prediction pathways for innate immune pathology, IBS, anxiety and depression in a general population (The POPCOL Study)2013In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 32, p. e46-e46Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to ascertain whether low grade innate inflammation contributes to a pathway of depression and anxiety via irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We evaluated innate immune cell counts in colonic mucosa in normal subjects and those with IBS (Rome III) from a population based study in which 745 randomly selected subjects had a colonoscopy (mean age 51 years;57% women). Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) per 100 enterocytes and eosinophils (eos) per five non-overlapping high power fields (HPF) were counted in 90 controls and 100 cases; immunocytochemistry (CD117) was performed for mast cells per 5HPF in 80 controls and 81 cases. IELs, mast cells and eos were individually summed over 5 sites (terminal ileum, caecum, transverse colon, sigmoid colon and rectum). Anxiety and depression scores were calculated from HADS. A causal model path model which hypothesises immune cells being associated with IBS which, in turn, is associated with elevated anxiety and depression was tested using path analysis implemented in the MPlus software. All hypothesised paths reached statistical significance (p < .05) supporting the individual hypothesized pathways. The overall model fit was reasonable although imperfect. In conclusion, a significant contribution of innate immune inflammatory load leading to anxiety and depression via IBS was found. Whether therapy directed to decreasing this inflammatory load also lifts depression and anxiety should be further explored.

  • 35. Anh, Nhi
    et al.
    Taylan, Fulya
    Zachariadis, Vasilios
    Ivanov Öfverholm, Ingegerd
    Lindstrand, Anna
    Vezzi, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Lötstedt, Britta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Nordenskjöld, Magnus
    Nordgren, Ann
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Barbany, Gisela
    High-resolution detection of chromosomal rearrangements in leukemias through mate pair whole genome sequencing2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The detection of recurrent somatic chromosomal rearrangements is standard of care for most leukemia types. Even though karyotype analysis-a low-resolution genome-wide chromosome analysis-is still the gold standard, it often needs to be complemented with other methods to increase resolution. To evaluate the feasibility and applicability of mate pair whole genome sequencing (MP-WGS) to detect structural chromosomal rearrangements in the diagnostic setting, we sequenced ten bone marrow samples from leukemia patients with recurrent rearrangements. Samples were selected based on cytogenetic and FISH results at leukemia diagnosis to include common rearrangements of prognostic relevance. Using MP-WGS and in-house bioinformatic analysis all sought rearrangements were successfully detected. In addition, unexpected complexity or additional, previously undetected rearrangements was unraveled in three samples. Finally, the MP-WGS analysis pinpointed the location of chromosome junctions at high resolution and we were able to identify the exact exons involved in the resulting fusion genes in all samples and the specific junction at the nucleotide level in half of the samples. The results show that our approach combines the screening character from karyotype analysis with the specificity and resolution of cytogenetic and molecular methods. As a result of the straightforward analysis and high-resolution detection of clinically relevant rearrangements, we conclude that MP-WGS is a feasible method for routine leukemia diagnostics of structural chromosomal rearrangements.

  • 36. Appelberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Lindberg, Eva
    Pavlenko, Tatjana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Lung aeration during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea2010In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    P>Background: Previous studies have indicated that patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have altered ventilation and lung volumes awake and the results suggest that this may be a determinant of severity of desaturations during sleep. However, little is known about regional lung aeration during sleep in patients with OSA. Methods: Twelve patients with OSA were included in the study. Computed tomography was used to study regional lung aeration during wakefulness and sleep. Lung aeration was calculated in ml gas/g lung tissue in four different regions of interest (ROI1-4), along the border of the lung from ventral to dorsal. Results: Lung aeration in the dorsal (dependent) lung region (ROI4) was lower during sleep compared to wakefulness 0 center dot 78 +/- 0 center dot 19 versus 0 center dot 88 +/- 0 center dot 19 (mean +/- SD) ml gas/g lung tissue (P = 0 center dot 005). Associations were found between awake expiratory reserve volume and change in lung aeration from wakefulness to sleep in ROI4 (r = -0 center dot 69; P = 0 center dot 012). In addition, the change in lung aeration in the dorsal region correlated to sleep time (r = 0 center dot 69; P = 0 center dot 014) but not to time in supine position. The difference in lung aeration between inspiration and expiration (i.e. ventilation), was larger in the ventral lung region when expressed as ml gas per g lung tissue. In two patients it was noted that, during on-going obstructive apnoea, lung aeration tended to be increased rather than decreased. Conclusions: Aeration in the dorsal lung region is reduced during sleep in patients with OSA. The decrease is related to lung volume awake and to sleep time.

  • 37.
    Apraiz Larrucea, Itxaso
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Development and application of a proteomic approach to the assessment of pollution in the marine environment2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, assessment of the health of coastal waters is recognized as being important for both the conservation of nature and well-being of humans. Anthropogenic pollution has been the focus of extensive research for some time and a variety of programs for the monitoring and assessment of environmental pollution have been developed. Determination of the levels of pollution in sensitive ‘sentinels’ such as mussels, allows monitoring of these levels in a given area over a prolonged period of time. Furthermore, the biological effects of pollution are reflected in a series of biomarkers, none of which provides a general picture of the sentinel’s state of health and all of which are individually specific for certain pollutants and influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors.

    In an attempt to improve biomonitoring of marine pollution, we have developed two proteomic approaches here. In the first portion of the thesis, a proteomic analysis was performed on peroxisomes isolated from mussels exposed either to one of three model anthropogenic pollutants, or two different types of crude oil, or from mussels exposed to the Prestige oil spill. Application of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) provided protein expression signatures (PES) for exposure to these different pollutants.Furthermore, several individual protein components of these PES could be putatively identified.

    In the second portion of this work, such analysis of subproteomes was developed further in order to improve the applicability of this approach to biomonitoring. A simple fractionation procedure in combination with liquid chromatography and 2-DE provided samples from mussels residing in different regions of a pollution gradient around the harbor of Gothenburg, as well as from mussels exposed to two types of fuel oil similar to that of the Prestige that were suitable for environmental proteomics. In addition, we constructed a model for this approach that can be cross-validated in the future and applied to assess sources of fuel oil pollution in connection with biomonitoring programs.

  • 38.
    Arama, Charles
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Giusti, Pablo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Boström, Stephanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Varani, Stefania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Troye Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Interethnic Differences in Antigen-Presenting Cell Activation and TLR Responses in Malian Children during Plasmodium falciparum Malaria2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 3, p. e18319-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fulani ethnic group from West Africa is relatively better protected against Plasmodium falciparum malaria as compared to other sympatric ethnic groups, such as the Dogon. However, the mechanisms behind this lower susceptibility to malaria are largely unknown, particularly those concerning innate immunity. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and in particular dendritic cells (DCs) are important components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether APCs obtained from Fulani and Dogon children exhibited differences in terms of activation status and toll-like receptor (TLR) responses during malaria infection. Lower frequency and increased activation was observed in circulating plasmacytoid DCs and BDCA-3+ myeloid DCs of infected Fulani as compared to their uninfected counterparts. Conversely, a higher frequency and reduced activation was observed in the same DC subsets obtained from peripheral blood of P. falciparum-infected Dogon children as compared to their uninfected peers. Moreover, infected individuals of both ethnic groups exhibited higher percentages of both classical and inflammatory monocytes that were less activated as compared to their non-infected counterparts. In line with APC impairment during malaria infection, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 responses were strongly inhibited by P. falciparum infection in Dogon children, while no such TLR inhibition was observed in the Fulani children. Strikingly, the TLR-induced IFN-γ release was completely abolished in the Dogon undergoing infection while no difference was seen within infected and non-infected Fulani. Thus, P. falciparum infection is associated with altered activation status of important APC subsets and strongly inhibited TLR responses in peripheral blood of Dogon children. In contrast, P. falciparum induces DC activation and does not affect the innate response to specific TLR ligands in Fulani children. These findings suggest that DCs and TLR signalling may be of importance for the protective immunity against malaria observed in the Fulani.

  • 39. Arama, Charles
    et al.
    Quin, Jaclyn E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Kouriba, Bourema
    Östlund Farrants, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Doumbo, Ogobara K.
    Epigenetics and Malaria Susceptibility/Protection: A Missing Piece of the Puzzle2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1733Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A better understanding of stable changes in regulation of gene expression that result from epigenetic events is of great relevance in the development of strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. Histone modification and DNA methylation are key epigenetic mechanisms that can be regarded as marks, which ensure an accurate transmission of the chromatin states and gene expression profiles over generations of cells. There is an increasing list of these modifications, and the complexity of their action is just beginning to be understood. It is clear that the epigenetic landscape plays a fundamental role in most biological processes that involve the manipulation and expression of DNA. Although the molecular mechanism of gene regulation is relatively well understood, the hierarchical order of events and dependencies that lead to protection against infection remain largely unknown. In this review, we propose that host epigenetics is an essential, though relatively under studied, factor in the protection or susceptibility to malaria.

  • 40. Arbesu Valdivia, Alejandro
    et al.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Romero Batista, Yamilet
    Kumar, Saroj
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Characterization of recombinant antibodies for cancer therapy by infrared spectroscopy2013In: Biologicals (Print), ISSN 1045-1056, E-ISSN 1095-8320, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the structure of the recombinant antibodies 1E10, anti-CD20 and hR3, which are used as anti-cancer therapeutic drugs. We tested their sensitivity against different conditions and treatments such as pH, temperature, freeze-thaw cycles and drying, which are relevant for the practical usefulness of the drugs. All antibodies were stable against moderate temperature increases (up to 50 degrees C) and pH changes (range 5-9). 1E10 was sensitive to extreme pH values (pH 3 and 12), whereas hR3 was most sensitive to temperature (at and above 60 degrees C). We did not observe any significant changes upon freeze-thaw and drying treatments. The secondary structure content of all three antibodies was estimated to be similar to that of IgG with similar to 64% beta-sheet, 0% alpha-helix and similar to 36% other structure. (C) 2012 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization.

  • 41.
    Arko-Mensah, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Wenner-Gren Institute for Experimental Biology.
    Immune evasion and identification of biomarkers associated with mycobacterial infection2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Arko-Mensah, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Wenner-Gren Institute for Experimental Biology.
    Mycobacterial infection: Immune evasion, host susceptibility and immunological markers of diagnostic importance2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    IIn the first study, we investigated the functional implications of prolonged TLR signalling on IFN-γ mediated killing of mycobacteria by murine macrophages in vitro. TLR2, but not TLR4 ligation interfered with IFN-γ mediated killing of mycobacteria in macrophages. In terms of mechanisms, neither TNF nor nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly affected, and the refractoriness induced could be reversed with increasing amounts of IFN-γ In the second study, we aimed to identify immunological markers of diagnostic importance in both the respiratory tract and serum during pulmonary mycobacterial infection in mice. We found that increased levels of immunological markers in the respiratory tract, but not serum, correlated better with active mycobacterial infection in the lungs, suggesting that the immune response in the respiratory tract is more reflective of the infection status and pathology than the systemic response. Finally, we investigated the level and nature of immune responses to pulmonary mycobacterial infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, two mouse strains known to exhibit different susceptibilities to infection with several intracellular pathogens, including mycobacteria. We showed that increased susceptibility of BALB/c mice to early mycobacterial infection was associated with reduced Th1 immune responses, and increased sTNFR secretion in the lung. Moreover, BALB/c mice recruited fewer monocytes/macrophages to the lung, and although IFN-γ stimulation of infected bone marrow derived macrophages in both mouse strains resulted in induction of antimycobacterial activity, BALB/c mice had a reduced capacity to kill ingested bacteria. The work presented in this thesis provide further insight into the mechanisms involved in the host-pathogen interaction; from persistence, to the immunological processes induced by the pathogen, to susceptibility of the host to infection.

  • 43. Arko-Mensah, John
    et al.
    Rahman, Muhammad Jubayer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Julián, Eshter
    Horner, Gudron
    Singh, Mahavir
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Increased levels of immunological markers in the respiratory tract but not in serum correlate with active pulmonary mycobacterial infection in mice2009In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, ISSN 1198-743X, E-ISSN 1469-0691, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immunological tests for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) have relied mostly on detection of immune markers in serum or release of cytokines by mononuclear cells in vitro. These tests, although useful, sometimes fail to discriminate between active infection and contact with mycobacteria or vaccination. TB is primarily a disease of the lung, and therefore identification of immunological markers in the respiratory tract will be more likely to reflect the infection status or disease activity. In this study, it is demonstrated that active infection of mice with Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), but not exposure to heat-killed BCG, induced production of interleukin-12 (IL-12), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) locally in the lungs, as detected in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. There was a strong correlation between bacterial growth in the lung and levels of sTNFRs, and to some extent IL-12 and IFN-gamma, in BAL fluid. Furthermore, sTNFR levels increased significantly in BAL fluid after reactivation of controlled infection with dexamethasone, and this correlated with increased bacterial growth in the lungs. Finally, infection, but not exposure to non-replicating mycobacteria, induced specific IgG and IgA in BAL fluid. Elevated levels of all biomarkers measured were also detected in the serum, but correlation with infection was not as clear as in the case of BAL fluid. Taken together, the detection of sTNFRs and mycobacterium-specific antibodies, especially IgA, locally in the lungs could be used as immunological markers for the diagnosis of TB.

  • 44.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Morey, Jennifer N.
    Segerström, Suzanne C.
    Self-rated health and interleukin-6: Longitudinal relationships in older adults2016In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 54, p. 226-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both self-rated health (SRH) and inflammation are implicated in chronic diseases and premature mortality. Better SRH is associated with lower proinflammatory cytokines, but there is little evidence about whether this relationship is more stable or dynamic.

    Objective: To study the between- and within-person associations between SRH and IL-6.

    Methods: Older adults (N=131; Mage=75years) rated their health and provided blood samples for analysis of IL-6 at separate occasions every 6months over a period up to 5years. Age, sex, BMI, neuroticism, and statin use were examined as covariates in multilevel models.

    Results: In bivariate models, better SRH, lower BMI, younger age, and female sex correlated with lower IL-6. In multilevel models, stable SRH (between-person differences; p<.001) but not dynamic SRH (within-person changes; p=.93) correlated with IL-6. The stable relationship persisted with demographic and health covariates in the model.

    Conclusions: Better stable SRH but not dynamic SRH was robustly associated with lower IL-6 among older adults, lending support to previous cross-sectional findings on the relation between inflammatory markers and SRH. The findings suggest that trait-like mechanisms, rather than changes over a time scale of 6-month waves, govern this association. To further investigate the mechanisms behind the SRH-IL-6 association, studies with different measurement frequencies, higher within-person variability, and experimental approaches are warranted.

  • 45.
    Arrighi, Romanico B. G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Ebikeme, Charles
    Jiang, Yang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa
    Barrett, Michael P.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Cell-penetrating peptide TP10 shows broad-spectrum activity against both Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei brucei2008In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 3414-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria and trypanosomiasis are diseases which afflict millions and for which novel therapies are urgently required. We have tested two well-characterized cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for antiparasitic activity. One CPP, designated TP10, has broad-spectrum antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum, both blood and mosquito stages, and against blood-stage Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

  • 46.
    Asgard, Rikard
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Biosci., Uppsala, Sweden.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Golkar, Siv Osterman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hellman, Bjorn
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Biosci., Uppsala, Sweden.
    Czene, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Evidence for different mechanisms of action behind the mutagenic effects of 4-NOPD and OPD: the role of DNA damage, oxidative stress and an imbalanced nucleotide pool2013In: Mutagenesis, ISSN 0267-8357, E-ISSN 1464-3804, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 637-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mutagenicity of 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (4-NOPD) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD) was compared using the Mouse Lymphoma Assay (MLA) with or without metabolic activation (S9). As expected, OPD was found to be a more potent mutagen than 4-NOPD. To evaluate possible mechanisms behind their mutagenic effects, the following end points were also monitored in cells that had been exposed to similar concentrations of the compounds as in the MLA: general DNA damage (using a standard protocol for the Comet assay); oxidative DNA damage (using a modified procedure for the Comet assay in combination with the enzyme hOGG1); reactive oxygen species (ROS; using the CM-H(2)DCFDA assay); and the balance of the nucleotide pool (measured after conversion to the corresponding nucleosides dC, dT, dG and dA using high-performance liquid chromatography). Both compounds increased the level of general DNA damage. Again, OPD was found to be more potent than 4-NOPD (which only increased the level of general DNA damage in the presence of S9). Although less obvious for OPD, both compounds increased the level of oxidative DNA damage. However, an increase in intracellular ROS was only observed in cells exposed to 4-NOPD, both with and without S9 (which in itself induced oxidative stress). Both compounds decreased the concentrations of dA, dT and dC. A striking effect of OPD was the sharp reduction of dA observed already at very low concentration, both with and without S9 (which in itself affected the precursor pool). Taken together, our results indicate that indirect effects on DNA, possibly related to an unbalanced nucleotide pool, mediate the mutagenicity and DNA-damaging effects of 4-NOPD and OPD to a large extent. Although induction of intracellular oxidative stress seems to be a possible mechanism behind the genotoxicity of 4-NOPD, this pathway seems to be of less importance for the more potent mutagen OPD.

  • 47.
    Aslam, Muhammad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster GSTE6 and E7; characterization, immobilization and transgenic overexpression2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are universally distributed in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes. They play a pivotal role in the metabolism and detoxication of numerous endogenous and exogenous electrophiles by conjugating them with ubiquitous tripeptide glutathione. In this study we have immobilized two heterologously expressed and purified Epsilon-class enzymes, GSTE6 and GSTE7, from of Drosophila melanogaster on nanoporous alumina membranes. The membranes were derivatized with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane and the amino groups were activated with carbonyldiimidazole to allow coupling of the enzymes. Kinetic analyses of the immobilized enzymes were carried out in a circulating flow system using CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) as substrate, followed by specificity screening with alternative substrates. A good correlation was observed between the substrate screening data for immobilized enzyme and corresponding data for the enzymes in solution. The stability of the immobilized enzymes was virtually identical to that for the enzymes in solution and no leakage of enzyme from the matrix could be observed.

    Additionally, we have investigated the catalytic activities of GSTE7 with organic isothiocyanates (ITCs). These reactive compounds are strong electrophilic molecules produced in plants by the hydrolysis of glucosinolates and exert toxicity in biological tissues.  Our in vitro studies, showed high catalytic activity of GSTE7 towards ITCs. We have then explored the in vivo effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) in transgenic fruit flies overexpressing GSTE7. A concentration of 0.25 mM PEITC in standard fly food was shown to be toxic to flies and significantly shortened the lifespan. We noticed that overexpression of GSTE7 could protect females from the initial acute toxic effects, but had no positive effect on long term exposure. The effect on males seems to be the opposite to that of females, where a higher mortality was seen in fly males overexpressing GST E7 after one week of exposure.  On the other hand 1mM concentration of AITC showed no toxic effects, but dramatically reduced the oviposition activity of wild-type flies in comparison to the transgenic flies.

  • 48.
    Aslam, Muhammad
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Dahlberg, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Mannervik, Bengt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Mannervik, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Transgenic Overexpression of Glutathione Transferase E7 in Drosophila Attenuates Toxicity of Organic Isothiocyanates Affecting Survival and OvipositionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic isothiocyanates (ITCs) are allelochemicals produced by plants in order to combat insects and other herbivores. The compounds are toxic electrophiles that can be inactivated and conjugated with intracellular glutathione in reactions catalyzed by glutathione transferases (GSTs). The Drosophila melanogaster GSTE7 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for functional studies. The enzyme showed high catalytic activity with various isothiocyanates including phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which in millimolar dietary concentrations conferred toxicity to adult D. melanogaster leading to death or a shortened life-span of the flies. In situ hybridization revealed a maternal contribution of GSTE7 transcripts to embryos, and strongest zygotic expression in the digestive tract.  Transgenesis involving the GSTE7 gene controlled by an actin promoter produced viable flies expressing the GSTE7 transcript ubiquitously. Transgenic females show a significant extension in life-span when subjected to the same PEITC treatment as the wild-type flies. By contrast, transgenic male flies showed no significant effect in the first few days, and subsequently showed a somewhat lower survival rate. At 1 mM AITC concentration, no toxicity was noted. However, the oviposition activity was dramatically enhanced from a very low level in wild-type flies reared in the presence of 1 mM AITC to values an order of magnitude higher for the transgenic flies. The results demonstrate a clear protective effect of GSTE7 against exposure to ITC allelochemicals which can affect both life-span and fecundity of female flies.

  • 49. Assadi, Ghazaleh
    et al.
    Vesterlund, Liselotte
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Mazzurana, Luca
    Cordeddu, Lina
    Schepis, Danika
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Ruhrmann, Sabrina
    Fabbri, Alessia
    Vukojevic, Vladana
    Percipalle, Piergiorgio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. New York University Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Salomons, Florian A.
    Laurencikiene, Jurga
    Törkvist, Leif
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Functional Analyses of the Crohn's Disease Risk Gene LACC12016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Genetic variation in the Laccase (multicopper oxidoreductase) domain-containing 1 (LACC1) gene has been shown to affect the risk of Crohn's disease, leprosy and, more recently, ulcerative colitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. LACC1 function appears to promote fatty-acid oxidation, with concomitant inflammasome activation, reactive oxygen species production, and anti-bacterial responses in macrophages. We sought to contribute to elucidating LACC1 biological function by extensive characterization of its expression in human tissues and cells, and through preliminary analyses of the regulatory mechanisms driving such expression. Methods We implemented Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR, immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry analyses to investigate fatty acid metabolism-immune nexus (FAMIN; the LACC1 encoded protein) expression in subcellular compartments, cell lines and relevant human tissues. Gene-set enrichment analyses were performed to initially investigate modulatory mechanisms of LACC1 expression. A small-interference RNA knockdown in vitro model system was used to study the effect of FAMIN depletion on peroxisome function. Results FAMIN expression was detected in macrophage-differentiated THP-1 cells and several human tissues, being highest in neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells among peripheral blood cells. Subcellular co-localization was exclusively confined to peroxisomes, with some additional positivity for organelle endomembrane structures. LACC1 co-expression signatures were enriched for genes involved in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathways, and PPAR ligands downregulated FAMIN expression in in vitro model systems. Conclusion FAMIN is a peroxisome-associated protein with primary role(s) in macrophages and other immune cells, where its metabolic functions may be modulated by PPAR signaling events. However, the precise molecular mechanisms through which FAMIN exerts its biological effects in immune cells remain to be elucidated.

  • 50. Athanasiu, Lavinia
    et al.
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Fernandes, Carla
    Christoforou, Andrea
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Lundervold, Astri J.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Eriksson, Elias
    Sundet, Kjetil
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Nyberg, Lars
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    A genetic association study of CSMD1 and CSMD2 with cognitive function2017In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 61, p. 209-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complement cascade plays a role in synaptic pruning and synaptic plasticity, which seem to be involved in cognitive functions and psychiatric disorders. Genetic variants in the closely related CSMD1 and CSMD2 genes, which are implicated in complement regulation, are associated with schizophrenia. Since patients with schizophrenia often show cognitive impairments, we tested whether variants in CSMD1 and CSMD2 are also associated with cognitive functions per se. We took a discovery-replication approach, using well-characterized Scandinavian cohorts. A total of 1637 SNPs in CSMD1 and 206 SNPs in CSMD2 were tested for association with cognitive functions in the NCNG sample (Norwegian Cognitive NeuroGenetics; n = 670). Replication testing of SNPs with p-value < 0.001 (7 in CSMD1 and 3 in CSMD2) was carried out in the TOP sample (Thematically Organized Psychosis; n =1025) and the BETULA sample (Betula Longitudinal Study on aging, memory and dementia; n = 1742). Finally, we conducted a meta-analysis of these SNPs using all three samples. The previously identified schizophrenia marker in CSMD1 (SNP rs10503253) was also included. The strongest association was observed between the CSMDI SNP rs2740931 and performance in immediate episodic memory (p-value = 5 Chi 10(-6), minor allele A, MAF 0.48-0.49, negative direction of effect). This association reached the study-wide significance level (p <= 1.2 Chi 10(-5)). SNP rs10503253 was not significantly associated with cognitive functions in our samples. In conclusion, we studied n = 3437 individuals and found evidence that a variant in CSMD1 is associated with cognitive function. Additional studies of larger samples with cognitive phenotypes will be needed to further clarify the role of CSMD1 in cognitive phenotypes in health and disease.

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