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  • 1. Abiven, Samuel
    et al.
    Hund, Andreas
    Martinsen, Vegard
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Norway; Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Norway .
    Biochar amendment increases maize root surface areas and branching: a shovelomics study in Zambia2015In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 395, no 1-2, p. 45-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positive crop yield effects from biochar are likely explained by chemical, physical and/or biological factors. However, studies describing plant allometric changes are scarcer, but may be crucial to understand the biochar effect. The main aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of biochar on root architecture under field conditions in a tropical setting. The presented work describes a shovelomics (i.e., description of root traits in the field) study on the effect of biochar on maize root architecture. Four field experiments we carried out at two different locations in Zambia, exhibiting non-fertile to relatively fertile soils. Roots of maize crop (Zea mays L.) were sampled from treatments with fertilizer (control) and with a combination of fertilizer and 4 t.ha(-1) maize biochar application incorporated in the soil. For the four sites, the average grain yield increase upon biochar addition was 45 +/- 14 % relative to the fertilized control (from 2.1-6.0 to 3.1-9.1 ton ha(-1)). The root biomass was approximately twice as large for biochar-amended plots. More extensive root systems (especially characterized by a larger root opening angle (+14 +/- 11 %) and wider root systems (+20 +/- 15 %)) were observed at all biochar-amended sites. Root systems exhibited significantly higher specific surface areas (+54 +/- 14 %), branching and fine roots: +70 +/- 56 %) in the presence of biochar. Biochar amendment resulted in more developed root systems and larger yields. The more extensive root systems may have contributed to the observed yield increases, e.g., by improving immobile nutrients uptake in soils that are unfertile or in areas with prolonged dry spells.

  • 2.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Strongly heated carbohydrate-rich food is an overlooked problem in cancer risk evaluation2018In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 121, p. 151-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cascade of compounds is produced when foodstuffs are heated at high temperatures but only a few of these compounds have been identified and quantified. In this study data are evaluated regarding differences in the micronucleus frequency of human erythrocytes (fMNs) in peripheral blood (a known biomarker of genotoxicity) in individuals that consumed either high- or low-heated food during a 4-day period. Concomitantly, acrylamide (aa) levels were measured in the food that the participants consumed. The obtained fMNs in this human study are compared with the fMNs in mice after comparable exposure levels of pure aa. The results of this comparison showed several hundred times higher fMNs in humans compared with mice. With an assumed linear correlation between an increased genotoxic effect and cancer, our data suggest that aa only represents a fraction of all carcinogenic compounds produced in heated carbohydrate-rich food. Consequently, our daily intake of carbohydrate-rich food heated at high temperatures might be responsible for one-fifth of the rate of the total cancer risk. One sentence summary: A biomarker of genotoxicity indicates the risk of cancer to be some hundred-fold greater in heated carbohydrate-rich food than the risk calculated from animal studies on pure acrylamide.

  • 3.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ilback, Nils-Gunnar
    The synthetic food colouring agent Allura Red AC (E129) is not genotoxic in a flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay in vivo2013In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 59, p. 86-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The safety of several azo colouring agents, used as food additives, has during the years been questioned. Allura Red AC (E129) has in some publications been classified as genotoxic. In fact, in the European Union, Allura Red is permitted as a food additive in human food, but, surprisingly, it was not acceptable as an additive for use in animal feed. In this study we have evaluated whether Allura Red is genotoxic using a flow cytometer-based micronucleus assay in peripheral blood of mice. Male FVB mice were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of various doses of Allura Red and sacrificed at 46 h after treatment. The tested doses were 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Each dose group constituted three mice, except for in the dose group of 1000 mg/kg b.w., which constituted four mice. Blood samples were collected and the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMNPCE) and the cell proliferation (%PCE) was determined. The analyses did not show any significant difference in the %PCE or in the fMNPCE. Consequently, under the testing circumstances one can conclude that Allura Red is not genotoxic.

  • 4.
    Ahlbeck Bergendahl, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Salvanes, Anne Gro V.
    Braithwaite, Victoria A.
    Determining the effects of duration and recency of exposure to environmental enrichment2016In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 176, p. 163-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience can help animals adapt their behaviour to fit the environment or conditions that they find themselves in. Understanding how and when experience affects behaviour is important for the animals we rear in captivity. This is particularly true when we rear animals with the intent of releasing them into the wild as part of population rehabilitation and conservation efforts. We investigated how exposure to a changing, more complex environment promotes behavioural development in juvenile trout. Four groups of fish were compared; (i) fish that were maintained without enrichment, (ii) fish that were exposed to an early period of enrichment, but were then returned to a plain environment, (iii) fish that were maintained in plain conditions, but were then exposed to enrichment towards the end of the rearing phase, (iv) a group that were kept in enriched conditions throughout the 12 week rearing period. We then assessed fish anxiety levels, their spatial learning ability, and the capacity of the fish to find their way through a barrier where different routes were presented across 4 different trials. Fish that experienced enriched conditions for the longest duration had superior spatial learning abilities, and they were better at finding the correct route to get past the barrier than fish from the remaining three treatments. Positive effects on behaviour were, however, also found in the fish that only experienced enrichment in the last part of the rearing period, compared to the control, or fish exposed to early enrichment. No effect of enrichment was found on levels of anxiety in any of the groups.

  • 5.
    Ahlbeck, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Hansson, Sture
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Hjerne, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Evaluating fish diet analysis methods by individual-based modelling2012In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 1184-1201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of diet compositions is important in ecological research. There are many methods available and numerous aspects of diet composition. Here we used modelling to evaluate how well different diet analysis methods describe the true diet of fish, expressed in mass percentages. The methods studied were both basic methods (frequency of occurrence, dominance, numeric, mass, points) and composite indices (Index of Relative Importance, Comparative Feeding Index). Analyses were based on both averaged stomach content of individual fish and on pooled content from several fish. Prey preference, prey size, and evacuation rate influenced the performance of the diet analysis methods. The basic methods performed better than composite indices. Mass and points methods produced diet compositions most similar to the true diet and were also most robust, indicating that these methods should be used to describe energetic-nutritional sources of fish.

  • 6.
    Ahlqvist, Ola
    et al.
    Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
    Wästfelt, Anders
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Michael Meinild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Formalized interpretation of compound land use objects – Mapping historical summer farms from a single satellite image2012In: Journal of Land Use Science, ISSN 1747-423X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 89-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Notions of land cover relating to physical landscape characters are readily captured by satellite imagery. Land use on the other hand relates more to the societal aspects of a landscape. We argue that much of the spatial configuration of landscape characters is related to land use and that satellite data can be used to represent and investigate interpretations of land use. We propose and demonstrate the joint use of a novel SRPC procedure for satellite imagery together with an explicit representation of category semantics. We use these two mechanisms to identify a collection of conceptual spaces related to land use on Swedish historic summer farms. We also outline a framework for analysis of the relations between two separate ways of knowing: the machine-based knowledge and the human, mental knowledge. An evaluation demonstrates that satellite images can be used to identify land use processes as a mixture of land cover objects occurring in particular spatial contextual relationships closely tied to the land use category semantics. This opens up an unexplored possibility for research on vague spatial ontologies and questions on how to formally articulate different interpretations of space, land use, and other branches of spatial social science.

  • 7. Akselsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Belyazid, Salim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Critical biomass harvesting - Applying a new concept for Swedish forest soils2018In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 409, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contribution of forest harvesting to base cation losses and soil acidification has increased in recent years in Sweden, as the demand for bioenergy has increased and the sulphur deposition has decreased. Thus, new policy tools are required to evaluate the progress of the recovery from acidification, and as a basis for forest management recommendations. In this study we introduce and test a concept, Critical biomass harvesting. The concept builds on the concept Critical loads, which has been used world-wide for several decades as a bridge between science and policies related to transboundary air pollution and acidification. The basis for the concept is an acidity mass balance, with sources and sinks of acidity. A critical limit defines the highest acceptable acidification status of the water leaving the root zone. Based on the critical limit, the highest allowed biomass harvesting can be calculated, keeping the other parameters constant. In this study the critical limit was set to ANC (Acid Neutralizing Capacity) = 0. Nitrogen was assumed to be affecting acidity only if it leaches from the root zone. The critical biomass harvesting was calculated for almost 12000 National Forest Inventory sites with spruce and pine forest, using the best available data on deposition, weathering and nitrogen leaching. The exceedance of critical biomass harvesting was calculated as the difference between the estimated harvest losses and the critical biomass harvesting. The results were presented as median values in merged catchments in a catchment database, with totally 2079 merged catchments in Sweden. According to the calculations, critical biomass harvesting was exceeded in the southern half of Sweden already at stem harvesting in spruce forests. Whole-tree harvesting expanded the exceedance area, and increased the exceedance levels in southern Sweden. The exceedance in pine forest was lower and affected smaller areas. It was concluded that the concept of critical biomass harvesting can be successfully applied on the same database that has been used for critical load calculations in Sweden, using basically the same approach as has been extensively applied, evaluated and discussed in a critical load context. The results from the calculations in Sweden indicate that whole-tree harvesting, without wood ash recycling, can be expected to further slow down recovery, especially in the most acidified parts of the country, in the southwest.

  • 8.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

  • 9.
    Alexander, Steven M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, USA.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Barnes, Michele L.
    Untangling the drivers of community cohesion in small-scale fisheries2018In: International Journal of the Commons, ISSN 1875-0281, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 519-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable fisheries require strong management and effective governance. However, small-scale fisheries (SSF) often lack formal institutions, leaving management in the hands of local users in the form of various governance approaches (e.g. local, traditional, or co-management). The effectiveness of these approaches inherently relies upon some level of cohesion among resource users to facilitate agreement on common policies and practices regarding common pool fishery resources. Understanding the factors driving the formation and maintenance of community cohesion in SSF is therefore critical if we are to devise more effective participatory governance approaches and encourage and empower decentralized, localized, and community-based resource management approaches. Here, we adopt a social relational network perspective to propose a suite of hypothesized drivers that lead to the establishment of social ties among fishers that build the foundation for community cohesion. We then draw on detailed data from Jamaica's small-scale fishery to empirically test these drivers by employing a set of nested exponential random graph models (ERGMs) based on specific structural building blocks (i.e. network configurations) theorized to influence the establishment of social ties. Our results demonstrate that multiple drivers are at play, but that collectively, gear-based homophily, geographic proximity, and leadership play particularly important roles. We discuss the extent to which these drivers help explain previous experiences, as well as their implications for future and sustained collective action in SSF in Jamaica and elsewhere.

  • 10.
    Allard, Anna
    et al.
    Institutionen för Skoglig Resurshushållning .
    Skånes, Helle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Miljöövervakning via infraröda flygbilder, ett väl använt verktyg med goda framtidsutsikter i Sverige2010In: Kart- och bildteknik (Mapping and Image Science), Vol. 4, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Johansson, Frank
    Sundbom, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lack of trophic polymorphism despite substantial genetic differentiation in sympatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations2017In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 643-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sympatric populations occur in many freshwater fish species; such populations are typically detected through morphological distinctions that are often coupled to food niche and genetic separations. In salmonids, trophic and genetically separate sympatric populations have been reported in landlocked Arctic char, whitefish and brown trout. In Arctic char and brown trout rare cases of sympatric, genetically distinct populations have been detected based on genetic data alone, with no apparent morphological differences, that is cryptic structuring. It remains unknown whether such cryptic, sympatric structuring can be coupled to food niche separation. Here, we perform an extensive screening for trophic divergence of two genetically divergent, seemingly cryptic, sympatric brown trout populations documented to remain in stable sympatry over several decades in two interconnected, tiny mountain lakes in a nature reserve in central Sweden. We investigate body shape, body length, gill raker metrics, breeding status and diet (stomach content analysis and stable isotopes) in these populations. We find small significant differences for body shape, body size and breeding status, and no evidence of food niche separation between these two populations. In contrast, fish in the two lakes differed in body shape, diet, and nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures despite no genetic difference between lakes. These genetically divergent populations apparently coexist using the same food resources and showing the same adaptive plasticity to the local food niches of the two separate lakes. Such observations have not been reported previously but may be more common than recognised as genetic screenings are necessary to detect the structures.

  • 12. Andrade, Carlos A. P.
    et al.
    Nascimento, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Conceicao, Luis E. C.
    Linares, Fatima
    Lacuisse, Marc
    Dinis, Maria T.
    Red Porgy, Pagrus pagrus, Larvae Performance and Nutritional Condition in Response to Different Weaning Regimes2012In: Journal of the World Aquaculture Society, ISSN 0893-8849, E-ISSN 1749-7345, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 321-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Red porgy, Pagrus pagrus, is a candidate species for aquaculture diversification. The aim of this work was to assess whether an early supply of enriched Artemia (D1) or a direct step to dry diets (D3) would be advantageous weaning strategies for red porgy larvae, compared to a later supply of Artemia followed by dry diets (D2). Direct weaning to dry diet resulted in significantly lower growth, survival, pancreatic (trypsin and lipase), and intestinal (alkaline phosphatase) enzyme-specific activity, with the exception of leucine-alanine peptidase. The direct weaning strategy presented severe nutritional restrictions from early weaning stages with an associated delay of the maturation of digestive system. The two-step strategy presented in D1 and D2 resulted in comparable results in most parameters, including survival. Weaning using enriched Artemia as an intermediate step is confirmed as the most adequate strategy for red porgy larvae. Digestive enzymes and selected fatty acids correlated well with performance responses to dietary regimes, thereby supporting the use of these parameters as sensitive and reliable indicators of red porgy nutritional or physiological status during larval stages.

  • 13. Andrade, Carlos A. P.
    et al.
    Nascimento, Francisco J. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Nogueira, Natacha
    Pimenta, Filomena
    Dinis, Maria T.
    Narciso, Luis
    Allometric Growth in Red Porgy Larvae: Developing Morphological Indices for Mesocosm Semi-Intensive Culture2013In: North American Journal of Aquaculture, ISSN 1522-2055, E-ISSN 1548-8454, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the morphological development, allometric growth, and cannibalistic behavior of Red Porgy Pagrus pagrus reared in mesocosm semi-intensive culture. The study was conducted from hatching to 32 d after hatching (DAH). Red porgy ontogeny was characterized by strong positive allometric growth of body depth at anus (BDA) to 6.7mm total length (TL) at about 2122 DAH. The BDA combined with standard length (SL) in a morphometric index was found to be better correlated with dry weight than TL and provided an improved method to estimate larval growth. Mouth size also exhibited strong positive allometric growth at early larval stages that, together with inflation of the swim bladder, may have contributed to improve feeding ability, in preparation for the high energy demands of metamorphosis. A predictive regression model developed for cannibalism underestimated prey size. Cannibalism coincided with the development of acidic digestion and was first evident at 27 DAH as larvae reached about 23% of their maximum size variation. We hypothesize that cannibalism is associated with larval size and condition, but is prompted by physiological and energetic factors. The bivariate morphometric index developed in this study can be used to mitigate cannibalism by controlling larval size variation and improving feed supply. The morphological measurements and morphometric indices that result from this study provide important tools for improving red porgy larvae culture. Received December 13, 2011; accepted July 12, 2012

  • 14.
    Angeler, David G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Allen, Craig R.
    Garmestani, Ahjond S.
    Gunderson, Lance H.
    Hjerne, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Winder, Monika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e0146053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  • 15.
    Arama, Charles
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. University of Sciences Techniques and Technologies of Bamako, Mali.
    Troye-Blomberg, Marita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    The path of malaria vaccine development: challenges and perspectives2014In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 275, no 5, p. 456-466Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites of the Plasmodium genus. In many parts of the world, the parasites have developed resistance to a number of antimalarial agents. Key interventions to control malaria include prompt and effective treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapies, use of insecticidal nets by individuals at risk and active research into malaria vaccines. Protection against malaria through vaccination was demonstrated more than 30years ago when individuals were vaccinated via repeated bites by Plasmodium falciparum-infected and irradiated but still metabolically active mosquitoes. However, vaccination with high doses of irradiated sporozoites injected into humans has long been considered impractical. Yet, following recent success using whole-organism vaccines, the approach has received renewed interest; it was recently reported that repeated injections of irradiated sporozoites increased protection in 80 vaccinated individuals. Other approaches include subunit malaria vaccines, such as the current leading candidate RTS,S (consisting of fusion between a portion of the P.falciparum-derived circumsporozoite protein and the hepatitis B surface antigen), which has been demonstrated to induce reasonably good protection. Although results have been encouraging, the level of protection is generally considered to be too low to achieve eradication of malaria. There is great interest in developing new and better formulations and stable delivery systems to improve immunogenicity. In this review, we will discuss recent strategies to develop efficient malaria vaccines.

  • 16.
    Axelsson, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Det medeltida Sverige: 4, Småland. 5, Tjust2008Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17. Batidzirai, B.
    et al.
    Johnson, Francis X.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Energy security, agro-industrial development and international trade: the case of sugarcane in southern Africa2012In: Socioeconomic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuels: Evidence from Developing Nations / [ed] Alexandros Gasparatos and Per Stromberg, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, p. 254-277Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bauer, Barbara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Meier, H. E. Markus
    Casini, Michele
    Hoff, Ayoe
    Margoński, Piotr
    Orio, Alessandro
    Saraiva, Sofia
    Steenbeek, Jeroen
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Reducing eutrophication increases spatial extent of communities supporting commercial fisheries: a model case study2018In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 1306-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate if eutrophication management has the potential to substantially affect which areas are going to be most suitable for commercial fishing in the future. We use a spatial ecosystem model, forced by a coupled physical-biogeochemical model, to simulate the spatial distribution of functional groups within a marine ecosystem, which depends on their respective tolerances to abiotic factors, trophic interactions, and fishing. We simulate the future long-term spatial developments of the community composition and their potential implications for fisheries under three different nutrient management scenarios and changing climate. The three nutrient management scenarios result in contrasting developments of bottom oxygen concentrations and phytoplankton abundance, with substantial effects on fish production. Nutrient load reduction increases the spatial extent of the areas suitable for the commercially most valuable demersal fish predator and all types of fisheries. This suggests that strategic planning of fishery management strategies could benefit from considering future changes in species distributions due to changes in eutrophication. We show that combining approaches from climate research, physical oceanography, biogeochemistry, biogeography, and trophic ecology with economical information provides a strong foundation to produce scientific knowledge that can support a multisectoral management of ecosystems.

  • 19.
    Berg, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Berg, Charlotte
    Nguyen, Thanh Tam
    Integrated Rice-Fish Farming: Safeguarding Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Sustainable Food Production in the Mekong Delta2012In: Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, ISSN 1044-0046, E-ISSN 1540-7578, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 859-872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparison of agricultural practices, with a specific focus on pesticide use, between rice and rice-fish farmers in the Can Tho' and Tien Giang provinces of the Mekong Delta in 2007, shows that integrated rice-fish farming can provide a competitive alternative to intensive rice mono-cropping, if the farmer restricts the use of pesticides and takes full advantage of the ecosystem services provided by the rice-field ecosystem. In Can Tho', rice-fish farmers had significantly higher income (43.6 million dong ha(-1) year(-1)) than other farmer groups, while this was not seen among rice-fish famers in Tien Giang (32.4 million dong ha(-1) year(-1)), which partly could be due to a high use of insecticides (0.9 kg active ingredient ha(-1) crop(-1)) and comparatively low fish yield among these farmers. The study emphasizes the need to rethink current agricultural systems and to provide opportunities for more diverse systems that maintain and enhance a range of ecosystem services and protect human health. Future production systems should not be optimized to only provide a single ecosystem service, such as rice, but designed to deliver a variety of interlinked ecosystem service such as rice, fish, pest control, and nutrient recycling.

  • 20.
    Berg, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Maneas, Giorgos
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Navarino Environmental Observatory, Greece.
    Salguero Engström, Amanda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    A Comparison between Organic and Conventional Olive Farming in Messenia, Greece2018In: Horticulturae, E-ISSN 2311-7524, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olive farming is one of the most important occupations in Messenia, Greece. The region is considered the largest olive producer in the country and it is recognized as a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) for Kalamata olive oil, which is considered extra fine. In response to the declining trend of organic olive farming in Greece, this study assesses to what extent organic olive farming in Messenia provides a financially and environmentally competitive alternative to conventional olive farming. In this study, 39 olive farmers (23 conventional and 16 organic) participated in interviews based on questionnaires. The results showed that organic olive farming is significantly more profitable than conventional farming, primarily because of a higher price for organic olive oil. Despite this, the majority of the conventional farmers perceived a low profit from organic farming as the main constraint to organic olive farming. All farmers agreed that organic olive farming contributed to a better environment, health and quality of olive oil. Organic farmers used fewer synthetic pesticides and fertilizers and applied more environmentally-friendly ground vegetation management techniques than conventional farmers. Overall, organic farming was found to provide a competitive and sustainable alternative to conventional olive farming in Messenia.

  • 21.
    Berg, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Nguyen, Thanh Tam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Nong Lam University, Vietnam.
    Use of pesticides and attitude to pest management strategies among rice and rice-fish farmers in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam2012In: International Journal of Pest Management, ISSN 0967-0874, E-ISSN 1366-5863, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 153-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses the use of pesticides and attitude to pest management strategies among rice and rice-fish farmersin Can Tho’ and Tien Giang provinces of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, in 2007. A comparison is made to a similarstudy in 1999, in order to identify changes in patterns of pesticide use and possible influences of integrated pestmanagement (IPM) programmes and brown planthopper (a major pest) outbreaks. One hundred and twenty farmersused 66 different pesticides, similar to the 64 pesticides recorded as being used in the 1999 survey. Nine of the 10 mostpopular pesticides in 2007 were the same as those found to be popular in 1999. Insecticides are used by 73–95% ofthe farmers, which is the most commonly employed type of pesticide. The number of applications of both herbicidesand fungicides has more than halved since 1999 for all farmers, while insecticide applications has doubled for IPMfarmers (those with prior training in IPM methodology). Similarly, the average dose of active ingredient (a.i.) ofinsecticides per crop has decreased slightly for non-IPM rice farmers, while it has more than doubled among IPMfarmers, resulting in almost the same amount of a.i. per crop for all groups of farmers (insecticides 0.6, fungicides 0.5,and herbicides 0.3 kg a.i. ha71 crop71). Overall, the results indicate a temporal trend for more selective use ofpesticides and an increased awareness among non-IPM farmers of the negative side effects of pesticide use.

  • 22.
    Bergendahl, I. Ahlbeck
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Holliland, Per Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Hansson, Sture
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Karlöf, Oliver
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Feeding range of age 1+year Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis in the Baltic Sea2017In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 2060-2072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the widespread Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis as a model organism, feeding ranges were investigated using stable-isotope ratios (N-15 and C-13) and body condition. Differences were found between closely located sampling sites in a littoral area without obvious migration barriers, indicating that individual fish had small feeding ranges. Body condition differences between sampled stations were consistent over 4 years. Such sedentary behaviour is important to consider in, e.g. fisheries management and environmental monitoring, as local catch regulations may be meaningful or geographic stability in sampling locations may reduce noise in data.

  • 23. Bermudez, Rafael
    et al.
    Feng, Yuanyuan
    Roleda, Michael Y.
    Tatters, Avery O.
    Hutchins, David A.
    Larsen, Thomas
    Boyd, Philip W.
    Hurd, Catriona L.
    Riebesell, Ulf
    Winder, Monika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Long-Term Conditioning to Elevated pCO(2) and Warming Influences the Fatty and Amino Acid Composition of the Diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0123945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unabated rise in anthropogenic CO2 emissions is predicted to strongly influence the ocean's environment, increasing the mean sea-surface temperature by 4 degrees C and causing a pH decline of 0.3 units by the year 2100. These changes are likely to affect the nutritional value of marine food sources since temperature and CO2 can influence the fatty (FA) and amino acid (AA) composition of marine primary producers. Here, essential amino (EA) and polyunsaturated fatty (PUFA) acids are of particular importance due to their nutritional value to higher trophic levels. In order to determine the interactive effects of CO2 and temperature on the nutritional quality of a primary producer, we analyzed the relative PUFA and EA composition of the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis cultured under a factorial matrix of 2 temperatures (14 and 19 degrees C) and 3 partial pressures of CO2 (180, 380, 750 mu atm) for >250 generations. Our results show a decay of similar to 3% and similar to 6% in PUFA and EA content in algae kept at a pCO(2) of 750 mu atm (high) compared to the 380 mu atm (intermediate) CO2 treatments at 14 degrees C. Cultures kept at 19 degrees C displayed a similar to 3% lower PUFA content under high compared to intermediate pCO(2), while EA did not show differences between treatments. Algae grown at a pCO(2) of 180 mu atm (low) had a lower PUFA and AA content in relation to those at intermediate and high CO2 levels at 14 degrees C, but there were no differences in EA at 19 degrees C for any CO2 treatment. This study is the first to report adverse effects of warming and acidification on the EA of a primary producer, and corroborates previous observations of negative effects of these stressors on PUFA. Considering that only similar to 20% of essential biomolecules such as PUFA (and possibly EA) are incorporated into new biomass at the next trophic level, the potential impacts of adverse effects of ocean warming and acidification at the base of the food web may be amplified towards higher trophic levels, which rely on them as source of essential biomolecules.

  • 24.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Alimentalities - Food for Sociology2015In: Mat är mer än mat: samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv på mat och måltider / [ed] Kerstin Bergström, Inger M. Jonsson, Hillevi Prell, Inga Wernersson, Helena Åberg, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2015, p. 247-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25. Björkman, Maria
    et al.
    Hambäck, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany. Växtekologi.
    Rämert, Birgitta
    Neighboring monocultures enhance the effect of intercropping in turnip root flies (Delia floralis).2007In: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, Vol. 124, p. 319-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of insect behaviour is essential for accurately interpreting studies of diversification and to develop diversified agroecosystems that have a reliable pest-suppressive effect. In this study, we investigated the egg-laying behaviour of the turnip root fly, Delia floralis (Fall.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), in an intercrop-monoculture system. We examined both the main effect of intercropping and the effect on oviposition in the border zone between a cabbage monoculture [Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata (Brassicaceae)] and a cabbage-red clover intercropping system [Trifolium pratense L. (Fabaceae)]. To investigate the border-effect, oviposition was measured along a transect from the border between the treatments to the centre of experimental plots. Intercropping reduced the total egg-laying of D. floralis with 42% in 2003 and 55% in 2004. In 2004, it was also found that the spatial distribution of eggs within the experimental plots was affected by distance from the adjoining treatment. The difference in egg-laying between monoculture and intercropping was most pronounced close to the border, where egg-laying was 68% lower on intercropped plants. This difference in egg numbers decreased gradually up to a distance of 3.5 m from the border, where intercropped plants had 43% fewer eggs than the corresponding monocultured plants. The reason behind this oviposition pattern is most likely that flies in intercropped plots have a higher probability of entering the monoculture if they are close to the border than if they are in the centre of a plot. When entering the monoculture, flies can pursue their egg-laying behaviour without being disrupted by the clover. As the final decision to land is visually stimulated, flies could also be attracted to fly from the intercropped plots into the monoculture, where host plants are more visually apparent. Visual cues could also hinder flies in a monoculture from entering an intercropped plot. Other possible patterns of insect attack due to differences in insect behaviour are discussed, as well as the practical application of the results of this study.

  • 26. Björkman, Maria
    et al.
    Hopkins, Richard
    Hambäck, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Rämert, Birgitta
    Effects of plant competition and herbivore density on the development of the turnip root fly (Delia floralis) in an intercropping system2009In: Arthropod-plant interactions, ISSN 1872-8855, Vol. 3, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, interactive effects of plant competition and herbivory on plant quality and herbivore development were examined in a greenhouse experiment where cabbage plants [Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata (Brassicaceae)] were intercropped with red clover [Trifolium pratense L. (Fabaceae)]. Cabbages were grown with two red clover densities and attack rates by the root feeding herbivore the turnip root fly, Delia floralis Fall. (Diptera: Anthomyiidae). Above ground and below ground cabbage biomass was reduced through intercropping and larval damage. Intercropping also resulted in lower nitrogen and higher carbon root levels compared with levels in the roots of monocultured cabbage. Furthermore, both root nitrogen and carbon levels increased with herbivory. Root neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and lignin content increased in response to both increased plant competition and higher egg densities. For lignin, an interaction effect was observed in the form of elevated levels in intercropped plants subjected to larval damage, while levels in roots of monocultured cabbage remained unchanged. The quality changes brought about by clover competition affected D. floralis development negatively, which resulted in reduced pupal weight. In addition, increased egg density also decreased larval growth. The effects on the development of D. floralis in relation to host plant quality are discussed.

  • 27.
    Blasiak, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan; United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Japan.
    Spijkers, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. James Cook University, Australia.
    Tokunaga, Kanae
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Yagi, Nobuyuki
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Climate change and marine fisheries: Least developed countries top global index of vulnerability2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, article id e0179632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future impacts of climate change on marine fisheries have the potential to negatively influence a wide range of socio-economic factors, including food security, livelihoods and public health, and even to reshape development trajectories and spark transboundary conflict. Yet there is considerable variability in the vulnerability of countries around the world to these effects. We calculate a vulnerability index of 147 countries by drawing on the most recent data related to the impacts of climate change on marine fisheries. Building on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change framework for vulnerability, we first construct aggregate indices for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity using 12 primary variables. Seven out of the ten most vulnerable countries on the resulting index are Small Island Developing States, and the top quartile of the index includes countries located in Africa (17), Asia (7), North America and the Caribbean (4) and Oceania (8). More than 87% of least developed countries are found within the top half of the vulnerability index, while the bottom half includes all but one of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development member states. This is primarily due to the tremendous variation in countries' adaptive capacity, as no such trends are evident from the exposure or sensitivity indices. A negative correlation exists between vulnerability and per capita carbon emissions, and the clustering of states at different levels of development across the vulnerability index suggests growing barriers to meeting global commitments to reducing inequality, promoting human well-being and ensuring sustainable cities and communities. The index provides a useful tool for prioritizing the allocation of climate finance, as well as activities aimed at capacity building and the transfer of marine technology.

  • 28.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The quality of compliance: investigating fishers' responses towards regulation and authorities2017In: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 682-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial amount of scientific effort goes into understanding and measuring compliance in fisheries. Understanding why, how and when fishers follow or violate rules is crucial for designing effective fishery policies that can halt overfishing. Non-compliance was initially explained almost exclusively with reference to economic and self-interested motivations. More recently, however, most explanations involve a combination of economic, social, political and environmental factors. Despite this recent development towards more holistic explanations, many scientists continue to frame the issue in binary terms: fishers either follow rules, or they don't. In this article we challenge this binary interpretation and focus attention on the diversity of fishers' dispositions and perceptions that underpin compliant behaviour. To this aim we construct a typology of fishers' responses towards regulation and authorities, thereby developing conceptual tools to understand different motivations and attitudes that underlie compliance outcomes. For this purpose, we identify the motivational postures of 'creativity' and 'reluctance', and then highlight their empirical relevance with an interview study of Swedish fishers. Reasons for studying the quality and diversity of fishers' motivations and responses are not purely academic. Conceptualizing and observing the quality of compliance can help policymakers and managers gauge and anticipate the potentiality of non-compliant fishing practices that may threaten the resilience of marine ecosystems.

  • 29.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Classifying fishers' behaviour. An invitation to fishing styles2016In: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 78-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study and classification of fishers’ behaviour remains a much debated topic. There is a tension between detailed empirical studies, which highlight the variety and diversity of fisheries, and the parsimony and generalization required to satisfy science and policy demands. This study contributes to this debate. The first sec- tion reviews quantitative methods currently used for classifying fishing practices. The review uncovers significant weaknesses in quantitative classification methods, which, we argue, can be improved through the complementary use of qualitative methods. To this purpose, we introduce the concept of ‘fishing style’, which integrates quantitative classification methods with qualitative analysis. We explain the scientific premises of the fishing-style concept, outline a general methodological framework and present a fishing-style analysis of Swedish Baltic Sea fisheries. Based on these results, we conclude that it is possible to classify fishing practices in a rel- atively uniform and limited number of styles that can highlight the rich, empirical diversity of fishers’ behaviour. We therefore propose that fishing-style analysis, based on an integration of quantitative and qualitative methods, can be an impor- tant step towards more effective and sustainable fisheries management.

  • 30. Borg, Saskia
    et al.
    Seubert, Janina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lipids in Eating and Appetite Regulation - A Neuro-Cognitive Perspective2017In: European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology, ISSN 1438-7697, E-ISSN 1438-9312, Vol. 119, no 12, article id 1700106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foods high in dietary fat provide a particularly energy-rich source of nutrition. A preferred food choice in humans, their intake is thought to contribute substantially to the current obesity epidemic. Fat has recently been proposed to constitute a basic taste; yet, its diverse sensory properties in the olfactory and somatosensory domain, as well as its postingestive effects have made the exact attributes that make its consumption so appealing difficult to disentangle. Recent scientific advances have shed light on the different molecular mechanisms underlying the sensory detection of fat in the periphery, and described their relevance for perceptual experience and eating behavior. However, these different analysis levels are to date poorly integrated, both within each sensory modality, and from a multisensory perspective.

  • 31. Bossio, Deborah
    et al.
    Erkossa, Teklu
    Dile, Yihun
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    McCartney, Matthew
    Killiches, Franziska
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Hoff, Holger
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Water implications of foreign direct investment in Ethiopia’s agricultural sector2012In: Water Alternatives, ISSN 1965-0175, E-ISSN 1965-0175, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 223-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethiopia is often highlighted as a country in which a lot of foreign land acquisition is occurring. The extent to which these investments also constitute significant acquisitions of water is the subject of this paper. It is apparent that water availability is a strong driver of the recent surge of investments in agricultural land globally, and in general the investments occur in countries with significant 'untapped' water resources. Ethiopia is no exception. We propose that the perception of unused and abundant water resources, as captured in dominant narratives, that drives and justifies both foreign and domestic investments, fails to reflect the more complex reality on the ground. Based on new collections of lease information and crop modelling, we estimate the potential additional water use associated with foreign investments at various scales. As a consequence of data limitations our analyses provide only crude estimates of consumptive water use and indicate a wide range of possible water consumption depending on exactly how foreign direct investment (FDI) development scenarios unfold. However, they do suggest that if all planned FDI schemes are implemented and expanded in the near future, additional water consumption is likely to be comparable with existing water use in non-FDI irrigation schemes, and a non-trivial proportion of the country’s water resources will be effectively utilised by foreign entities. Hence, additional water use as well as local water scarcity ought to be strong considerations in regulating or pricing land leases. If new investments are to increase local food and water security without compromising local and downstream water availability they should be designed to improve often very low agricultural water productivity, and to safeguard access of local populations to water.

  • 32.
    Brown, Ian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Polarimetric scattering from shallow firn and forests with snow cover2010In: Proceedings of the ESA Living Planet SymposiumBergen, Norway: (ESA SP-686, December 2010) / [ed] H. Lacoste-Francis, Noordwijk, Netherlands: European Space Agency , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the potential for inferring shallow firn depth from polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) data at L- and C-band is investigated. Using ALOS PALSAR and Radarsat-2 SAR imagery, and field data including Ground Penetrating Radar profiles and shallow cores, we investigate the spatial distribution of backscatter and decompose backscatter using polarimetric methods to analyse how polarimetric scattering is affected by firn depth near the firn line. The investigation is aimed at a more refined delineation of glacier firn lines and a better understanding of scattering from firn, superimposed ice and the bare ice facies. We found that PolSAR can be used to infer shallow firn thicknesses up to depths of at least 2 m water equivalent (m w.e.) and that old and contemporary firn surfaces can be differentiated using PolSAR. Contrary to many previous investigations the importance of surface scattering in the firn area is also emphasised in the scattering decompositions. Volume scattering was found to have a secondary or tertiary importance. This has important implications for the analysis of backscatter using semi-empirical models.The effect of snow depth on backscatter in pro-glacial a sub-Arctic forest and its potential for improving forest mapping is also discussed. Snow depth data were acquired by manual probing and snowpit measurements. In addition forest stand densities were assessed in situ and NDVI and tasseled cap transformations were made in optical remote sensing data (SPOT-4) to parameterise the forest. Scatterer decomposition and pedestal height products were found to be related to snowpack depth. It was not possible to separate the influences of snow cover and forest structure due to the partial dependence of the former on the latter. Nevertheless it can be concluded that PolSAR improves our ability to map the forest margins of low density, sub-Arctic forests. Our findings have implications for the implementation of algorithms for the exploitation of future SAR missions including Sentinel-1.

  • 33.
    Brüchert, Volker
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bonaglia, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Raymond, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Sediment med nyckelroll i näringsväven2014In: HavsUtsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, Vol. 1, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I sedimenten sker processer som kan vara helt avgörande för näringsbalansen i havsvattnet. Omvandlingen av fosfor till olika former är relativt väl känd, medan detaljerna i kvävets kretslopp är betydligt mindre kända. Mer än hälften av den årliga tillförseln av kväve till Östersjön beräknas omsättas till kvävgas i sedimentet, vilket sedan går förlorat för de flesta marina organismer.

  • 34.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    'The Frightened Land: Land,Landscape and Politics in South Africa in the twentieth Century': Book Review2009In: Urban Studies, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 235-238Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Börjeson, Lowe
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Berg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Open Access to Rural Landscapes!2014In: Rural Landscapes: Society, Environment, History, ISSN 2002-0104, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The academic study of rural landscapes covers a broad range of academic disciplines and thematic, methodological and theoretical concerns and interests; including questions concerned with resource use (e.g. agriculture, forestry, water and mining), settlement, livelihoods, conflicts, conservation, culture and identity. This diversity is clearly a strength (the rich empirical and intellectual base), but also presents a challenge, as the dissemination of research findings is distributed through a plethora of publishing channels, which do not necessarily encourage exchange of results and ideas that are not already perceived as germane to already established academic networks.

  • 36. Capek, Petr
    et al.
    Diakova, Katerina
    Dickopp, Jan-Erik
    Barta, Jiri
    Wild, Birgit
    Schnecker, Jörg
    Alves, Ricardo Jorge Eloy
    Aiglsdorfer, Stefanie
    Guggenberger, Georg
    Gentsch, Norman
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Lashchinsky, Nikolaj
    Gittel, Antje
    Schleper, Christa
    Mikutta, Robert
    Palmtag, Juri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Shibistova, Olga
    Urich, Tim
    Richter, Andreas
    Santruckova, Hana
    The effect of warming on the vulnerability of subducted organic carbon in arctic soils2015In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 90, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arctic permafrost soils contain large stocks of organic carbon (OC). Extensive cryogenic processes in these soils cause subduction of a significant part of OC-rich topsoil down into mineral soil through the process of cryoturbation. Currently, one-fourth of total permafrost OC is stored in subducted organic horizons. Predicted climate change is believed to reduce the amount of OC in permafrost soils as rising temperatures will increase decomposition of OC by soil microorganisms. To estimate the sensitivity of OC decomposition to soil temperature and oxygen levels we performed a 4-month incubation experiment in which we manipulated temperature (4-20 degrees C) and oxygen level of topsoil organic, subducted organic and mineral soil horizons. Carbon loss (C-LOSS) was monitored and its potential biotic and abiotic drivers, including concentrations of available nutrients, microbial activity, biomass and stoichiometry, and extracellular oxidative and hydrolytic enzyme pools, were measured. We found that independently of the incubation temperature, C-LOSS from subducted organic and mineral soil horizons was one to two orders of magnitude lower than in the organic topsoil horizon, both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This corresponds to the microbial biomass being lower by one to two orders of magnitude. We argue that enzymatic degradation of autochthonous subducted OC does not provide sufficient amounts of carbon and nutrients to sustain greater microbial biomass. The resident microbial biomass relies on allochthonous fluxes of nutrients, enzymes and carbon from the OC-rich topsoil. This results in a negative priming effect, which protects autochthonous subducted OC from decomposition at present. The vulnerability of subducted organic carbon in cryoturbated arctic soils under future climate conditions will largely depend on the amount of allochthonous carbon and nutrient fluxes from the topsoil.

  • 37.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Managing variability and scarcity. An analysis of Engaruka: A Maasai smallholder irrigation farming community2015In: Agricultural Water Management, ISSN 0378-3774, E-ISSN 1873-2283, Vol. 159, p. 318-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the common-pool regime of Engaruka, a smallholder irrigation farming community in northern Tanzania. Irrigation is a complex issue due to water asymmetry. Water use is regulated in Engaruka through boundary, allocation, input and penalty rules by a users’ association that controls and negotiates water allocation to avoid conflicts among headenders and tailenders. As different crops – maize and beans, bananas and vegetables – are cultivated, different watering schemes are applied depending on the water requirements of every single crop. Farmers benefit from different irrigation schedules and from different soil characteristics through having their plots both downstream and upstream. In fact, depending on water supply, cultivation is resourcefully extended and retracted. Engaruka is an ethnically homogeneous and interdependent community where headenders and tailenders are often the same people and are hence inhibited to carry out unilateral action. Drawing on common-pool resource literature, this study argues that in a context of population pressure alongside limited and fluctuating water availability, non-equilibrium behavior, consisting in negotiating water rights and modifying irrigation area continuously through demand management, is crucial for the satisfaction of basic and productive needs and for the avoidance of water conflicts.

  • 38. Caron, Patrick
    et al.
    Ferrero y de Loma-Osorio, Gabriel
    Nabarro, David
    Hainzelin, Etienne
    Guillou, Marion
    Andersen, Inger
    Arnold, Tom
    Astralaga, Margarita
    Beukeboom, Marcel
    Bickersteth, Sam
    Bwalya, Martin
    Caballero, Paula
    Campbell, Bruce M.
    Divine, Ntiokam
    Fan, Shenggen
    Frick, Martin
    Friis, Anette
    Gallagher, Martin
    Halkin, Jean-Pierre
    Hanson, Craig
    Lasbennes, Florence
    Ribera, Teresa
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schuepbach, Marlen
    Steer, Andrew
    Tutwiler, Ann
    Verburg, Gerda
    Food systems for sustainable development: proposals for a profound four-part transformation2018In: Agronomy for Sustainable Development, ISSN 1774-0746, E-ISSN 1773-0155, Vol. 38, no 4, article id 41Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence shows the importance of food systems for sustainable development: they are at the nexus that links food security, nutrition, and human health, the viability of ecosystems, climate change, and social justice. However, agricultural policies tend to focus on food supply, and sometimes, on mechanisms to address negative externalities. We propose an alternative. Our starting point is that agriculture and food systems' policies should be aligned to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This calls for deep changes in comparison with the paradigms that prevailed when steering the agricultural change in the XXth century. We identify the comprehensive food systems transformation that is needed. It has four parts: first, food systems should enable all people to benefit from nutritious and healthy food. Second, they should reflect sustainable agricultural production and food value chains. Third, they should mitigate climate change and build resilience. Fourth, they should encourage a renaissance of rural territories. The implementation of the transformation relies on (i) suitable metrics to aid decision-making, (ii) synergy of policies through convergence of local and global priorities, and (iii) enhancement of development approaches that focus on territories. We build on the work of the Milano Group, an informal group of experts convened by the UN Secretary General in Milan in 2015. Backed by a literature review, what emerges is a strategic narrative linking climate, agriculture and food, and calling for a deep transformation of food systems at scale. This is critical for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement. The narrative highlights the needed consistency between global actions for sustainable development and numerous local-level innovations. It emphasizes the challenge of designing differentiated paths for food systems transformation responding to local and national expectations. Scientific and operational challenges are associated with the alignment and arbitration of local action within the context of global priorities.

  • 39.
    Cavazzana, Annachiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics. Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
    Larsson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Hoffmann, Eileen
    Hummel, Thomas
    Haehner, Antje
    The vessel's shape influences the smell and taste of cola2017In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 59, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People's smell and taste perception is affected by different features of the vessel in which the beverage is served. In this study we focused on the container's shape and we investigated its impact on participants' olfactory and tasting ratings regarding a popular beverage, i.e., cola. We tested 100 healthy participants who evaluated both cola and sparkling water. These two beverages were presented in three different containers: a cola glass, a water glass and a plastic bottle. The results showed the presence of multisensory interactions between the smell and taste of the drinks and the type of vessel in which they were presented. Cola was perceived as more pleasant and intense when served in a typical coca-cola glass as compared to when it was presented in an incongruent container (i.e., water glass or plastic bottle). These results further support the view that our perception is modulated by the shape of the container in which the liquid is presented, strongly influencing the consumer's drinking experience.

  • 40.
    Celorio-Mancera, Maria de la Paz
    et al.
    Max Planck Society.
    Heckel, David G.
    Vogel, Heiko
    Transcriptional analysis of physiological pathways in a generalist herbivore: responses to different host plants and plant structures by the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera2012In: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, ISSN 0013-8703, E-ISSN 1570-7458, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 123-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The generalist cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), can consume host plants in more than 40 families, and often utilizes several tissues of a single plant. It is believed that generalists owe their success to the deployment of various members of multigene families of detoxification and digestive enzymes, a strategy that may also be responsible for rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. However, studies of generalist adaptations have been limited to specific genes or gene families, and an overview of how these adaptations are orchestrated at the transcriptional level is lacking. We used Drosophila melanogaster Meigen gene homology to H. armigera-expressed sequence tags to identify key groups of genes and pathways differentially regulated in the gut of fifth instars after 2 days of feeding on a variety of food sources. A series of microarray hybridizations was performed following two alternating loop designs, one comparing the gut gene expression upon feeding on various hosts (cotton, bean, tobacco, and chickpea) and two artificial diets (pinto bean and wheat germ-based), whereas the second design compared the gut expression toward feeding on various plant structures within cotton (leaf, square, and boll). The transcriptional responses toward bean and tobacco feeding treatments were more closely related in comparison with the rest of the diets, whereas the gene expression profiles toward cotton leaf and square-feeding were highly similar. We furthermore found significant changes in several pathways not directly responsible for detoxification mechanisms. Genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism, environmental information processing, and cellular processes were found to be differentially expressed. In addition, regulation of xenobiotic metabolism and the extracellular matrix-receptor pathways appeared differentially regulated across feeding treatments. Three cytochrome P450 genes – CYP6AE17, CYP6B6, and CYP9A17 – grouped as part of a xenobiotic metabolism pathway, were up-regulated in the bean-feeding treatment, and down-regulated in both tobacco and cotton-feeding treatments. CYP4L11, CYP4L5, and CYP4S13 were differentially expressed upon feeding on different cotton plant structures. The present work provides host plant and plant structure-specific transcriptional responses in a lepidopteran herbivore, including pathways and gene candidates for future studies of H. armigera physiology under a more integrative ecologically meaningful framework.

  • 41. Cerrato, Riccardo
    et al.
    Salvatore, Maria Cristina
    Gunnarson, Björn E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Linderholm, Hans W.
    Carturan, Luca
    Brunetti, Michele
    De Blasi, Fabrizio
    Baroni, Carlo
    A Pinus cembra L. tree-ring record for late spring to late summer temperature in the Rhaetian Alps, Italy2019In: Dendrochronologia, ISSN 1125-7865, E-ISSN 1612-0051, Vol. 53, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ongoing climate change strongly affects high-elevation environments in the European Alps, influencing the cryosphere and the biosphere and causing widespread retreat of glaciers and changes in biomes. Nevertheless, high-elevation areas often lack long meteorological series, and global datasets cannot represent local variations well. Thus, proxy data, such as tree rings, provide information on past climatic variations from these remote sites. Although maximum latewood density (MXD) chronologies provide better temperature information than those based on tree-ring width (TRW), MXD series from the European Alps are lacking. To derive high-quality temperature information for the Rhaetian Alps, Pinus cembra L. trees sampled at approximately 2000 m a.s.l. were used to build one MXD chronology spanning from 1647 to 2015. The MXD data were significantly and highly correlated with seasonal May-September mean temperatures. The MXD chronology showed a generally positive trend since the middle of the 19th century, interrupted by short phases of climatic deterioration in the beginning of the 20th century and in the 1970s, conforming with the temperature trends. Our results underline the potential for using Pinus cembra L. MXD to reconstruct mean temperature variations, especially during the onset and latter part of the growing season, providing additional information on parts of the growing season not inferred from TRW. Future studies on MXD for this species will increase the availability of temporal and spatial data, allowing detailed climate reconstructions.

  • 42.
    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    1600-talet – det kallaste århundradet2011In: Sveriges historia : 1600–1721 / [ed] Nils Erik Villstrand, Stockholm: Norstedts , 2011, p. 441-445Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Global nedkylning: klimatet och människan under 10 000 år2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Klimatet har förändrats både regionalt och globalt sedan senaste istiden tog slut, ofta med dramatiska konsekvenser för naturen och människan. Fastän det talas så mycket om klimatförändringar idag är det få som vet särskilt mycket om hur klimatet har varierat förr.

    Det är först under de senaste åren som forskningen börjat kunna beskriva vad som faktiskt hänt med klimatet under olika tider, på olika platser. Historikern Fredrik Charpentier Ljungqvist har tagit ett samlat grepp på den senaste forskningen och resultatet är en resa i vått och torrt, i hetta och kyla, jorden runt under 10 000 år. Vi får stifta bekantskap med många olika folk och kulturer – babylonier, romare, mayaindianer och vikingar – som alla under historiens gång varit utsatta för klimatförändringar.

  • 44.
    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Klimatkris på medeltiden2009In: Populär Historia, ISSN 1102-0822, no 12, p. 48-52Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45. Cheung, William W. L.
    et al.
    Frolicher, Thomas L.
    Asch, Rebecca G.
    Jones, Miranda C.
    Pinsky, Malin L.
    Reygondeau, Gabriel
    Rodgers, Keith B.
    Rykaczewski, Ryan R.
    Sarmiento, Jorge L.
    Stock, Charles
    Watson, James R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Princeton University, USA.
    Building confidence in projections of the responses of living marine resources to climate change2016In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 1283-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights that climate change and ocean acidification are challenging the sustainable management of living marine resources (LMRs). Formal and systematic treatment of uncertainty in existing LMR projections, however, is lacking. We synthesize knowledge of how to address different sources of uncertainty by drawing from climate model intercomparison efforts. We suggest an ensemble of available models and projections, informed by observations, as a starting point to quantify uncertainties. Such an ensemble must be paired with analysis of the dominant uncertainties over different spatial scales, time horizons, and metrics. We use two examples: (i) global and regional projections of Sea Surface Temperature and (ii) projection of changes in potential catch of sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) in the 21st century, to illustrate this ensemble model approach to explore different types of uncertainties. Further effort should prioritize understanding dominant, undersampled dimensions of uncertainty, as well as the strategic collection of observations to quantify, and ultimately reduce, uncertainties. Our proposed framework will improve our understanding of future changes in LMR and the resulting risk of impacts to ecosystems and the societies under changing ocean conditions.

  • 46. Collen, Pi Nyvall
    et al.
    Collen, Jonas
    Reis, Marcelo da Silva
    Pedersen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Setubal, Joao C.
    Varani, Alessandro M.
    Colepicolo, Pio
    Oliveira, Mariana C.
    Analysis of expressed sequence tags from the agarophyte Gracilaria tenuistipitata (Rhodophyta)2012In: Journal of Applied Phycology, ISSN 0921-8971, E-ISSN 1573-5176, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 641-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 3,631 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were established from two size-selected cDNA libraries made from the tetrasporophytic phase of the agarophytic red alga Gracilaria tenuistipitata. The average sizes of the inserts in the two libraries were 1,600 bp and 600 bp, with an average length of the edited sequences of 850 bp. Clustering gave 2,387 assembled sequences with a redundancy of 53%. Of the ESTs, 65% had significant matches to sequences deposited in public databases, 11% to proteins without known function, and 35% were novel. The most represented ESTs were a Na/K-transporting ATPase, a hedgehog-like protein, a glycine dehydrogenase and an actin. Most of the identified genes were involved in primary metabolism and housekeeping. The largest functional group was thus genes involved in metabolism with 14% of the ESTs; other large functional categories included energy, transcription, and protein synthesis and destination. The codon usage was examined using a subset of the data, and the codon bias was found to be limited with all codon combinations used.

  • 47.
    Cornell Kärnekull, Stina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Jönsson, Fredrik U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
    Willander, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University College of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sikström, Sverker
    Larsson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Long-Term Memory for Odors: Influences of Familiarity and Identification Across 64 Days2015In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have investigated long-term odor recognition memory, although some early observations suggested that the forgetting rate of olfactory representations is slower than for other sensory modalities. This study investigated recognition memory across 64 days for high and low familiar odors and faces. Memory was assessed in 83 young participants at 4 occasions; immediate, 4, 16, and 64 days after encoding. The results indicated significant forgetting for odors and faces across the 64 days. The forgetting functions for the 2 modalities were not fundamentally different. Moreover, high familiar odors and faces were better remembered than low familiar ones, indicating an important role of semantic knowledge on recognition proficiency for both modalities. Although odor recognition was significantly better than chance at the 64 days testing, memory for the low familiar odors was relatively poor. Also, the results indicated that odor identification consistency across sessions, irrespective of accuracy, was positively related to successful recognition.

  • 48.
    Crona, Beatrice I.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of East Anglia, UK.
    Swartz, Wilf
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Thyresson, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Masked, diluted and drowned out: how global seafood trade weakens signals from marine ecosystems2016In: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 1175-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly 40% of seafood is traded internationally and an even bigger proportion is affected by international trade, yet scholarship on marine fisheries has focused on global trends in stocks and catches, or on dynamics of individual fisheries, with limited attention to the link between individual fisheries, global trade and distant consumers. This paper examines the usefulness of fish price as a feedback signal to consumers about the state of fisheries and marine ecosystems. We suggest that the current nature of fisheries systems and global markets prevent transmission of such price signals from source fisheries to consumers. We propose several mechanisms that combine to weaken price signals, and present one example - the North Sea cod - to show how these mechanisms can be tested. The lack of a reliable price feedback to consumers represents a challenge for sustainable fisheries governance. We therefore propose three complimentary approaches to address the missing feedback: (i) strengthening information flow through improved traceability and visibility of individual fishers to consumers, (ii) capitalizing on the changing seafood trade structures and (iii) bypassing and complementing market mechanisms by directly targeting citizens and political actors regarding marine environmental issues through publicity and information campaigns. These strategies each havelimitations and thus need to be pursued together to address the challenge of sustainability in global marine fisheries.

  • 49.
    Cullhed, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    The Garden against History: Reflections on the Hortus Conclusus Theme in Premodern Literature2010In: Bulletin för trädgårdshistorisk forskning, ISSN 1652-2362, no 23, p. 6-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50. Da, Chau Thi
    et al.
    Phuoc, Le Huu
    Duc, Huynh Ngoc
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Berg, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Use of Wastewater from Striped Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) Pond Culture for Integrated Rice-Fish-Vegetable Farming Systems in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam2015In: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, ISSN 2168-3565, E-ISSN 2168-3573, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 580-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the feasibility of reusing wastewater from striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) pond culture as nutrient input for integrated rice-Nile tilapia-green bean farming systems, and to what extent this could contribute to decreasing the environmental impacts on water quality from the striped catfish industry in the Mekong Delta. Four treatments in triplicates were used to investigate the growth of rice and green bean varieties under different combinations of inorganic fertilizer and water from the river and a striped catfish pond culture. The Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was cultured at low density without feeding in a canal adjacent to the rice field. Rice yields ranged from 3,514 to 4,023 kg ha(-1) with no significant differences between treatments (p > 0.05). The yield of green bean ranged from 2,671 to 3,282 kg ha(-1) (p < 0.05), with the highest yields for beans only receiving water from the striped catfish pond. The water quality concentrations decreased significantly when passing through the rice plots for almost all treatments (p < 0.05). Total phosphorus and nitrogen levels in the outflowing water were reduced by almost 50% compared to the inflowing water from the striped catfish pond. Overall, the results indicated that an integrated system generates both economic and environmental benefits as compared to monocultures.

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