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  • 1.
    Ahrén, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Lager, Anton
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ungdomars psykosociala hälsa2012In: Den orättvisa hälsan: Om socioekonomiska skillnader i hälsa och livslängd / [ed] Mikael Rostila, Susanna Toivanen, Stockholm: Liber, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Bengt-Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Human Development, Learning and Special Education .
    Strander, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Human Development, Learning and Special Education .
    Framtiden blev vår: 101 sjuttiotalister följda under sina 25 första år2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenska barn har det generellt sett mycket bra. Ändå vet vi att en del individer drabbas av större sårbarhet och sämre utveckling. Går det att identifiera vilka faktorer under barns och ungdomars uppväxt det är som verkar uppbyggande repktive nedbrytande? Vilken betydelse har förskolan och skolan? Familjeförhållanden? I denna andra rapport fokuserar författarna på 101 barns utvecklingsgång under hela livsperioden 1-25 år och utvecklingsprocessens betydelse för dem som unga vuxna.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Bengt-Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Human Development, Learning and Special Education .
    Strander, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Human Development, Learning and Special Education .
    Skolan, familjen och framtiden: social sårbarhet hos unga2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur går det i livet för unga människor som upplevt misslyckanden i skolan? I denna första rapport från FABASKO-projektet analyseras enkätmaterial från en stor grupp 25-åringar. Ungdomarna besvarade första gången enkäter när de var 18 år gamla och gick på gymnsiet.

    Syftet är att få en bild av hur dessa unga vuxna anpassat sig till sin vuxenroll och till samhällets krav på dem. Författarna försöker också ta reda på om vissa av dem kan antas vara mer utsatta än andra och se vad som karaktäriserar denna grupp.

  • 4.
    Arturson, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Vrede, Nathalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    "För det är inga stenar vi håller på med”: En intervjustudie om behandlingsalliansens roll och hur behandlare arbetar med behandlingsalliansen i mötet med barn.2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment alliance has been described in the field of research to play an important role in the recovery of patients in psychiatric care. However there has been relatively little research concerning the treatment alliance specifically with children. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the role of the treatment alliance and how professionals work with the treatment alliance with children. Data was collected using qualitative interviews with six professionals from different Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Intermediate Care units located in Stockholm. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. The themes that emerged were; The different dimensions of the treatment alliance, To create entrances and To take care of a treatment alliance. The theoretical tools that were used to interpret the results of this study were role theory and concepts from Child Alliance Process Theory. Our conclusions showed that professionals need to develop a treatment alliance not only with the child but also with their parents. Professionals also described the work with the treatment alliance as a two-part process that contains ways for professionals to develop and nurture the treatment alliance with children.

  • 5. Austers, Ivars
    Perspectives of ethnic group attributions2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bakhshayesh, Bahareh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    THE FEMALE ADVANTAGE: Gender and Self-presentational Strategies in the Judicial System2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Warmth and competence are two universal dimensions underlying social perception. A negative relationship exists between the two dimensions in group/person perception: the “compensation effect”, such that when two individual/groups are compared/judged, the one judged more positively on one dimension is also judged less positively on the other dimension. This study explored whether men and women use warmth and competence in a compensatory way when managing impression in a judicial context. Moderating effects of ambivalent sexism was also investigated. Participants (N=123) partook in a webbased survey, and were randomly assigned either the role of suspect or witness to a crime. Results showed that women tended to display higher warmth and lower competence when expecting to be interrogated as a suspect, compared to witness, suggesting compensation. Men did not differ in their intended self-presentation across the two situations. It can therefore be concluded, that men and women do engage in impression management and display different traits according to assigned role.

  • 7. Beier, Susanne
    et al.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oehmann, Verena
    Fiedler, Peter
    Fiedler, Klaus
    Influence of judges' behaviors on perceived procedural justice2014In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, ISSN 0021-9029, E-ISSN 1559-1816, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 46-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of judges' behaviors on procedural justice was analyzed in a field study, observing the judges' behaviors during n=129 trials and assessing the defendants and the audiences' justice perceptions. The observed judicial behavior was unrelated to the defendants' justice perceptions. However, the more respectful the judge treated the defendants, the fairer the audience perceived the trial. In general, the effect size of the relationship between observational measures and subjective justice ratings was small in comparison to the relationship within defendants' or audiences' ratings. There were striking differences in the justice perception between the two data sources, namely defendants and audience. Thus, the source matters, and to avoid a same-source bias, should be taken into account when analyzing justice perceptions.

  • 8.
    Bergman Blix, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Arlie Russell Hochschild2013In: Relationell socialpsykologi: klassiska och samtida teorier / [ed] Henrik Stenberg & Bo Isenberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 166-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    The Accuracy of Mathematical Models of Justice Evaluations2012In: The Journal of mathematical sociology, ISSN 0022-250X, E-ISSN 1545-5874, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 125-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jasso (1978) proposed a universal law of justice evaluations describing a logarithmic relationship between the perceived injustice of a reward and the ratio between this reward and the just reward. In applications this model is treated as if it were exact, whereas analogous models in psychophysics have empirically established degrees of uncertainty. In this article I make the first assessment of the magnitude of error in the logarithmic model of justice evaluations, using published data and a novel experiment. For the standard application of the model, where just rewards are inferred from justice evaluations, I find that the inherent inaccuracy leads to errors of about 15% on average. I also compared the logarithmic model to 2 nonlogarithmic models. Almost 20% of my respondents made justice evaluations that were more consistent with one of the latter models, suggesting that no single model is really universal.

  • 10.
    Falkenström, Erica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Vad vill du - egentligen? Om mål och mening i livet2017 (ed. 2)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11. Ferrer, Julio
    I väntan på döden: en etnologisk undersökning av åldringarnas situation på en långvårdsavdelning (1976-1977)1981Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Fork, Susanna
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Självets positioner: lidande och konflikt som föreställningssystem1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Franzén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Then she got a spanking': Social accountability and narrative versions in social workers' courtroom testimonies2018In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 577-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Courtroom talk in child custody interrogations recurrently features contrasting event descriptions about what happened', as well as contrasting person descriptions. This case study - from a large set of audio-recorded courtroom examinations - documents how social workers' contrasting narrative versions about alleged domestic violence are related to divergent problem formulations. Blame-account sequences feature descriptions of a particular event as violent or nonviolent and descriptions of a new partner as non-adult' or merely as impulsive' but concerned'. Other contrasting person descriptions feature a target child either as normal' or as someone who has a diagnosis'. This involves categorizations of the particular child either as a victim (normal child') or as someone with a diagnosis', two contrasting accounts that provide divergent explanatory formulations of what the overall problem is. Ultimately, divergent testimonies also reflect how social accounts in court reflect both mitigated/aggravated descriptions of violence and divergent accounts of parents' and children's agency and accountability.

  • 14.
    Gartz, Mira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Desire, cows and resilience: Investigating motivations to steward a bio-cultural refuge in Northern Sweden2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, centuries of agricultural modernization have marginalized locally adapted food cultures and food production systems. Yet in some places these practices and cultures survive, even in areas that lack conducive circumstances for agricultural production. These places are called bio-cultural refugia.

    Dominant agricultural practices are based on the production of only a few species which reduce biodiversity and the resilience of landscapes. Bio-cultural refugia provide important alternatives and pathways toward sustainable agricultural development, but are currently conceived of as living museums and are not well-connected to markets. This study investigates a re-emerging bio-cultural refuge in Northern Sweden, which revolves around an endangered native cattle breed, traditional recipes and an open landscape.

    It is unclear how bio-cultural refugia emerge or can persist. Recent literature on human adaptive capacity in social-ecological systems explains how sustainability outcomes depend on the dynamic interrelations of opportunities, abilities and desires. In this thesis I empirically investigate the role of desires to stewardship practices through a discourse analysis with roots in psychoanalytic theory. The aim of the thesis is to add to the understanding of how and why a bio-cultural refuge can emerge and persist in the Global North.

    I find that desires expressed by stewards in the bio-cultural refuge is mostly directed to people, and not to achieve ecological sustainability for its own sake. The most commonly articulated motivation is to care for people in the village by developing the local economy, contradicting a general conception of stewardship originating in pro-environmental values. Nevertheless, the informants do steward a bio-cultural refuge. This is explained by the coincidental opportunity to buy the native cattle and existing subsidies to keep them, and by abilities such as farming- and cooperation skills, creativity and entrepreneurial thinking.

    Stewardship of bio-cultural refugia is crucial for biosphere resilience. In order to maintain and develop existing bio-cultural refugia we must start to re-imagine what they can mean not only for ecologies but also for society and people, as they hold important knowledge on energy efficient food production. By creating opportunities that resonate with people’s needs and desires in particular places it may be possible to attract new stewards for bio-cultural refugia, and to (re)produce the ecological knowledge that is necessary for a sustainable and resilient future

  • 15.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Masker och riter: ordlösa språk1985In: FENIX: Tidskrift för humanism, ISSN 0280-8617, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 129-159Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Våldet i hemmen1978In: Svensk Tidskrift, ISSN ISSN 0039-677X, no 2, p. 67-73Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence of domestic violence and child abuse in Sweden seen from a legal, historical and psychological viewpoint.

  • 17.
    Hossenfelder, Sabine
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    How to Save the World2016In: How Should Humanity Steer the Future? / [ed] Anthony Aguirre, Brendan Foster, Zeeya Merali, Springer, 2016, p. 5-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If you knew how humanity should steer the future, what difference would it make? The major challenge that humanity faces today is not that we lack ideas for what to do, as I am sure this essay contest will document. No, the major challenge, the mother of all problems, is to convert these ideas into courses of action. We fail to act in the face of global problems because we do not have an intuitive grasp on the consequences of collective human behavior, are prone to cognitive biases, and easily overwhelmed by data. We are also lazy and if intuition fails us, inertia takes over. Howmany people will read these brilliant essays? For the individual, evaluating possible courses of action to address interrelated problems in highly connected social, economic and ecological networks is presently too costly. The necessary information may exist, even be accessible, but it is too expensive in terms of time and energy. To steer the future, information about our dynamical and multi-layered networks has to become cheap and almost effortless to use. Only then, when we can make informed decisions by feeling rather than thinking, will we be able to act and respond to the challenges we face.

  • 18.
    Johnson, Maarit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Patterns of extreme responses to items in self-esteem scales: Does conceptualisation and item content matter?2013In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 622-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-esteem (SE) scales are particularly susceptible for various response-sets. Systematic response alterations, often mirroring self-presentational item characteristics, can be triggered differentially depending on the content of items in a scale. The present study examined extreme responding to items in the global SE scale (Rosenberg, 1965) and the basic SE scale (Forsman & Johnson, 1996). The results showed that global SE scores were determined to a higher extent by extreme responses, in particular rejecting negative item content, than basic self-esteem scores. The implications of self-presentation contra self-esteem for an asymmetry in response patterns between the two scales are discussed.

  • 19. Keenan, Mickey
    et al.
    Dillenburger, Karola
    Röttgers, Hanns Rüdiger
    Dounavi, Katerina
    Jónsdóttir, Sigríður Lóa
    Moderato, Paolo
    Schenk, Jacqueline J. A. M.
    Virués-Ortega, Javier
    Roll Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Martin, Neil
    Autism and ABA: The Gulf between North America and Eurpe2015In: Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, ISSN 2195-7177, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 167-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prevalence estimations for Autism Spectrum Disorder have been increasing over the past few years with rates now reported to be at 1:68. Interventions that are based on Applied Behaviour Analysis are significantly related to best outcomes and are widely considered ‘treatment as usual’ in North America. In Europe, this is not the case, instead a rather ill-defined ‘eclectic’ approach is widely promoted and in this paper we discuss some of the roots of this gulf between Europe and North America and correct some of the misconceptions that prevail about Applied Behaviour Analysis in Europe.

  • 20.
    Lindstein, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att utveckla social kompetens1979Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Lundman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences.
    Socioekonomisk differentiering i grundskolan: Socio-economic differentiation in comprehensive schools1979Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 22. Markovsky, Barry
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Comparing direct and indirect measures of just rewards: what have we learned?2012In: Sociological Methods & Research, ISSN 0049-1241, E-ISSN 1552-8294, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 240-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Jasso argued that her indirect method for inferring just rewards ispreferable to direct methods because the former is less susceptibleto biases. We pointed out that this claim was merely speculative andthat old and new evidence show both methods to be susceptible tosevere biases.

    2. Results from our research found that the two methods were uncorre-lated over the identical set of stimuli, and hence at least one of themethods must be very unreliable. Of the two methods, only the indi-rect method inferred just rewards that were implausibly extreme, astrong indication that it is the less reliable. This was evident inresults that Jasso reported in 2008 but did not address at that time.

    3. Direct and indirect methods both must assume that respondents havein mind just rewards for practically any set of contextual factors. This assumption is both unproven and implausible. The alternativeassumption is that respondents use contextual cues to help them ren-der fairness judgments but, as a consequence, their judgments arebiased by those cues.

    4. We noted that anchoring theory specifies conditions for the occur-rence of biases due to the presence of anchor information in thejudgment context. These conditions are satisfied in Jasso’s vignettemethod. Predictably, results both from prior research and from ournew research indicated strong anchoring biases for both direct andindirect justice vignette measures.

    5. The indirect method uses a statistical model whose specification dif-fers from the theoretical model that it ostensibly implements. Thisspecification error introduces biases of its own

  • 23. Motka, Franziska
    et al.
    Grüne, Bettina
    Sleczka, Pawel
    Braun, Barbara
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Who uses self-exclusion to regulate problem gambling? A systematic literature review2018In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 903-916Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Self-exclusion programs offer an intervention for individuals with problem gambling behavior. However, these programs are insufficiently used. This review describes sociodemographic features and gambling behavior of self-excluders as well as goals and motives for initiating self-exclusion from terrestrial and online gambling. In addition, use of further professional help and barriers to self-exclusion are examined.

    METHODS: Based on systematic literature search and quality assessment, n = 16 original studies (13 quantitative, 2 qualitative, and 1 mixed method) published between 1997 and 2017 in English or German language were analyzed. Results are presented for online and terrestrial gambling separately.

    RESULTS: Online self-excluders were on average 10 years younger than terrestrial self-excluders. Self-exclusion was mainly motivated by financial problems, followed by feelings of losing control and problems with significant others. Financial problems and significant others were less important for online than for terrestrial gamblers. Main barriers for self-exclusion were complicated enrollment processes, lack of complete exclusion from all venues, little support from venue staff, and lack of adequate information on self-exclusion programs. Both self-excluders from terrestrial and online gambling had negative attitudes toward the need of professional addiction care.

    CONCLUSION: To exploit the full potential of self-exclusion as a measure of gambler protection, its acceptance and its utilization need to be increased by target-group-specific information addressing financial issues and the role of significant others, simplifying the administrative processes, facilitating self-exclusion at an early stage of the gambling career, offering self-determined exclusion durations, and promoting additional use of professional addiction care.

  • 24.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Talet om mångfald i svensk utbildning2008In: Främlingskap och tolkning: en vänbok till Charles Westin / [ed] Anders Gustavsson, Sonja Olin Lauritzen, Per-Johan Ödman, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2008, p. 132-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Reissner, V.
    et al.
    Kokkevi, A.
    Shifano, F.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). University of Melbourne, Australia; Turning Point Alcohol & Drug Centre, Australia.
    Storbjörk, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Stohler, R.
    DiFuria, L.
    Rehm, J.
    Geyer, M.
    Hölscher, F.
    Scherbaum, N.
    Differences in drug consumption, comorbidity and health service use of opioid addicts across six European urban regions (TREAT-project)2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 455-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This comparative study investigated consumption patterns, comorbidity and treatment utilization of opioid addicts in six European cities (Athens, Essen, London, Padua, Stockholm, Zurich). Subjects and methods: Data were collected by structured face-to-face interviews. The representative sample comprises 599 addicts (100 patients per centre, 99 in London) at the start of a treatment episode. Results: Patients were dependent on opioids for about 10 years. Regional differences were significant regarding the patients' drug consumption pattern and their method of heroin administration (up to a fourth of the patients in Essen, London and Zurich usually smoke heroin). Concomitant use of benzodiazepines, cannabis and alcohol was common in all regions with the German and English samples showing the highest level of polydrug use. The prevalence of major depression was high in all regions (50%). Stockholm and London patients worry most about their physical health. Differences in the amount of needle sharing and especially in the use of public health service were prominent between the sites. Opioid addiction was a long-term disorder associated with a high burden of comorbidity and social problems in all cities. Conclusion: The results of the study show significant interregional differences of opioid addicts which might require different treatment strategies in European countries to handle the problem.

  • 26.
    Sandberg, Linn J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    “Love the kin you’re in?”: Kin network responses to women and children experiencing intimate partner violence2016In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 444-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intimate partner violence is often known to a wider social network. Still little research exists on the experiences of social networks, how they respond and how women and children experiencing intimate partner violence perceive these responses. This article draws on 16 qualitative interviews with women victims of intimate partner violence, intimate partner violence-exposed children and their relatives in three kin networks. The overall aim of this article is to study responses to intimate partner violence from a multivocal perspective where the possibly concurring and conflicting perspectives of both the victims and the networks are heard. More specifically, the article explores what responses are perceived as possible/impossible to end violence and create safety for women and children. The article shows how masculinity, in intersection with kin position and age, figures both as an obstacle and a possibility to end intimate partner violence. Moreover, the article shows that responses are shaped from intersections of age, kin and gender in victims, more specifically understandings of maturity and adulthood of female victims and how this linked to responsible motherhood. The study provided insights into responses to intimate partner violence as co-constructed in a wider social network and how a focus on multivocality may be useful for understanding the multidimensional character of responses to intimate partner violence.

  • 27. Stanley, Nicky
    et al.
    Barter, Christine
    Wood, Martha
    Aghtaie, Nadia
    Larkins, Cath
    Lanau, Alba
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Pornography, sexual coersion and abuse, and sexting in Young people’s intimate relationships: A European study2018In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 33, no 19, p. 2919-2944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technology has made pornography increasingly accessible to young people, and a growing evidence base has identified a relationship between viewing pornography and violent or abusive behavior in young men. This article reports findings from a large survey of 4,564 young people aged 14 to 17 in five European countries which illuminate the relationship between regular viewing of online pornography, sexual coercion and abuse and the sending and receiving of sexual images and messages, known as “sexting.” In addition to the survey, which was completed in schools, 91 interviews were undertaken with young people who had direct experience of interpersonal violence and abuse in their own relationships. Rates for regularly viewing online pornography were very much higher among boys and most had chosen to watch pornography. Boys’ perpetration of sexual coercion and abuse was significantly associated with regular viewing of online pornography. Viewing online pornography was also associated with a significantly increased probability of having sent sexual images/messages for boys in nearly all countries. In addition, boys who regularly watched online pornography were significantly more likely to hold negative gender attitudes. The qualitative interviews illustrated that, although sexting is normalized and perceived positively by most young people, it has the potential to reproduce sexist features of pornography such as control and humiliation. Sex and relationships education should aim to promote a critical understanding of pornography among young people that recognizes its abusive and gendered values.

  • 28.
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Fra asosial til sosial psykiatri?2015In: Psykisk helse: Nye arenaer, aktører og tilnærminger / [ed] D. Ulland, A.B. Thorod & E. Ulland, Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 2015, p. 240-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social capital, human capital and parent-child relation quality: interacting for children's educational achievement2015In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 996-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data. We find that parents with more human capital tended to offer their children more social capital. OLS regressions show that, when present, social capital was directly related to children's grades and its utility for achievement did not depend on parents' human capital. The utility of social capital was enhanced when combined with a very good parent-child relation.

  • 30.
    Wiklund, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olin, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Social interaktion i den minimala gruppsituationen leder inte till mer särbehandling2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Individer har en systematisk tendens att favorisera medlemmar i ens egen grupp och diskriminera de som tillhör en annan grupp, trots minimala grunder för gruppindelning. Denna studie syftar till att undersöka om social interaktion mellan individer i grupper påverkar denna särbehandlingstendens. I sådana fall, kan detta komma att yttra sig genom bland annat skillnader i kunskapsutbyte och spridning av information mellan de anställda på en arbetsplats. Grupper delades in slumpmässigt och särbehandlingen mättes via poängfördelning. Datainsamlingen skedde via både experiment (n = 41) och enkät (n = 135) samt med tre olika nivåer av social interaktion. Undersökningsdeltagarna fördelade mer poäng till sin egen grupp, än till den andra gruppen. Däremot påverkade varken grad av social interaktion eller typ av metod poängfördelningen. Vid samtliga tillfällen var det mellan en tredjedel till strax över hälften av undersökningsdeltagarna som särbehandlade. Slutsatsen är att även vid en slumpmässig gruppindelning så kommer en särbehandlingstendens att ske.

  • 31.
    Winerdal, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lindholm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The quality of question types in Swedish police interviews with young suspects of serious crimes2019In: The Police Journal, ISSN 0032-258X, E-ISSN 1740-5599, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 136-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how juvenile offenders in Sweden between the age of 15 and 17 are interviewed by police officers when suspected of homicide crimes. The quality of question types was assessed in 47 authentic interviews. The findings show that the police officers used option-posing and suggestive questions most frequently and social pressure was used in three predominating ways: to confront, to challenge and to appeal for a confession. The conclusion is that the police officers’ question style to a large extent contradicts recommendations for how to interview children. There is therefore a need to develop an evidence-based interview practice for interviewing young suspects.

  • 32. Åström, Thomas
    I kraftfältet kring handikapp: moralpositioneringar och teori om social positionering2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
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