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  • 1.
    Addo, Rebecka N.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wiens, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Nord, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Larsson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Olfactory Functions in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorders2017In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often characterized by atypical sensory behavior (hyperor hyporeactivity) although evidence is scarce regarding olfactory abilities in ASD; 16 adults with high-functioning ASD (mean age: 38.2, SD: 9.7) and 14 healthy control subjects (mean age: 42.0 years, SD: 12.5) were assessed in odor threshold, free and cued odor identification, and perceived pleasantness, intensity, and edibility of everyday odors. Although results showed no differences between groups, the Bayes Factors (close to 1) suggested that the evidence for no group differences on the threshold and identification tests was inconclusive. In contrast, there was some evidence for no group differences on perceived edibility (BF01 = 2.69) and perceived intensity (BF01 = 2.80). These results do not provide conclusive evidence for or against differences between ASD and healthy controls on olfactory abilities. However, they suggest that there are no apparent group differences in subjective ratings of odors.

  • 2.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Alcohol consumption in very old age and its association with survival: A matter of health and physical function2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 159, p. 240-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol consumption in very old age is increasing; yet, little is known about the personal and health-related characteristics associated with different levels of alcohol consumption and the association between alcohol consumption and survival among the oldest old. Methods: Nationally representative data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, ages 76-101; n=863) collected in 2010/2011 were used. Mortality was analyzed unti12014. Alcohol consumption was measured with questions about frequency and amount. Drinks per month were calculated and categorized as abstainer, light-to-moderate drinker (0.5-30 drinks/month) and heavy drinker (>30 drinks/month). Multinomial logistic regressions and Laplace regressions were performed. Results: Compared to light-to-moderate drinkers, abstainers had lower levels of education and more functional health problems, while heavy drinkers were more often men, had higher levels of education, and no serious health or functional problems. In models adjusted only for age and sex, abstainers died earlier than drinkers. Among light-to-moderate drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with longer survival, while among heavy drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with shorter survival. However, after adjusting for personal and health-related factors, estimates were lower and no longer statistically significant. Conclusions: The association between alcohol consumption and survival in very old age seems to have an inverse J-shape; abstention and heavy use is associated with shorter survival compared to light-to moderate drinking. To a large extent, differences in survival are due to differences in baseline health and physical function.

  • 3.
    Ahrén, Jennie C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Chiesa, F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Magnusson, C.
    Goodman, A.
    We are family - parents, siblings and eating disorders: Introducing the Stockholm Youth Cohort2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no 1, p. P-251-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Eating disorders (ED) are among the leading causes of disease burden, especially in women.

    Objectives: The overall aim is to explore role of parental social characteristics and family composition in the development of ED in adolescent males and females.

    Aims: We investigated associations of parental socioeconomic position, family type, number of siblings and half-siblings and history of psychiatric disease in parents with the incidence of eating disorders at age 12–23 years.

    Methods: The Stockholm Youth Cohort (N = 589,114) is a database created by record-linkage for all children and adolescents, 0–17 years, resident in Stockholm County during the period 2001–2007, their parents and siblings. Hazard rations were calculated using Cox regression. Cases of ED were identified in outpatient care.

    Results: A total of 3251 cases of ED (2971 females and 280 males) were recorded among 249,884 study subjects. There was an increased risk of ED in both male and female offspring of parents who had a history of alcohol and drug abuse or psychiatric ill-health. Higher parental education was a risk factors in females. Increasing number of full siblings had a protective effect (fully adjusted HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.87–0.96, per sibling) while increasing number of half-siblings appeared to increase risk of eating disorders in females.

    Conclusions: Risk factors for ED seem to differ between females and males. While parental psychiatric health is related to risk of ED in both sexes, family socioeconomic position and relationships within family appear to be of more importance for influencing risk of ED in females.

  • 4.
    Ahrén, Jennie C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Chiesa, Flaminia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dalman, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Goodman, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
    We are family - parents, siblings, and eating disorders in a prospective total-population study of 250,000 Swedish males and females2013In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, ISSN 0276-3478, E-ISSN 1098-108X, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 693-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We examined how parental characteristics and other aspects of family background were associated with the development of eating disorders (ED) in males and females.

    Method: We used register data and record linkage to create the prospective, total-population study the Stockholm Youth Cohort. This cohort comprises all children and adolescents who were ever residents in Stockholm County between 2001 and 2007, plus their parents and siblings. Individuals born between 1984 and 1995 (N = 249, 884) were followed up for ED from age 12 to end of 2007. We used Cox regression modeling to investigate how ED incidence was associated with family socioeconomic position, parental age, and family composition.

    Results: In total, 3,251 cases of ED (2,971 females; 280 males) were recorded. Higher parental education independently predicted a higher rate of ED in females [e.g., adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.69 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.02) for degree-level vs. elementary-level maternal education], but not in males [HR 0.73 (95% CI: 0.42, 1.28), p < 0.001 for gender interaction]. In females, an increasing number of full-siblings was associated with lower rate of ED [e.g., fully adjusted HR 0.92 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.97) per sibling], whereas an increasing number of half-siblings was associated with a higher rate [HR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.09) per sibling].

    Discussion: The effect of parental education on ED rate varies between males and females, whereas the effect of number of siblings varies according to whether they are full or half-siblings. A deeper understanding of these associations and their underlying mechanisms may provide etiological insights and inform the design of preventive interventions

  • 5.
    Ahrén-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    von Blixten, Nils
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Holmgren, Sven
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in severely ill patients with eating disorders2011In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The underlying pathophysiology of eating disorders (ED) is dependent on complex interactions between psychological, biological and social factors. The purpose of the present study was to examine a possible increase in cytokines indicating inflammation, as measured by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in ED patients, and to explore possible relationships between cytokines and self-reported personality traits. Methods: Female patients with severe ED (n = 26) were recruited consecutively from an inpatient clinic and were compared to age-matched healthy females (n = 12). Commercial ELISA tests developed for the measurement of serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were employed. Personality traits were measured using Karolinska Scales of Personality. Results: The patient group displayed increased levels of the cytokine TNF-α and a tendency towards increased IL-6 levels. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to examine possible relationships between levels of cytokines and personality traits. The results showed that IL-6 levels were positively related to both somatic and psychic anxiety and to aggression scales, such as irritability and suspicion. Increased levels of TNF-α, in turn, were significantly correlated with high scores on the depression-related anxiety scale Inhibition of Aggression. However, increased levels of cytokines in the ED group did not seem to be mainly associated with symptoms of depression. Conclusion: We cannot rule out the possibility that comorbid conditions in the group contribute to the higher cytokine values. Further studies need to explore the possible influence of cytokines on the severity of ED and whether this might be mediated or moderated by specific personality traits.

  • 6.
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    The experiences of mental health and well-being of Swedish children and youth with a focus on educational situations: Some results and reflections from a review of qualitative studies2010In: Trender i barns och ungdomars psykiska hälsa: Program & abstracts 12-14 april 2010, Stockholm: Kungliga vetenskapsakademien , 2010, p. 17-18Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice of including in reviews people’s experiences and perceptions, which are collected with non-experimental and qualitative studies, has been developed recently in the field of mental health studies. These approaches and methodologies have inspired the review of research on Swedish children and adolescents experiences of mental health and well being, with a focus on their educational situation, that was conducted as a part of a systematic review of research on School Learning and Mental health, performed by appointment of the Royal Academy of Sciences. The aim of the review was to gather testimonies that can give indications of the experiences of mental health and well being in this specific context. The results from the studies that were relevant for the aims of the review are structured in four themes: general views, protective factors, risk factors, individual factors. They are presented in a narrative synthesis, giving a particular weight to the direct and indirect report of children’s and adolescents’ own views. The adolescents defined mental health as emotional experiences, seen both as internal feelings and as relational feelings. Family, friends and educational environments as social and physical environments were perceived as determinants of mental health. A great number of feelings were related to school, both related to satisfaction and pain, in particular when the school attendance is presented as an obligation. Harassment and rejection at school, performance stress, worries about grades and future prospects could be threats against self-worth and self-esteem, while teachers that do not care could generate negative experiences. Various kind of stress could be described and various strategies to resist stressful situations: for instance emotional support, safety and involvement. The educational environments can be an arena for social, cognitive and emotional experiences, relationships and accomplishments that are enriching the individuals and increase their well being. General structural characteristics of the educational environments may also affect well being in different directions: performance, evaluation and feedback, freedom of choice and responsibility for the future may be perceived as a burden. The following reflections can be made: the experiences of children and adolescents change when they grow older, go through developmental processes and encounter different educational situations; the studies reporting views of younger children on the matters of this review were less well represented; the negative experiences may be expressed in rather cautious and non dramatic terms by younger children; there are unique contribution of the review of qualitative studies, but also several interesting correspondences with the results of the review of quantitative studies.

  • 7. Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Bergström, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindefors, Nils
    The use of the Internet in the treatment of anxiety disorders2005In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry, ISSN 0951-7367, E-ISSN 1473-6578, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 73-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Bergström, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holländare, Fredrik
    Carlbring, Per
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Internet-based self-help for depression: randomised controlled trial2005In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 187, no 5, p. 456-461Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Paxling, Bjorn
    Roch-Norlund, Pie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Östman, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Norgren, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Almlöv, Jonas
    Georen, Lisa
    Breitholtz, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Dahlin, Mats
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Carlbring, Per
    Silverberg, Farrell
    Internet-Based Psychodynamic versus Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial2012In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, ISSN 0033-3190, E-ISSN 1423-0348, Vol. 81, no 6, p. 344-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Guided Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in many trials and found to be effective in the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has also been treated with ICBT, but there are no controlled trials on guided Internet-based psychodynamic treatment (IPDT). Since there is preliminary support for psychodynamic treatment for GAD, we decided to test if a psychodynamically informed self-help treatment could be delivered via the Internet. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of IPDT for GAD and to compare against ICBT and a waiting list control group. Method: A randomized controlled superiority trial with individuals diagnosed with GAD comparing guided ICBT (n = 27) and IPDT (n = 27) against a no treatment waiting list control group (n = 27). The primary outcome measure was the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Results: While there were no significant between-group differences immediately after treatment on the main outcome measure, both IPDT and ICBT resulted in improvements with moderate to large within-group effect sizes at 3 and 18 months follow-up on the primary measure in the completer analyses. The differences against the control group, although smaller, were still significant for both PDT and CBT when conforming to the criteria of clinically significant improvement. The active treatments did not differ significantly. There was a significant group by time interaction regarding GAD symptoms, but not immediately after treatment. Conclusions: IPDT and ICBT both led to modest symptom reduction in GAD, and more research is needed.

  • 10.
    Andreasson, Anna N.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Schiller, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Contemplate your symptoms and re-evaluate your health2015In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 49, p. e38-e39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bodily signals and how these are interpreted affect self-ratings of health. It is thus reasonable that appraisals of health are affected by imminent exposures and disease primes. We aimed to investigate whether self-ratings of health are affected by a symptom rating and if changes are substantiated in persons who report more symptoms. We used data from 813 persons who completed a questionnaire daily for 21 consecutive days. The questionnaire included a one-item self-rating of health (“pre-SRH”; 1 = excellent, 7 = very poor), a subsequent 26-item rating of physical and mental symptoms and thereafter a second (identical) self-rating of health (“post-SRH”). Paired t-tests were used to test for differences between pre-SRH and post-SRH. Mixed effect regression models were used to calculate the interaction effect of pre-SRH and symptom score on post-SRH adjusted for gender, age and if the person had been working that day (13545 observations). SRH worsened significantly (p  <<.0001) after the symptom rating, from 2.72 pre-SRH (95%CI:−2.70–2.74) to 2.77 post-SRH (95%CI:2.75–2.79). There was a significant interaction between pre-SRH and symptoms on post-SRH so that persons who reported more symptoms changed their post-SRH rating to a higher degree than those who reported fewer symptoms, irrespective of their subjective health status. The results support the notion that subjective health perception is affected by focus of attention, and that the effect depends on level of symptoms.

  • 11.
    Anghammar, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psykologiska bedömningar inför arbete med föräldrar inom BUP2010Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Psykologiska bedömningar av föräldrar beskrivs sällan som en mer uttalad och tydlig del av arbetet inom barn- och ungdomspsykiatri, utan det är i hög grad ett underförstått arbetsområde. Syftet med den här undersökningen var att beskriva hur arbetet med psykologiska bedömningar av föräldrar konceptualiseras och praktiseras under det inledande skedet av behandlingskontakter inom BUP. Nio psykologer vid sju öppenvårdsmottagningar intervjuades och intervjuerna analyserades tematiskt. En viktig aspekt som framkommer i resultatet är hur det gemensamma arbetet mellan psykolog och förälder för att etablera en arbetsallians erbjuder goda möjligheter till psykologiska bedömningar av föräldern. Under arbetet med alliansen, och med alliansen som bas, kan olika former av systematik och modeller för psykologiska bedömningar tillämpas. Resultatet indikerar också att arbetsalliansens centrala betydelse för bedömningsarbetet är tydligt relaterad till organisationens påverkan på det arbetet, liksom till betydelsen av psykologisk kompetens vid arbete med psykologiska bedömningar av föräldrar.

  • 12.
    Arat, Arzu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Burström, Bo
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    ADHD medication in offspring of immigrants - does the income level of the country of parental origin matter?2018In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Child psychiatric treatment facilities vary greatly worldwide and are virtually non-existent in many low-income countries. One of the most common psychiatric disorders in childhood is ADHD, with an estimated prevalence of 3-5% in Sweden. Previous studies have shown a similar prevalence of ADHD in minority and majority children in Sweden and the UK. However, clinical studies demonstrated that children from immigrant families living in Sweden received less psychiatric care than those of native-born parents. We tested the hypothesis that the consumption of child psychiatric care in immigrant families would be determined by the availability of such treatment in the parents' country of origin. Patterns of medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were studied as a proxy for child psychiatric care.

    METHODS: This was a register study of dispensed stimulant medication during 2013-2014 in Swedish national birth cohorts from 1995-2009. The study population, consisting of nearly 1.4 million children, was divided by national income of the parental country of origin and whether the parents were native Swedes, European immigrants, non-European immigrants or a mixture. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios of having been dispensed at least one ADHD drug during 2013, with adjustments for gender, family status indicating whether the child is living with both parents, household income and area of residence.

    RESULTS: Having parents born in low-income (OR [95% confidence interval] 0.27 [0.24-0.29]) or middle-income (European: OR 0.23 [0.20-0.26], non-European: OR 0.39 [0.34-0.41]) countries was associated with lower ADHD treatment levels than having parents born in high-income countries (European: OR 0.60 [0.54-0.66], non-European: OR 0.68 [0.59-0.79]), when compared to children of parents born in Sweden. In families with a background in low or middle income countries, there was no significant association between household income and ADHD medication, while in children with Swedish and mixed backgrounds high level of disposable income was associated with lower levels of ADHD medication.

    CONCLUSION: The use of child psychiatric care by immigrant families in Sweden was largely associated with the income level of the country of origin.

  • 13. Arentsen, T.
    et al.
    Qian, Y.
    Gkotzis, Spyridon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Femenia, T.
    Wang, T.
    Udekwu, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Forssberg, H.
    Heijtz, R. Diaz
    The bacterial peptidoglycan-sensing molecule Pglyrp2 modulates brain development and behavior2017In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 257-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have revealed that the gut microbiota modulates brain development and behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we show that bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) derived from the commensal gut microbiota can be translocated into the brain and sensed by specific pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) of the innate immune system. Using expression-profiling techniques, we demonstrate that two families of PRRs that specifically detect PGN (that is, PGN-recognition proteins and NOD-like receptors), and the PGN transporter PepT1 are highly expressed in the developing brain during specific windows of postnatal development in both males and females. Moreover, we show that the expression of several PGN-sensing molecules and PepT1 in the developing striatum is sensitive to manipulations of the gut microbiota (that is, germ-free conditions and antibiotic treatment). Finally, we used the PGN-recognition protein 2 (Pglyrp2) knockout mice to examine the potential influence of PGN-sensing molecules on brain development and behavior. We demonstrate that the absence of Pglyrp2 leads to alterations in the expression of the autism risk gene c-Met, and sex-dependent changes in social behavior, similar to mice with manipulated microbiota. These findings suggest that the central activation of PRRs by microbial products could be one of the signaling pathways mediating the communication between the gut microbiota and the developing brain.

  • 14.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gudmundsdóttir, Ragnhildur
    Butwicka, Agnieszka
    Fang, Fang
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Hultman, Christina M.
    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur A.
    Psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in Swedish survivors of the 2004 southeast Asia tsunami: a 5 year matched cohort study2015In: Lancet psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0374, E-ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 817-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Survivors of natural disasters are thought to be at an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, however the extent of this risk, and whether it is linked to pre-existing psychopathology, is not known. We aimed to establish whether Swedish survivors of tsunamis from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake had increased risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts 5 years after repatriation.

    Methods: We identified Swedish survivors repatriated from southeast Asia (8762 adults and 3742 children) and 864 088 unexposed adults and 320 828 unexposed children matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status. We retrieved psychiatric diagnoses and suicide attempts from the Swedish patient register for the 5 years after the tsunami (from Dec 26, 2004, to Jan 31, 2010) and estimated hazard ratios (HRs), then adjusted for pre-tsunami psychiatric disorders, and, for children, for parental pre-tsunami disorders.

    Findings: Exposed adults were more likely than unexposed adults to receive any psychiatric diagnosis (547 [6.2%] vs 47 734 [5.5%]; adjusted HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.11-1.32), particularly stress-related disorders (187 [2.1%] vs 8831 [1.0%]; 2.27, 1.96-2.62) and suicide attempts (38 [0.43%] vs 2752 [0.32%]; 1.54, 1.11-2.13), but not mood or anxiety disorders. Risk of psychiatric diagnoses did not differ between exposed and unexposed children and adolescents (248 [6.6] vs 22 081 [6.9%]; 0.98, 0.86-1.11), although exposed children and adolescents had a higher risk for suicide attempts with uncertain intent (1.43; 1.01-2.02) and stress-related disorders (1.79; 1.30-2.46), mainly during the first 3 months after the tsunami.

    Interpretation: The 2004 tsunami was, independently of previous psychiatric morbidity, associated with an increased risk of severe psychopathology, mainly stress-related disorders and suicide attempts, in children and adults. Survivors of natural disasters should be targeted with early interventions and active long-term follow-up to prevent, detect, and alleviate psychiatric disorders that might follow.

    Funding: The Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, Swedish Society for Medical Research.

  • 15.
    Arnberg, Filip K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Michel, Per-Olof
    Lundin, Tom
    Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e0119732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Posttraumatic stress (PTS) is common in survivors from life-threatening events. Little is known, however, about the course of PTS after life threat in the absence of collateral stressors (e.g., bereavement, social stigma, property loss) and there is a scarcity of studies about PTS in the long term. This study assessed the short- and long-term course of PTS, and the influence of gender, education and age on the level and course of PTS, in survivors from a non-fatal airliner emergency landing caused by engine failure at an altitude of 1 km. There were 129 persons on board. A survey including the Impact of Event Scale was distributed to 106 subjects after 1 month, 4 months, 14 months, and 25 months, and to 95 subjects after 19 years (response rates 64-83%). There were initially high levels of PTS. The majority of changes in PTS occurred from 1 to 4 months after the event. There were small changes from 4 to 25 months but further decrease in PTS thereafter. Female gender was associated with higher levels of PTS whereas gender was unrelated to the slope of the short- and long-term trajectories. Higher education was related to a quicker recovery although not to initial or long-term PTS. Age was not associated with PTS. The present findings suggest that a life-threatening experience without collateral stressors may produce high levels of acute posttraumatic stress, yet with a benign prognosis. The findings further implicate that gender is unrelated to trajectories of recovery in the context of highly similar exposure and few collateral stressors.

  • 16.
    Barclay, Kieron
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. London School of Economics and Political Science, UK; Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
    Myrskylä, Mikko
    Tynelius, Per
    Berglind, Daniel
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Birth order and hospitalization for alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 167, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have shown that birth order is an important predictor of later life health as well as socioeconomic attainment. In this study, we examine the relationship between birth order and hospitalization for alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden. Methods: We study the relationship between birth order and hospitalization related to alcohol and narcotics use before and after the age of 20 using Swedish register data for cohorts born 1987-1994. We apply Cox proportional hazard models and use sibling fixed effects, eliminating confounding by factors shared by the siblings. Results: Before age 20 we find that later born siblings are hospitalized for alcohol use at a higher rate than first-borns, and there is a monotonic increase in the hazard of hospitalization with increasing birth order. Second-borns are hospitalized at a rate 47% higher than first-borns, and third-borns at a rate 65% higher. Similar patterns are observed for hospitalization for narcotics use. After age 20 the pattern is similar, but the association is weaker. These patterns are consistent across various sibling group sizes. Conclusions: Later born siblings are more likely to be hospitalized for both alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden. These birth order effects are substantial in size, and larger than the estimated sex differences for the risk of hospitalization related to alcohol and drug use before age 20, and previous estimates for socioeconomic status differences in alcohol and drug abuse.

  • 17. Barnevik Olsson, Martina
    et al.
    Holm, Anette
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lundholm Hedvall, Åsa
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Children with borderline intellectual functioning and autism spectrum disorder: developmental trajectories from 4 to 11 years of age2017In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, ISSN 1176-6328, E-ISSN 1178-2021, Vol. 13, p. 2519-2526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies on autism have tended to focus either on those with intellectual disability (ie, those with intellectual quotient [IQ] under 70) or on the group that is referred to as high-functioning, that is, those with borderline, average or above average IQ. The literature on cognition and daily functioning in autism spectrum disorder combined specifically with borderline intellectual functioning (IQ 70-84) is limited. Methods: From a representative group of 208 preschool children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, those 50 children in the group with borderline intellectual functioning at ages 4.5-6.5 years were targeted for follow-up at a median age of 10 years. A new cognitive test was carried out in 30 children. Parents were interviewed with a semi-structured interview together with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (n=41) and the Autism-Tics, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and other comorbidities inventory (A-TAC) (n=36). Results: Most children of interviewed parents presented problems within several developmental areas. According to A-TAC and the clinical interview, there were high rates of attention deficits and difficulties with regulating activity level and impulsivity. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales composite scores showed that at school age, a majority of the children had declined since the previous assessment at ages between 4.5 and 6.5 years. Almost half the tested group had shifted in their IQ level, to below 70 or above 84. Conclusion: None of the children assessed was without developmental/neuropsychiatric problems at school-age follow-up. The results support the need for comprehensive follow-up of educational, medical and developmental/neuropsychiatric needs, including a retesting of cognitive functions. There is also a need for continuing parent/family follow-up and support.

  • 18. Barnevik Olsson, Martina
    et al.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lundstrom, Sebastian
    Giacobini, MaiBritt
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Recovery from the diagnosis of autism - and then?2015In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, ISSN 1176-6328, E-ISSN 1178-2021, Vol. 11, p. 999-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to follow up the 17 children, from a total group of 208 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who recovered from autism. They had been clinically diagnosed with ASD at or under the age of 4 years. For 2 years thereafter they received intervention based on applied behavior analysis. These 17 children were all of average or borderline intellectual functioning. On the 2-year follow-up assessment, they no longer met criteria for ASD. Methods: At about 10 years of age they were targeted for a new follow-up. Parents were given a semistructured interview regarding the child's daily functioning, school situation, and need of support, and were interviewed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) and the Autism - Tics, Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) telephone interview. Results: The vast majority of the children had moderate-to-severe problems with attention/activity regulation, speech and language, behavior, and/or social interaction. A majority of the children had declined in their VABS scores. Most of the 14 children whose parents were A-TAC-interviewed had problems within many behavioral A-TAC domains, and four (29%) had symptom levels corresponding to a clinical diagnosis of ASD, AD/HD, or both. Another seven children (50%) had pronounced subthreshold indicators of ASD, AD/HD, or both. Conclusion: Children diagnosed at 2-4 years of age as suffering from ASD and who, after appropriate intervention for 2 years, no longer met diagnostic criteria for the disorder, clearly needed to be followed up longer. About 3-4 years later, they still had major problems diagnosable under the umbrella term of ESSENCE (Early Symptomatic Syndromes Eliciting Neurodevelopmental Clinical Examinations). They continued to be in need of support, educationally, from a neurodevelopmental and a medical point of view. According to parent interview data, a substantial minority of these children again met diagnostic criteria for ASD.

  • 19. Been, Frederic
    et al.
    Bifisma, Lubertus
    Benaglia, Lisa
    Berset, Jean-Daniel
    Botero-Coy, Ana M.
    Castiglioni, Sara
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Zobel, Frank
    Schaub, Michael P.
    Buecheli, Alexander
    Hernandez, Felix
    Delemont, Olivier
    Esseiva, Pierre
    Ort, Christoph
    Assessing geographical differences in illicit drug consumption-A comparison of results from epidemiological and wastewater data in Germany and Switzerland2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 161, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wastewater analysis is an innovative approach that allows monitoring illicit drug use at the community level. This study focused on investigating geographical differences in drug consumption by comparing epidemiological, crime and wastewater data. Methods: Wastewater samples were collected in 19 cities across Germany and Switzerland during one week, covering a population of approximately 8.1 million people. Self-report data and consumption offences for the investigated areas were used for comparison and to investigate differences between the indicators. Results: Good agreement between data sources was observed for cannabis and amphetamine-type stimulants, whereas substantial discrepancies were observed for cocaine. In Germany, an important distinction could be made between Berlin, Dortmund and Munich, where cocaine and particularly amphetamine were more prevalent, and Dresden, where methamphetamine consumption was clearly predominant. Cocaine consumption was relatively homogenous in the larger urban areas of Switzerland, although prevalence and offences data suggested a more heterogeneous picture. Conversely, marked regional differences in amphetamine and methamphetamine consumption could be highlighted. Conclusions: Combining the available data allowed for a better understanding of the geographical differences regarding prevalence, typology and amounts of substances consumed. For cannabis and amphetamine-type stimulants, the complementarity of survey, police and wastewater data could be highlighted, although notable differences could be identified when considering more stigmatised drugs (i.e. cocaine and heroin). Understanding illicit drug consumption at the national scale remains a difficult task, yet this research illustrates the added value of combining complementary data sources to obtain a more comprehensive and accurate picture of the situation.

  • 20. Bejerot, Susanne
    et al.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Humble, Mats B.
    Subcortical brain volume differences in participants with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adults2017In: Lancet psychiatry, ISSN 2215-0374, E-ISSN 2215-0366, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 437-437Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bergmark, Karin H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Internet addiction - vad är det?2016In: Tidskriften för svensk psykiatri, ISSN 1653-8579, no 1, p. 59-60Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22. Berman, Anne H.
    et al.
    Biguet, Gabriele
    Stathakarou, Natalia
    Westin-Hägglöf, Beata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jeding, Kerstin
    McGrath, Cormac
    Zary, Nabil
    Kononowicz, Andrzej A.
    Virtual Patients in a Behavioral Medicine Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Participants' Perceptions2017In: Academic Psychiatry, ISSN 1042-9670, E-ISSN 1545-7230, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 631-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The purpose of this article is to explore learners' perceptions of using virtual patients in a behavioral medicine Massive Open Online Course (MOOCs) and thereby describe innovative ways of disseminating knowledge in health-related areas. Methods A 5-week MOOC on behavioral medicine was hosted on the edX platform. The authors developed two branched virtual patients consisting of video recordings of a live standardized patient, with multiple clinical decision points and narration unfolding depending on learners' choices. Students interacted with the virtual patients to treat stress and sleep problems. Answers to the exit survey and participant comments from the discussion forum were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results In total, 19,236 participants enrolled in the MOOC, out of which 740 received the final certificate. The virtual patients were completed by 2317 and 1640 participants respectively. Among survey respondents (n = 442), 83.1% agreed that the virtual patient exercise was helpful. The qualitative analysis resulted in themes covering what it was like to work with the virtual patient, with subthemes on learner-centered education, emotions/eustress, game comparisons, what the participants learned, what surprised them, how confident participants felt about applying interventions in practice, suggestions for improvement, and previous experiences of virtual patients. Conclusions Students were enthusiastic about interacting with the virtual patients as a means to apply new knowledge about behavioral medicine interventions. The most common suggestion was to incorporate more interactive cases with various levels of complexity. Further research should include patient outcomes and focus on interprofessional aspects of learning with virtual patients in a MOOC.

  • 23. Bjaastad, Jon Fauskanger
    et al.
    Haugland, Bente Storm Mowatt
    Fjermestad, Krister W.
    Torsheim, Torbjorn
    Havik, Odd E.
    Heiervang, Einar R.
    Öst, Lars-Goran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Competence and Adherence Scale for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CAS-CBT) for Anxiety Disorders in Youth: Psychometric Properties2016In: Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1040-3590, E-ISSN 1939-134X, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 908-916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Competence and Adherence Scale for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CAS-CBT). The CAS-CBT is an 11-item scale developed to measure adherence and competence in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders in youth. A total of 181 videotapes from the treatment sessions in a randomized controlled effectiveness trial (Wergeland et al., 2014) comprising youth (N = 182, M age = 11.5 years, SD = 2.1, range 8-15 years, 53% girls, 90.7% Caucasian) with mixed anxiety disorders were assessed with the CAS-CBT to investigate interitem correlations, internal consistency, and factor structure. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach's alpha = .87). Factor analysis suggested a 2-factor solution with Factor 1 representing CBT structure and session goals (explaining 46.9% of the variance) and Factor 2 representing process and relational skills (explaining 19.7% of the variance). The sum-score for adherence and competence was strongly intercorrelated, r = .79, p < .001. Novice raters (graduate psychology students) obtained satisfactory accuracy (ICC > .40, n = 10 videotapes) and also good to excellent interrater reliability when compared to expert raters (ICC = .83 for adherence and .64 for competence, n = 26 videotapes). High rater stability was also found (n = 15 videotapes). The findings suggest that the CAS-CBT is a reliable measure of adherence and competence in manualized CBT for anxiety disorders in youth. Further research is needed to investigate the validity of the scale and psychometric properties when used with other treatment programs, disorders and treatment formats.

  • 24. Björkenstam, C.
    et al.
    Bjorkenstam, E.
    Ljung, R.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Tuvblad, C.
    Suicidal behavior among delinquent former child welfare clients2013In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 349-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Child welfare clients represent a high-risk group for delinquency and adult criminality, but also for future suicidal behavior. We examine associations between delinquency and suicidal behavior in a national child welfare population. This register-based cohort study is based on data for all Swedish former child welfare clients born between 1972 and 1981 that experienced interventions before their adolescent years. We followed 27,228 individuals from age 20 years until 31 December 2006. Juvenile delinquency was defined as being convicted of at least one crime between age 15 and 19. The risk of suicidal behavior was calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Fifteen percent of the women and 40 % of the men had at least one conviction between the age 15 and 19. The adjusted risk of suicidal behavior among women with five or more convictions was 3.5 (95 % CI 2.0-6.2); corresponding IRR for men was 3.9 (95 % CI 3.1-4.9). Child welfare experience-specifically of out-of-home care-in combination with delinquency is a potent risk factor for suicidal behavior among young adults. However, we cannot exclude that some of this association is an epiphenomenon of uncontrolled confounders, such as impulsivity or severity of psychiatric disease. Despite this caveat, results should be disseminated to practitioners in the health and correction services.

  • 25. Björkenstam, C.
    et al.
    Björkenstam, E.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Boden, R.
    Reutfors, J.
    Suicide in first episode psychosis: A nationwide cohort study2014In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 157, no 1-3, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Relatively little is known about suicide in diagnostic subtypes of first episode psychosis (FEP). Our aim was to assess suicide rates and potential risk factors for suicide in FEP. Methods: This is a national register-based cohort study of patients born in 1973-1978 in Sweden and who were hospitalized with a FEP between ages 15 and 30 years (n = 2819). The patients were followed from date of discharge until death, emigration, or 31st of December 2008. The suicide rates for six diagnostic subtypes of FEP were calculated. Suicide incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated to evaluate the association between suicide and psychiatric, familial, social, and demographic factors. Results: In total 121 patients died by suicide. The overall suicide rate was 4.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-5.0) per 1000 person-years. The highest suicide rates were found in depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms and in delusional disorder. In an adjustedmodel, the strongest risk factors for suicide were self-harm (IRR 2.7, CI 1.7-4.4) or a conviction for violent crime (IRR 2.0, CI 1.3-3.2). Also having a first-degree relative with a schizophrenia/bipolar diagnosis (IRR 2.1, CI 1.2-3.6) or substance use disorder (IRR 2.0, CI 1.2-3.2) were significant risk factors for suicide. Conclusions: Impulsive behavior such as self-harm as well as having a family history of severe mental disorder or substance use are important risk factors for suicide in FEP.

  • 26.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. University of California, USA; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Björkenstam, Emma
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Cochran, Susan
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Anxiety and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women and Men in Sweden: Is the Risk Equally Spread Within the Sexual Minority Population?2017In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 396-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Sexual minority individuals have a higher risk of anxiety and depression compared with heterosexuals. However, whether the higher risk is spread equally across the sexual minority population is not clear.

    Aim

    To investigate the association between sexual orientation and self-reported current anxiety and a history of diagnosis of depression, paying particular attention to possible subgroup differences in risks within the sexual minority population, stratified by sex and to examine participants' history of medical care for anxiety disorders and depression.

    Methods

    We conducted a population-based study of 874 lesbians and gays, 841 bisexuals, and 67,980 heterosexuals recruited in 2010 in Stockholm County. Data were obtained from self-administered surveys that were linked to nationwide registers. Main Outcome Measures: By using logistic regression, we compared risks of current anxiety, histories of diagnosed depression, and register-based medical care for anxiety and/or depression in lesbian and gay, bisexual, and heterosexual individuals.

    Results

    Bisexual women and gay men were more likely to report anxiety compared with their heterosexual peers. Bisexual individuals and gay men also were more likely to report a past diagnosis of depression. All sexual minority groups had an increased risk of having used medical care for anxiety and depression compared with heterosexuals, with bisexual women having the highest risk.

    Conclusion

    Bisexual women appear to be a particularly vulnerable sexual minority group. Advocating for nondiscrimination and protections for lesbian, gay, and bisexual people is a logical extension of the effort to lower the prevalence of mental illness.

  • 27.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; University of California, USA.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Berlin, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Björkenstam, Emma
    Suicide risk and suicide method in patients with personality disorders2016In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 83, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The influence of psychopathology on suicide method has revealed different distributions among different psychiatric disorders. However, evidence is still scarce. We hypothesized that having a diagnosis of personality disorder (PD) affect the suicide method, and that different PD clusters would influence the suicide method in different ways. In addition, we hypothesized that the presence of psychiatric and somatic co-morbidity also affects the suicide method. Method: We examined 25,217 individuals aged 15-64 who had been hospitalized in Sweden with a main diagnosis of PD the years 1987-2013 (N = 25,217). The patients were followed from the date of first discharge until death or until the end of the follow-up period, i.e. December 31, 2013, for a total of 323,508.8 person-years, with a mean follow up time of 11.7 years. The SMR, i.e. the ratio between the observed number of suicides and the expected number of suicides, was used as a measure of risk. Results: Overall PD, different PD-clusters, and comorbidity influenced the suicide method. Hanging evidenced highest SMR in female PD patients (SMR 34.2 (95% CI: 29.3-39.8)), as compared to non-PD patients and jumping among male PD patients (SMR 24.8 (95% CI: 18.3-33.6)), as compared to non PD-patients. Furthermore, the elevated suicide risk was related to both psychiatric and somatic comorbidity. Conclusion: The increased suicide risk was unevenly distributed with respect to suicide method and type of PD. However, these differences were only moderate and greatly overshadowed by the overall excess suicide risk in having PD. Any attempt from society to decrease the suicide rate in persons with PD must take these characteristics into account.

  • 28.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; University of California, USA.
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Björkenstam, Emma
    Childhood adversity and risk of suicide: cohort study of 548 721 adolescents and young adults in Sweden2017In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 357, article id j1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To examine the relation between childhood adversity, the role of school performance, and childhood psychopathology and the risk of suicide. DESIGN Cohort study of register based indicators of childhood adversity (at ages 0-14) including death in the family (suicide analysed separately), parental substance abuse, parental psychiatric disorder, substantial parental criminality, parental separation/single parent household, receipt of public assistance, and residential instability. SETTING Swedish medical birth register and various Swedish population based registers. PARTICIPANTS 548 721 individuals born 1987-91. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Estimates of suicide risk at ages 15-24 calculated as incidence rate ratios adjusted for time at risk and confounders. Results Adjusted incidence rate ratios for the relation between childhood adversity and suicide during adolescence and young adulthood ranged from 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.4) for residential instability to 2.9 (1.4 to 5.9) for suicide in the family. There was a dose-response relation between accumulating childhood adversity and risk: 1.1 (0.9 to 1.4) for those exposed to one adversity and 1.9 (1.4 to 2.5) and 2.6 (1.9 to 3.4) for those exposed to two and three or more adversities, respectively. The association with increased risk of suicide remained even after adjustment for school performance and childhood psychopathology. CONCLUSION Childhood adversity is a risk factor for suicide in adolescence and young adulthood, particularly accumulated adversity. These results emphasise the importance of understanding the social mechanisms of suicide and the need for effective interventions early in life, aiming to alleviate the risk in disadvantaged children.

  • 29. Björkenstam, E.
    et al.
    Björkenstam, C.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Reutfors, J.
    Bodén, R.
    A five year diagnostic follow-up of 1840 patients after a first episode non-schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis2013In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    It is not clear which patients with a first psychotic episode will develop schizophrenia. We performed a diagnostic follow-up of patients treated for a first time non-affective, non-schizophrenia psychosis and explored potential predictors of a subsequent schizophrenia or schizoaffective diagnosis.

    Methods

    This register-based cohort study comprises individuals born between 1973 and 1978 in Sweden, with a first hospital-treated psychosis excluding schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms (n = 1840). The patients were followed for five years regarding subsequent diagnoses. Psychiatric, social, family history of psychiatric illness, premorbid intellectual level, head injuries and obstetrical complications were investigated by logistic regression as predictors of schizophrenia or schizoaffective diagnosis.

    Results

    During the follow-up, 18% were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, 5% were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, whereas 29% were not re-admitted to a psychiatric clinic. Patients with a first-degree relative hospitalized for schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder had an increased risk of subsequent diagnosis for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (odds ratio 1.9 and 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 3.0)), whereas previous severe criminality was associated with a decreased risk (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.3–0.8).

    Conclusion

    Diagnostic outcome was diverse after a first non-schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. Family history of severe mental illness and no previous conviction for severe criminality were the strongest risk factors for a future schizophrenia or schizoaffective diagnosis.

  • 30. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Burström, Bo
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Childhood adversity and psychiatric disorder in young adulthood: An analysis of 107,704 Swedes2016In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 77, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood adversity (CA) is associated with increased risks of psychiatric disorder in young adulthood, but details in this association are less known. We aimed to explore the association of a range of CA indicators with psychiatric disorder in young adulthood, and the impact of age at exposure, disorder type and accumulation of indicators. We capitalized on Sweden's extensive and high-quality registers and analyzed a cohort of all Swedes (N = 107,704) born in Stockholm County 1987-1991. Adversities included familial death, parental substance misuse and psychiatric disorder, parental criminality, parental separation, public assistance recipiency and residential instability. Age at exposure was categorized as: 0-6.9 years (infancy and early childhood), 7-11.9 years (middle childhood), and 12-14 years (early adolescence). Psychiatric disorders after age 15 were defined from ICD codes through registers. Risks were calculated as Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results showed that exposure to at least one CA was associated with an increased risk of psychiatric disorder (HR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3-1.4). Risks were increased for mood, anxiety, and psychotic disorders and ADHD but not for eating disorders. The risk varied with type of disorder but was similar for all exposure periods. Individuals with multiple (3+) CAs had a two-fold risk of psychiatric disorder (HR 2.0, 95% CI: 1.9-2.1). In conclusion, our findings support the long-term negative impact of CA on mental health, regardless of developmental period of exposure. Given that experience of CA is common, efforts should be put to alleviate the burden of childhood adversities for children, particularly among the most disadvantaged.

  • 31. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Björkenstam, Charlotte
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Association of Cumulative Childhood Adversity and Adolescent Violent Offending With Suicide in Early Adulthood2018In: JAMA psychiatry, ISSN 2168-6238, E-ISSN 2168-622X, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Childhood adversity (CA) is associated with an increased risk of suicide in young adulthood that might be explained by maladaptive trajectories during adolescence. Although adolescent violent offending is linked with suicide, little is known about its role in the association between CA and suicide. OBJECTIVE To examine whether adolescent violent offending mediates the association between CA and suicide in early adulthood. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This population-based, longitudinal cohort study with a follow-up time spanning 5 to 9 years included 476 103 individuals born in Sweden between 1984 and 1988. The study population was prospectively followed up from 20 years of age until December 31, 2013, with respect to suicide. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 1984, to December 31, 2013. EXPOSURES Register-based CAs included parental death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric disorder, parental criminal offending, parental separation, public assistance recipiency, child welfare intervention, and residential instability. Adolescent violent offending was defined as being convicted of a violent crime between the ages of 15 and 19 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Estimates of risk of suicide after 20 years of age (from 2004 if born in 1984 and from 2008 if born in 1988) until the end of 2013 were calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% CIs using Poisson regression analysis. Adjustments were made for demographics and psychiatric disorder. In addition, binary mediation analysis with logistic regression was used. RESULTS A total of 476 103 individuals (231 699 [48.7%] female) were included in the study. Those with a conviction for violent offending had been exposed to all CAs to a greater extent than those with no violent offending. Cumulative CA was associated with risk of suicide in nonconvicted (adjusted IRR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.5-3.9) and convicted youths, who had a higher risk of suicide (adjusted IRR, 8.5; 95% CI, 4.6-15.7). Adolescent violent offending partly mediated the association between CA and suicide. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Individuals with a history of CA who also engage in violent offending in adolescence have a high risk of suicide. Interventions to prevent externalizing behavior during childhood and increased support to youths with delinquent behavior may have the potential to prevent suicide related to CA.

  • 32. Björkenstam, Emma
    et al.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Impact of childhood adversities on depression in early adulthood: A longitudinal cohort study of 478,141 individuals in Sweden2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 223, p. 95-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although the relationship between childhood adversity (CA) and depression is widely accepted, there is little information on what proportion of depression is attributable to CA. Method: We used a Swedish cohort of 478,141 individuals born in 1984-1988 in Sweden. Register-based CA indicators included parental death, parental substance abuse and psychiatric morbidity, parental criminality, parental separation, public assistance recipiency, child welfare intervention, and residential instability. Estimates of risk of depression, measured as retrieval of prescribed antidepressants and/or psychiatric care with a clinical diagnosis of depression, between 2006 and 2012 were calculated as Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using a Cox regression analysis. Results: All CAs predicted depression in early adulthood. Furthermore, the predictive association between the CA indicators and depression was graded, with highest HRs observed for 4+ CAs (HR: 3.05 (95% CI 2.83-3.29)) for a clinical diagnosis for depression and HR: 1.32 (95% CI 1.25-1.41) for antidepressant medication after adjustments were made for important confounding factors. Of the studied CAs, child welfare intervention entailed highest HR for depression. Conclusion: Regardless of causality issues, children and youth with a history of multiple CA should be regarded as a high-risk group for depression by professionals in social, and health service's that come into contact with this group.

  • 33.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Barn i utsatta miljöer och livssituationer2009In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Socialmedicinsk forskning på KI, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artikeln är baserad på ett projekt om barn i utsatta miljöer och livssituationer. Resultaten har publiverats i en bok, en antologi, med fem författare. Utgångspunkten är barnkonventionen.

  • 34. Bülow, Per
    et al.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Denhov, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Sweden.
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Research and Development Unit, Psychiatry South Stockholm, Sweden; University of Agder, Norway.
    Experience of Psychotropic Medication - An Interview Study of Persons with Psychosis2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 820-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotropic drugs, particularly antipsychotic types, are a cornerstone of the treatment of people with psychosis. Despite numerous studies showing that drug treatment with psychotropic drugs initially alleviates psychiatric symptoms, the proportion of people with mental health problems and symptoms that do not follow doctors' prescriptions, thus exhibiting so-called non-adherence, is considerable. Non-adherence is predominantly seen as a clinical feature and as a patient characteristic that is especially due to patients' poor understanding that they are ill. There is also a widespread notion that non-adherence is of great disadvantage to the patient. This article is based on interviews with 19 persons diagnosed with psychosis. It challenges the notion of patients being either adherent or non-adherent to the doctor's orders. The findings show that persons with psychosis are active agents when it comes to adjusting medication. The interviewees created their own strategies to gain power over treatment with psychotropic drugs. The most common strategies were to adjust the doses or take breaks of varying lengths from the medication. These deviations from prescriptions were important to conceal, not only from their own psychiatrists, but from all psychiatric staff.

  • 35.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hägglund, Malin
    Umeå universitet.
    Luthström, Anne
    Umeå universitet.
    Dahlin, Mats
    Kadowaki, Åsa
    Vernmark, Kristofer
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet/Karolinska Institutet.
    Internet-based behavioral activation and acceptance-based treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial2013In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 148, no 2-3, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for depression has been tested in several trials but there are no internet studies on behavioral activation (BA), and no studies on BA over the internet including components of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). The aim of this study was to develop and test the effects of internet-delivered BA combined with ACT against a waiting list control condition as a first test of the effects of treatment.

    Methods

    Selection took place with a computerized screening interview and a subsequent semi-structured telephone interview. A total of 80 individuals from the general public were randomized to one of two conditions. The treatment lasted for 8 weeks after which both groups were assessed. We also included a 3 month follow-up. The treatment included interactive elements online and a CD-ROM for mindfulness and acceptance exercises. In addition, written support and feedback was given by a therapist every week.

    Results

    Results at posttreatment showed a large between group effect size on the Beck Depression inventory IId=0.98 (95%CI=0.51–1.44). In the treated group 25% (10/40) reached remission defined as a BDI score≤10 vs. 5% (2/40) in the control group. Results on secondary measures were smaller. While few dropped out from the study (N=2) at posttreatment, the average number of completed modules was M=5.1 out of the seven modules.

    Limitations

    The study only included a waiting-list comparison and it is not possible to determine which treatment components were the most effective.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that there is initial evidence that BA with components of ACT can be effective in reducing symptoms of depression.

  • 36. Clerici, Francesca
    et al.
    Caracciolo, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Cova, Ilaria
    Fusari Imperatori, Susanna
    Maggiore, Laura
    Galimberti, Daniela
    Scarpini, Elio
    Mariani, Claudio
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Does Vascular Burden Contribute to the Progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia?2012In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, ISSN 1420-8008, E-ISSN 1421-9824, Vol. 34, no 3-4, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the contribution of vascular risk factors (VRFs), vascular diseases (VDs) and white matter lesions (WMLs) to the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods: Two hundred forty-five consecutive subjects with MCI (age 74.09 ± 6.92 years) were followed for an average of 2.4 years. The Hachinski Ischemic Score and the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile were used to summarize VRFs and VDs. WMLs were graded using the Age-Related White Matter Changes Scale. Results: One hundred twenty-nine (52.6%) out of 245 subjects at risk converted to dementia, including 87 cases of AD. When hypertension occurred in MCI with deep WMLs, a 1.8-fold increased risk of dementia was observed (95% CI = 1.0–3.4). When deep WMLs occurred in MCI with high scores (≥4) on the Hachinski scale, a 3.5-fold (95% CI = 1.6–7.4) and 3.8-fold (95% CI = 1.2–11.5) risk of progression to dementia and AD was observed, respectively. Analogously, the joint effect of WMLs and high scores (≥14) on the Framingham scale nearly doubled the risk of dementia (hazard ratio = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1–3.3). Conclusions: Accelerated progression of MCI to dementia and AD is to be expected when VRFs and VDs occur together with WMLs.

  • 37.
    Clinton, David N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences.
    Eating disorders: diagnosis and treatment expectations1994Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 38. Damian, M.
    et al.
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Single-Domain Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment Identified by Cluster Analysis Predicts Alzheimer's Disease in the European Prospective DESCRIPA Study2013In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, ISSN 1420-8008, E-ISSN 1421-9824, Vol. 36, no 1-2, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: To identify prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects using a data-driven approach to determine cognitive profiles in mild cognitive impairment (MCI).Methods: A total of 881 MCI subjects were recruited from 20 memory clinics and followed for up to 5 years. Outcome measures included cognitive variables, conversion to AD, and biomarkers (e.g. CSF, and MRI markers). Two hierarchical cluster analyses (HCA) were performed to identify clusters of subjects with distinct cognitive profiles. The first HCA included all subjects with complete cognitive data, whereas the second one selected subjects with very mild MCI (MMSE ≥28). ANOVAs and ANCOVAs were computed to examine whether the clusters differed with regard to conversion to AD, and to AD-specific biomarkers. Results: The HCAs identified 4-cluster solutions that best reflected the sample structure. One cluster (aMCIsingle) had a significantly higher conversion rate (19%), compared to subjective cognitive impairment (SCI, p < 0.0001), and non-amnestic MCI (naMCI, p = 0.012). This cluster was the only one showing a significantly different biomarker profile (Aβ42, t-tau, APOE ε4, and medial temporal atrophy), compared to SCI or naMCI. Conclusion: In subjects with mild MCI, the single-domain amnestic MCI profile was associated with the highest risk of conversion, even if memory impairment did not necessarily cross specific cut-off points. A cognitive profile characterized by isolated memory deficits may be sufficient to warrant applying prevention strategies in MCI, whether or not memory performance lies below specific z-scores. This is supported by our preliminary biomarker analyses. However, further analyses with bigger samples are needed to corroborate these findings.

  • 39. Danielsson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Falkstedt, Daniel
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Allebeck, Peter
    Agardh, Emilie
    Cannabis use among Swedish men in adolescence and the risk of adverse life course outcomes: results from a 20 year-follow-up study2015In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 1794-1802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo examine associations between cannabis use in adolescence (at age 18) and unemployment and social welfare assistance in adulthood (at age 40) among Swedish men. DesignLongitudinal cohort study. Setting and ParticipantsA total of 49321 Swedish men born in 1949-51, who were conscripted to compulsory military service at 18-20 years of age. MeasurementsAll men answered two detailed questionnaires at conscription and were subject to examinations of physical aptitude psychological functioning and medical status. By follow-up in national databases, information on unemployment and social welfare assistance was obtained. FindingsIndividuals who used cannabis at high levels in adolescence had increased risk of future unemployment and of receiving social welfare assistance. Adjusted for all confounders (social background, psychological functioning, health behaviours, educational level, psychiatric diagnoses), an increased relative risk (RR) of unemployment remained in the group reporting cannabis use >50 times [RR=1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.53] only. For social welfare assistance, RR in the group reporting cannabis use 1-10 times was 1.15 (95% CI=1.06-1.26), RR for 11-50 times was 1.21 (95% CI=1.04-1.42) and RR for >50 times was 1.38 (95% CI=1.19-1.62). ConclusionsHeavy cannabis use among Swedish men in late adolescence appears to be associated with unemployment and being in need of social welfare assistance in adulthood. These associations are not explained fully by other health-related, social or behavioural problems.

  • 40. Danielsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Markström, Agneta
    Light Therapy With Scheduled Rise Times in Young Adults With Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder: Therapeutic Outcomes and Possible Predictors2018In: Behavioural Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1540-2002, E-ISSN 1540-2010, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 325-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical trials with light therapy (LT) for delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) are sparse and little is known about factors that are favorable for improvements. In this study, LT with scheduled rise times was conducted at home for 14 days by 44 participants with DSPD aged 16-26 years. Primary outcomes were sleep onset and sleep offset. Potential predictors were demographic characteristics, chronotype, dim light melatonin onset, the number of days the LT lamp was used, the daily duration of LT, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, depression, worry, and rumination. Significant advances were observed in sleep onset and sleep offset from baseline to the end of treatment. The number of days of LT predicted earlier sleep onset and sleep offset.

  • 41. Davies, G.
    et al.
    Armstrong, N.
    Bis, J. C.
    Bressler, J.
    Chouraki, V.
    Giddaluru, S.
    Hofer, E.
    Ibrahim-Verbaas, C. A.
    Kirin, M.
    Lahti, J.
    van der Lee, S. J.
    Le Hellard, S.
    Liu, T.
    Marioni, R. E.
    Oldmeadow, C.
    Postmus, I.
    Smith, A. V.
    Smith, J. A.
    Thalamuthu, A.
    Thomson, R.
    Vitart, V.
    Wang, J.
    Yu, L.
    Zgaga, L.
    Zhao, W.
    Boxall, R.
    Harris, S. E.
    Hill, W. D.
    Liewald, D. C.
    Luciano, M.
    Adams, H.
    Ames, D.
    Amin, N.
    Amouyel, P.
    Assareh, A. A.
    Au, R.
    Becker, J. T.
    Beiser, A.
    Berr, C.
    Bertram, L.
    Boerwinkle, E.
    Buckley, B. M.
    Campbell, H.
    Corley, J.
    De Jager, P. L.
    Dufouil, C.
    Eriksson, J. G.
    Espeseth, T.
    Faul, J. D.
    Ford, I.
    Gottesman, R. F.
    Griswold, M. E.
    Gudnason, V.
    Harris, T. B.
    Heiss, G.
    Hofman, A.
    Holliday, E. G.
    Huffman, J.
    Kardia, S. L. R.
    Kochan, N.
    Knopman, D. S.
    Kwok, J. B.
    Lambert, J-C
    Lee, T.
    Li, G.
    Li, S-C
    Loitfelder, M.
    Lopez, O. L.
    Lundervold, A. J.
    Lundqvist, A.
    Mather, K. A.
    Mirza, S. S.
    Nyberg, L.
    Oostra, B. A.
    Palotie, A.
    Papenberg, Goran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Pattie, A.
    Petrovic, K.
    Polasek, O.
    Psaty, B. M.
    Redmond, P.
    Reppermund, S.
    Rotter, J. I.
    Schmidt, H.
    Schuur, M.
    Schofield, P. W.
    Scott, R. J.
    Steen, V. M.
    Stott, D. J.
    Van Swieten, J. C.
    Taylor, K. D.
    Trollor, J.
    Trompet, S.
    Uitterlinden, A. G.
    Weinstein, G.
    Widen, E.
    Windham, B. G.
    Jukema, J. W.
    Wright, A. F.
    Wright, M. J.
    Yang, Q.
    Amieva, H.
    Attia, J. R.
    Bennett, D. A.
    Brodaty, H.
    de Craen, A. J. M.
    Hayward, C.
    Ikram, M. A.
    Lindenberger, U.
    Nilsson, L-G
    Porteous, D. J.
    Raikkonen, K.
    Reinvang, I.
    Rudan, I.
    Sachdev, P. S.
    Schmidt, R.
    Schofield, P. R.
    Srikanth, V.
    Starr, J. M.
    Turner, S. T.
    Weir, D. R.
    Wilson, J. F.
    Van Duijn, C.
    Launer, L.
    Fitzpatrick, A. L.
    Seshadri, S.
    Jr, T. H. Mosley
    Deary, I. J.
    Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)2015In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health-and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of 31 cohorts (N = 53 949) in which the participants had undertaken multiple, diverse cognitive tests. A general cognitive function phenotype was tested for, and created in each cohort by principal component analysis. We report 13 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations in three genomic regions, 6q16.1, 14q12 and 19q13.32 (best SNP and closest gene, respectively: rs10457441, P = 3.93 x 10(-9), MIR2113; rs17522122, P = 2.55 x 10(-8), AKAP6; rs10119, P = 5.67 x 10(-9), APOE/TOMM40). We report one gene-based significant association with the HMGN1 gene located on chromosome 21 (P = 1x10(-6)). These genes have previously been associated with neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Meta-analysis results are consistent with a polygenic model of inheritance. To estimate SNP-based heritability, the genome-wide complex trait analysis procedure was applied to two large cohorts, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (N = 6617) and the Health and Retirement Study (N = 5976). The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for by all genotyped common SNPs was 29% (s.e. = 5%) and 28% (s.e. = 7%), respectively. Using polygenic prediction analysis, similar to 1.2% of the variance in general cognitive function was predicted in the Generation Scotland cohort (N = 5487; P = 1.5 x 10(-17)). In hypothesis-driven tests, there was significant association between general cognitive function and four genes previously associated with Alzheimer's disease: TOMM40, APOE, ABCG1 and MEF2C.

  • 42. Davstad, Ingrid
    et al.
    Allebeck, Peter
    Leifman, Anders
    Stenbacka, Marlene
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Self-reported drug use and mortality among a nationwide sample of Swedish conscripts - A 35-year follow-up2011In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 118, no 2-3, p. 383-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drug users in clinical samples have elevated mortality compared with the general population, but little is known about mortality among users of drugs within the general population. Aim: To determine whether self-reported use of illicit drugs and non-prescribed sedatives/hypnotics among young men in the general population is related to mortality. Methods: A 35-year follow-up of 48 024 Swedish men, born 1949-1951 and conscripted in 1969/1970, among whom drug use was reported by 8767 subjects. Cross-record linkage was effected between individual data from the Swedish conscription and other national registers. Deaths and causes of death/1000 person-years were calculated. Cox PH regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for death with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). An HR was calculated for users of different dominant drugs at conscription compared with non-users by age interval, after adjusting for confounders and hospitalisation with a drug-related diagnosis. Results: Drug users showed elevated mortality (HR 1.61, p < 0.05) compared with non-users. After adjusting for risk factors, users of stimulants (HR 4.41, p < 0.05), cannabis (HR 4.27, p < 0.05), opioids (HR 2.83, p > 0.05), hallucinogens (HR 3.88, p < 0.05) and unspecified drugs (HR 4.62, p < 0.05) at conscription with a drug-related diagnosis during follow-up showed an HR approaching the standard mortality ratios in clinical samples. Among other drug users (95.5%), only stimulant users showed statistically significantly increased mortality (HR 1.96, p < 0.05). Conclusions: In a life-time perspective, drug use among young men in the general population was a marker of premature death, even a long time after exposure.

  • 43. Dietze, Paul
    et al.
    Agius, Paul A.
    Livingston, Michael
    Callinan, Sarah
    Jenkinson, Rebecca
    Lim, Megan S. C.
    Wright, Cassandra J. C.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Correlates of alcohol consumption on heavy drinking occasions of young risky drinkers: event versus personal characteristics2017In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 112, no 8, p. 1369-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Risky single-occasion drinking (RSOD) by young people is a serious public health issue, yet little is known about the specific circumstances of risky drinking occasions. This study examined the independent effects of event- and individual-specific variables on RSOD. Design Longitudinal cohort study measuring self-reported RSOD and event- and individual-specific variables across two drinking occasions approximately 1 year apart. Setting Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Participants A sample of 710 young risky drinkers aged between 18 and 25years and defined as engaging in risky drinking practices (males: consumed alcohol in excess of 10 Australian Standard Drinks (ASD: 10g ethanol) in a single occasion in the previous year; females: consumed alcohol in excess of seven ASD for females in a single occasion in the previous year). Measurements Random digit-dial telephone landline survey of the most recent heavy drinking occasion and socio-demographic variables. The primary outcome was the log of the total drinks consumed in the most recent heavy drinking occasion. Event-specific (e.g. number of drinking locations) and time-varying (e.g. weekly income) and time-invariant (e.g. sex) individual-specific variables were examined as correlates of total drinks consumed. Findings Changes in event-specific characteristics including the length of the drinking occasion (Likelihood Ratio (2)(2)=24.4, P<0.001), the number of drinking locations (Wald (2)((1))=7.6, P=0.006) and the number of different drink types (Wald (2)((1))=13.6, P<0.001) were associated with increases in total drinks consumed, after adjustment for time-invariant and time-variant individual-specific variables such as gender, income level and weekly consumption. Few other effects were noted. Conclusions Event-specific characteristics are important predictors of the number of drinks consumed during risky single occasion drinking (RSOD) and illustrate the importance of event contexts when considering interventions targeting RSOD. The total number of drinks consumed in a RSOD session appears to rise independently with the duration of the drinking event, the number of drinking locations and the number of different types of beverage consumed.

  • 44. Duarte Fernandes, Carla Patricia
    et al.
    Tjelta Westlye, Lars
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Christoforou, Andrea
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Johansen Lundervold, Astri
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Steen, Vidar Martin
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Lack of association of the rs1344706 ZNF804A variant with cognitive functions and DTI indices of white matter microstructure in two independent healthy populations2014In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 222, no 1-2, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rs1344706 single nucleotide polymorphism with in intron 2 of the ZNF804A gene is strongly associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This variant has also been associated in some studies with a range of cognitive and neuro imaging phenotypes, but several studies have reported no effect on the same phenotypes in other samples. Here, we genotyped 670 healthy adult Norwegian subjects and 1753 healthy adult Swedish subjects for rs1344706, and tested for associations with cognitive phenotypes including general intellectual abilities, memory functions and cognitive inhibition. We also tested whether rs1344706 is associated with white matter microstructural properties using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 250 to 340 of the Norwegian and Swedish subjects, respectively. Whole-brain voxel-wise statistical modeling of the effect of the ZNF804A variant on two DTI indices, fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD), was performed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), and commonly reported effect sizes were calculated within several large-scale white matter pathways based on neuroanatomic atlases. No significant associations were found between rs1344706 and the cognitive traits or white matter microstructure. We conclude that the rs1344706 SNP has no significant effect on these phenotypes in our two reasonably powered samples.

  • 45.
    Dåderman, Anna M.
    Stockholm University.
    Personality traits and psychopathy (PCL-R) in male juvenile delinquents2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 46. Ebert, D. D.
    et al.
    Donkin, L.
    Andersson, G.
    Andrews, G.
    Berger, T.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Choi, I.
    Laferton, J. A. C.
    Johansson, R.
    Kleiboer, A.
    Lange, A.
    Lehr, D.
    Reins, J. A.
    Funk, B.
    Newby, J.
    Perini, S.
    Riper, H.
    Ruwaard, J.
    Sheeber, L.
    Snoek, F. J.
    Titov, N.
    Ünlü Ince, B.
    van Bastelaar, K.
    Vernmark, K.
    van Straten, A.
    Warmerdam, L.
    Salsman, N.
    Cuijpers, P.
    Does Internet-based guided-self-help for depression cause harm? An individual participant data meta-analysis on deterioration rates and its moderators in randomized controlled trials2016In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 46, no 13, p. 2679-2693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost nothing is known about the potential negative effects of Internet-based psychological treatments for depression. This study aims at investigating deterioration and its moderators within randomized trials on Internet-based guided self-help for adult depression, using an individual patient data meta-analyses (IPDMA) approach.

    Studies were identified through systematic searches (PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library). Deterioration in participants was defined as a significant symptom increase according to the reliable change index (i.e. 7.68 points in the CES-D; 7.63 points in the BDI). Two-step IPDMA procedures, with a random-effects model were used to pool data.

    A total of 18 studies (21 comparisons, 2079 participants) contributed data to the analysis. The risk for a reliable deterioration from baseline to post-treatment was significantly lower in the intervention v. control conditions (3.36 v. 7.60; relative risk 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.29–0.75). Education moderated effects on deterioration, with patients with low education displaying a higher risk for deterioration than patients with higher education. Deterioration rates for patients with low education did not differ statistically significantly between intervention and control groups. The benefit–risk ratio for patients with low education indicated that 9.38 patients achieve a treatment response for each patient experiencing a symptom deterioration.

    Internet-based guided self-help is associated with a mean reduced risk for a symptom deterioration compared to controls. Treatment and symptom progress of patients with low education should be closely monitored, as some patients might face an increased risk for symptom deterioration. Future studies should examine predictors of deterioration in patients with low education.

  • 47. Ebner, Natalie C.
    et al.
    Horta, Marilyn
    Lin, Tian
    Feifel, David
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cohen, Ronald A.
    Oxytocin modulates meta-mood as a function of age and sex2015In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 7, article id 175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attending to and understanding one's own feelings are components of meta mood and constitute important socio-affective skills across the entire lifespan. Growing evidence suggests a modulatory role of the neuropeptide oxytocin on various socio-affective processes. Going beyond previous work that almost exclusively examined young men and perceptions of emotions in others, the current study investigated effects of intranasal oxytocin on meta-mood in young and older men and women. In a double-blind between-group design, participants were randomly assigned to self-administer either intranasal oxytocin or a placebo before responding to items from the Trait Meta Mood Scale (TMMS) about attention to feelings and clarity of feelings. In contrast to older women, oxytocin relative to placebo increased attention to feelings in older men. Oxytocin relative to placebo enhanced meta-mood in young female participants but reduced it in older female participants. This pattern of findings supports an age- and sex-differential modulatory function of the neuropeptide oxytocin on meta-mood, possibly associated with neurobiological differences with age and sex.

  • 48.
    Eisler, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eisler, Hannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mori, S.
    Cognitive impairment and subjective time in schizophrenics2011In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, p. 205-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An experimental study was conducted to compare time perception of short durations, including intra- and interindividual variability of subjective duration judgments, in schizophrenic and in healthy males. Methods: The psychological methods of reproduction, and of verbal estimation in subjective seconds, were used. Results: It was found 1) that the means of the reproductions do not differ between the 2 groups, 2) the schizophrenics verbally estimated all durations longer and less veridical than the healthy subjects, 3) the variability of the estimates between, as well as within, subjects is much greater in schizophrenics than in the healthy group, 4) also the estimates by the schizophrenic group showed an approximately linear function of responses vs. the reference durations in log-log coordinates, in agreement with Stevens# power law. Conclusion: Schizophrenics are described in terms of distraction and of chaotic and disorganized behavior. This important aspect of schizophrenic symptomatology typically results in cognitive impairment. The impairment may be at the root of the deviant, though fairly consistent, estimations by the schizophrenic subjects. This vulnerability entails that the schizophrenics seem to be unable to translate perceived time into numbers (seconds), probably because of their general difficulty in being able to quantify. To be more specific, it appears that the better understanding of the cognitive processes and the vulnerability factors of experiencing time and of time-structuring behavior is important knowledge as to how the schizophrenics individuals orient themselves in time and space. The conclusion is that our result does not support the view of general time distortion as such in schizophrenia.

  • 49.
    Ek, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    General versus executive cognitive ability in pupils with ADHD and with milder attention problems2013In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, ISSN 1176-6328, E-ISSN 1178-2021, Vol. 9, p. 163-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyze two main types of cognitive domains in school children with different types and severities of attention-related problems. The cognitive domains examined were general cognitive ability and executive abilities. Methods: Three different clinical samples of pupils with school problems were analyzed to assess their cognitive Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children profiles. In particular, the general cognitive ability index and the executive markers (ie, verbal memory index and processing speed index) were of interest. Of the total sample (n = 198), two main groups were contrasted; one met the full criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)/subthreshold ADHD, and one was comprised of those with milder attention problems, insufficient to meet the criteria for ADHD/subthreshold ADHD. Results: It could be demonstrated that both groups had a significantly higher score on the general cognitive ability index than on measures of working memory and processing speed. This difference was more pronounced for boys. Conclusion: These types of cognitive differences need to be considered in children with different kinds of learning, behavior, and attention problems; this is also true for children presenting with an average general intelligence quotient and with milder attention problems. Current educational expectations are demanding for children with mild difficulties, and such cognitive information will add to the understanding of the child's learning problems, hopefully leading to a better adapted education than that conventionally available.

  • 50.
    Elwin, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ek, Lena
    Schroder, Agneta
    Kjellin, Lars
    Autobiographical Accounts of Sensing in Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism2012In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 420-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory experiences in Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA) were explored by qualitative content analysis of autobiographical texts by persons with AS/HFA. Predetermined categories of hyper- and hyposensitivity were applied to texts. Hypersensitivity consists of strong reactions and heightened apprehension in reaction to external stimuli, sometimes together with overfocused or unselective attention. It was common in vision, hearing, and touch. In contrast, hyposensitivity was frequent in reaction to internal and body stimuli such as interoception, proprioception, and pain. It consists of less registration, discrimination, and recognition of stimuli as well as cravings for specific stimuli. Awareness of the strong impact of sensitivity is essential for creating good environments and encounters in the context of psychiatric and other health care.

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