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  • 1.
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Linikko, Jari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Learning technologies and special educational needs: a liiterature review of empirical research2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning technologies are used in educational settings as tools to communicate, design learning environments, and stimulate learning processes. Many of these tools are applied in the field of special educational needs.  We have identified several types of applications that have been reported in scientific international journals as technology-enhanced learning, augmentative and alternative communication, computer-assisted instruction,  interventions with computer-based games, multi-user virtual environment  (as virtual case, visualization and simulation activities), web-based inquiry learning, computer-supported collaborative learning, application software, digital literacy, learning platforms, e- learning and mobile learning. These developments in the field of learning technologies should be introduced in teacher training and in particular in special needs education training, since several of these technologies may be momentous in improving education for students with learning disabilities.  This study wants to contribute to synthesize the research in these subjects in order to disseminate knowledge and in order to stimulate to further research in this field in  teacher training. In fact, despite the rapid growth of technological applications in the Swedish schools, where many students have access to an own PC, the contents of the teacher programs are always adapted to the new, technology-enhanced educational conditions that are nowadays common in the schools. A literature review of research is valuable also to investigate which evidence that is available for the efficacy of various methods.  The literature review aim is to encourage a scientific approach on these matters, which means also a rigorous scrutiny of results. Besides the risk connected to a lack of knowledge, in fact, there is also the risk that commercial interests and marketing will influence investments in the educational sector, to a greater extent than research evidence. A comprehensive theoretical framework for the literature review has been Universal Design for Learning (Rose & Gravel, 2010, CUDE, 2012). Under this concept different didactic approaches fit that offer multiple means of representation and communication, using a variety of resources for activities and expression, and create numerous ways of engagement. ULD is based on principles that are fundamental for all learning and teaching activities. It provides the opportunity to explore a wide range of possibilities and processes related to the theme of inclusive education (inclusion) that strives for objectives of an equal education and to reduce barriers to learning. The aims are to investigate a) which  learning technologies have been developed and are reported in research; b) which theoretical models and concepts are employed in empirical studies of learning technologies and special educational needs; c) to make a mapping of the contents of the field; d) to make a synthesis of research results within a specific area e) to develop a database of research literature to identify questions and issues for future research (interventions, replication of quasi-experimental studies).

    The study has followed the recommended approach for systematic reviews (CRD, 2009, Gough, Oliver, & Thomas, 2012; Roberts & Petticrew, 2006, SBU, 2011). The searches were conducted mainly in databases that collect suitable Journals on special educational needs and learning technologies (EBSCO, Scopus) during the autumn 2012. Other databases at universities, research institutes, national and international authorities were also searched (e.g. OECD, EPPI, EIPPEE, European Agency for Special Needs Education, The Swedish National Agency for Education, Becta). The reference found was exported to an online database established in RefWorks (2012). A title- and abstract review of about 1300 references were performed according to a protocol. Required inclusion criteria concern population, educational context, special educational needs content, type of technology application, language and availability. The included references were sorted and reviewed in full text. The protocol for the full text review include: methods, subjects, type of special educational needs, relevance for the local educational context, quality. The literature review will map the existent research that is relevant for the special educational needs field and will synthesize the research conducted within a more specific area. Possible candidates are: a) serious games for numeracy, prevention of reading difficulties, training of working memory; b) virtual simulations. We expect that the results of the literature review willl be taken into account in teacher training and special educational needs training

  • 2.
    Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH.
    Persson, Christian
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
    Meeting the users’ need for knowledge:  A concept of a learning domain2005In: Allestädes närvarande kunskap: Doktorsavhandling i Medieteknik och grafisk produktion, Stockholm: KTH Datavetenskap och kommunikation , 2005, 185-200 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In everyday life, many people use the web as a resource for knowledge. In this paper we are investigating the preconditions for a web resource called learning domain. The characteristics of the web resource learning domain can contribute to a reduction of well-known problems with structuring the content in a communicative way and also to contribute to an increased trust of the presented information. In the paper the characteristics of learning domains are described and some examples of web sites with characteristics contiguous to that of a learning domain are discussed. Our conclusions are that web resources with learning domain characteristics can contribute as a knowledge support. The challenge related to learning domains is not a technological one but instead how to arrange the information in such a way that it makes sense for the users.

  • 3.
    Anrin, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Det måste vara intressant!: En kvalitativ studie om fritidspedagogers villkor kring att arbeta med IKT.2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna uppsats har varit att undersöka villkoren för fritidspedagoger att arbeta med informations- och kommunikationsteknik (nedan förkortat IKT) på fritidshemmet med hjälp av en kvalitativ metod (intervjuer). Det teoretiska perspektiv som studien utgått ifrån är fenomenologi, och därav blev resultatet av min uppsats tre livsvärldar inom IKT som informanterna i studien konstruerade. Dessa tre livsvärldar blev motivation, förutsättningar och kunskap. De informanter som konstruerat dessa livsvärldar är 4 fritidspedagoger och 3 personer som har IKT-ansvar som en del av sina arbetsdagar. Resultatet visade att de tre kategorierna gick in i varandra, men tyngdpunkten låg ändå i kategorin motivation. Fritidspedagogers arbete med IKT är beroende av hur pass motiverade och drivna de är som pedagoger kring just fenomenet IKT. Att vissa förutsättningar saknas, som till exempel planeringstid eller kunskaper kring området, påverkar också i hur stor utsträckning pedagoger använder IKT. Slutsatsen blir därför att användandet av IKT på fritidshem beror dels på hur motiverade fritidspedagogerna är kring att söka kunskap och arbeta med IKT, dels på hur starkt motiverad ledningen på skolorna är med att arbeta med IKT. Det vill säga hur pass motiverade de olika yrkeskategorierna inom skolan är för att ge bra förutsättningar till fritidspedagoger för att kunna arbeta med IKT.

  • 4.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Collaborative assessment and game development: professionals’ orientation towards problems, potentials and organizational demands2014In: 4th International Conference Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper address assessment practice as part of professional activity and learning in the domain of game development. A growing body of research has been concerned with the professionalization of games production knowledge, frequently attributed to the coordinated work of numerous actors in technology dense settings. While previous accounts of games development list a multifaceted body of knowledge, there is a gap in the literature focusing on game developers’ professional knowing and learning in situ. With an analytical approach informed by ethnomethodology, this paper aim to make visible professional knowledge and learning when collaboratively evaluating games-in-development. It is focusing on game developers’ assessment work as a way to gain insight in the practical reasoning when orienting towards games and gaming as subject of assessment, and as a way of making professional knowledge bases explicit.

           The empirical material is drawn from three settings: 1) a vocational game education, 2) a national game award event, and 3) a professional game development company. Based on fieldwork augmented with video-recordings, the study investigates how games-in-development are collaborative assessed and specifically the ways professionals evaluate co-workers views and understandings with respect to what constitutes problems and potentials of games-in-development.

           Assessments are at stake in a number of internal and external work practices, such as gate reviews, playtests, and the activity of pitching not-yet-finished-nor-financed games to publishers. Games assessments are a common preoccupation at game companies and game education but also at so-called game awards. Games assessments share similarities with assessment practices in other professional and educational settings, such as design reviews in architectural practices. Both are events where proposals are assessed by externally recruited professionals. However, the assessment activities and object of assessment largely differ. In architectural education, proposals are assessed by considering the qualities visible in the designed material (such as plans, paper posters and digital slideshows) in relation to articulated intentions. This can be contrasted with the object of criticism in games presentations: the object constitutes both digitally visual material and designed ‘playable/interactive’ activities. This means that the qualities of a game cannot only be judged by interpreting the idea communicated in plain words together with some visual layout, it also has to be discovered when engaging with the designed ‘experience’. Hence, professionals’ in the gaming domain are required to account for what hinders or make possible appealing experiences during assessments of digital games.

           By focusing on professionals’ collaborative assessments, the analysis unpacks some recurrent orientations towards games and gaming in professional settings. It is shown that the professionals are faced with a number of institutional and organizational demands with respect to time, technology, conventions, and innovations.

  • 5.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Searching for the best game: professionals’ jury work at a national game-award event2014In: The Second International ProPEL: Professional Practice, Education and Learning Conference, June 25-27, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates jury-based assessment work as part of professional activity in an emerging profession, the gaming industry. Drawing on prior studies of professional learning (Mäkitalo, 2012), jury deliberations (Garfinkel, 1976), and assessment practices in related settings, assessment is approached as a way of making professional knowledge and learning visible. With an analytical focus informed by ethnomethodology, the paper builds on the idea that detailed studies of local orders of collaborative assessment in creative organizations could contribute to the understanding of assessment in professional learning.

    Although previous research on games development point to a multifaceted body of knowledge and considered its development in terms of professionalization (cf. Bennerstedt, 2013), there is a lack of empirical studies of professional game developers practices, particularly addressing the key object of criticism - the games. Games assessments are not only a common preoccupation at game companies and in game education, but also at so-called game awards where novices send in playable demos. Games evaluations share similarities with assessment practices in other professional and educational settings, such as design reviews in architectural practices (Lymer, 2010). However, the assessment activities and object of assessment largely differ, as the qualities of playable games have to be discovered interactively and therefore include a range of learning trajectories and troubles.

    Based on fieldwork augmented with video-recordings at a game café, the paper explores a small group of invited professionals’ assessment when reviewing a large number of game demos for a national game award event. By focusing on collaborative work conducted in private deliberations, it is shown that the professionals are faced with a number of challenges when ranking and grading the demos. They discover problems and qualities with the games by taking departure in fixed categories, established standards and emergent criteria, but make collaborative decisions that are governed by the jury members’ varied access to the assessed demos. The variations with respect to access are tightly related to the time schedule of the reviewing, but also the design of the interactive material. They accomplished their work by drawing on jury members’ as well as organizers’ access to, and knowledge of, demos in terms of playability, progression, emergence, visual appearance, technical solutions, etc. Critical for overcoming knowledge gaps are the ways the jury manages access by engaging in hybrid activities, i.e. moving between assessments and instructions/demonstrations of demos.

    Pedagogical implications of the analysis are discussed, and it is suggested that the jury-based assessment of digital material shed new light on how professionals deal with ad hoc learning and instruction.

     

    References

    Bennerstedt, U. (2013). Knowledge at play: Studies of games as members’ matters. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.

    Garfinkel, H. (1967). Studies in ethnomethodology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

    Lymer, G. (2010). The work of critique in architectural education. Göteborg, Sweden: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.

    Mäkitalo, Å. (2012). Professional learning and the materiality of social practice. Journal of Education and Work, 25(1), 59-78.

  • 6.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Showcasing playable demos via design conventions: game students’ presentations of multimodal phenomena in a jurybased assessment environment2014In: the 4th International Designs for Learning Conference, expanding the field., Stockholm, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Cakici, Baki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sustainability through surveillance: ICT discourses in design documents2013In: Surveillance & Society, ISSN 1477-7487, E-ISSN 1477-7487, Vol. 11, no 1/2, 177-189 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I examine design documents from three different ICT design and development projects. I argue that they present intersecting visions of sustainability entailing the wide-spread use of ICT, describe the properties of users compatible with such ICT, and provide ways of judging the users. In the design documents, the inhabitants are made individually responsible for living sustainably, and surveillance is positioned as integral to this future with the help of ICT. Underlying the visions, I identify a translation process that captures the traces of the inhabitants' lives, classifies them according to different criteria of sustainable living, and returns them to the tapestry of everyday life to convince the users to behave differently. In the discourses of these documents, surveillance translates the traces, and the translations exert new pressures on existing power relations.

  • 8.
    Cakici, Baki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Informed Gaze: On the Implications of ICT-Based Surveillance2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies are not value-neutral. I examine two domains, public health surveillance and sustainability, in five papers covering: (i) the design and development of a software package for computer-assisted outbreak detection; (ii) a workflow for using simulation models to provide policy advice and a list of challenges for its practice; (iii) an analysis of design documents from three smart home projects presenting intersecting visions of sustainability; (iv) an analysis of EU-financed projects dealing with sustainability and ICT; (v) an analysis of the consequences of design choices when creating surveillance technologies. My contributions include three empirical studies of surveillance discourses where I identify the forms of action that are privileged and the values that are embedded into them. In these discourses, the presence of ICT entails increased surveillance, privileging technological expertise, and prioritising centralised forms of knowledge.

  • 9. Duveskog, Marcus
    et al.
    Tedre, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sedano, Carolina Islas
    Sutinen, Erkki
    Life planning by digital storytelling in a primary school in rural Tanzania2012In: Educational technology & society, ISSN 1436-4522, Vol. 15, no 4, 225-237 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Storytelling is one of the earliest forms of knowledge transfer, and parents often use it for teaching their children values and knowledge. Formal schooling, however, is less inclined to use storytelling as a vehicle for knowledge transfer, and even less as a vehicle for modern self-directed, student-centered, and constructionist pedagogy. Research literature reports experiences on student-centered storytelling in schools, but there is little information about such learning environments using modern information technology. Using a case study approach, we collected qualitative data from a workshop that tested a number of constructionist pedagogical approaches and one-to-one computing technology in a hypercontextualized storytelling workshop. In that workshop, which took place in a Tanzanian primary school, pupils used their XO-1 laptops as digital media tools for expressing their dreams and solutions to overcoming challenges in life. Results of this study suggest that digital storytelling offers additional advantages when compared to traditional storytelling. Designers need to follow six principles for a successful digital storytelling workshop: commitment, contextual grounding, previous exposure to the context, involvement of local experts, atmosphere of trust, and realistic flexible planning.

  • 10.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Robotarnas kapprustning: Om spam i en nät- och bokhistorisk kontext2014In: Information som problem: Medieanalytiska texter från medeltid till framtid / [ed] Otfried Czaika, Jonas Nordin & Pelle Snickars, Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket , 2014, 242-257 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11. Fors, Eva
    et al.
    Fåhraeus, Eva R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hössjer, Annika
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education.
    Sönnerbrandt, Christopher
    LIKA – Digital Literacy in Teacher Education2007In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2007 / [ed] R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber, D. Willis, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) , 2007, 1474-1481 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of rapid changes in a digitalized society, an initiative is now taken by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation, with focus on ICT in Teacher training. Together with two other projects, the LIKA project was launched at the beginning of year 2006. The LIKA project is a six year collaboration project between four teacher education schools. After finished education teacher students shall be able to apply ICT in everyday professional teaching activities. LIKA has adapted the CDIO method, developed by engineering educational programmes. In order to assure a durable change in both organizational and curricular structures the sponsor has initiated a self assessment program and a parallel evaluation conducted by external researchers.

  • 12. Fors, Eva
    et al.
    Hössjer, Annika
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education.
    Olsson, Lena
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education.
    Sönnerbrandt, Christopher
    Diffusion of ICT in teacher education - common targets and visions by four colleges in Sweden2008In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2008 / [ed] K. McFerrin, R. Weber, R. Carlsen, D. Willis, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) , 2008, 2326-2332 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we will reflect on how diffusion of information- and communication technology, can be real in Swedish teacher education. We will describe how the Bologna process affects the work with systematic implementation of ICT and how the CDIO Initiative is used as a framework for the development of the LIKA matrix. The LIKA project was launched at the beginning of 2006 and is a six year collaboration project, between four teacher education colleges. The project is financed by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation and the participating institutions. LIKA stands for the processes of Learning, Information, Communication and Administration, which requires digital competences in order to carry out everyday professional teaching and learning activities.

  • 13. Hallberg, David
    et al.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Self-regulated learning in students’ thesis writing2017In: International Journal of Teaching and Education, ISSN 2332-5828, E-ISSN 1875-0281, Vol. 5, no 1, 13-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to find answers to how self-regulated learning (SRL) and cooperation learning orientation correlate with study success. At DSV, a department of Stockholm University, a web based support system for students’ thesis writing referred to as SciPro was implemented. The system also allowed for statistics of thesis process. Through the SciPro system we were able to retrieve students and supervisors; data were retrieved from 45 supervisors and 47 students with regard to their respective responsibilities in the thesis writing process. Vermunt’s instrument, Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS), was employed to measure students’ SRL. Overall, the relation between SRL and completed thesis was not as strong as expected.

  • 14.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring Student and Supervisor Interaction During the SciPro Thesis Process: Two Use Cases2017In: International Journal of Distance Education Technologies, ISSN 1539-3100, E-ISSN 1539-3119, Vol. 15, no 2, 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Common problems identified by students during their interaction with supervisors are too little instructions as well as infrequent and insufficient supervisor feedback. The SciPro system has been developed to tackle these problems. This paper describes, analyze and discuss the interaction between students and supervisors using the SciPro system. Through two use cases involving two supervisors and 38 bachelor and master students, the authors show that the structure implemented in SciPro supports and allows for different pedagogical approaches and supervision styles. Ten different types of interactions in the thesis process are identified. In order to explain why some students do not complete within the timeframe, the authors identify six categories of problems: 1) language skills, 2) inability to apply research methods, 3) ability for self-study, 4) lack of creativity, 5) limited knowledge about how to write academic work, and 6) lack of motivation. The collaborative stage of group-supervision may be one possible way to deal with the different type of support for the process of managing student theses.

  • 15.
    Hansson, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Qazi, Hadia
    Stockholm University, , Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap, Interaction.
    Sundqvist, Ida
    Stockholm University, , Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, , Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Online Digital Mentorship:: How Might a Digital Communication Tool Facilitate Informal Learning and Integration of Newly Arrived in Sweden2017In: 16th European Conference on e-Learning - ECEL 2017, Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The arrival of large groups of refugees is one of the great challenges in Europe today. In Sweden around 100 000 new immigrants is expected to arrive from Syria only during 2017 and there are large groups from various countries already staying in Sweden that are not properly integrated. There are no quick and smart solution to solve the inclusion of the large number of new citizens and the idea should rather be a holistic approach combining several initiatives. Lack of language skills is one of the underlying reasons for new arrivals exclusion from the labour market and social networks. Online informal language learning and digital mentorship with two way communication between New Arrivals and established Swedes might be a way to facilitate the inclusion and integration process. The aim of the study was to examine to which extent a digital communication tool could act as a resource in order to make the integration process more effective for newly arrived immigrants and refugees. Research was carried out as a qualitative cross‐sectional study with data gathered by semistructured interviews. Five educators who are actively working with newly arrived immigrants and refugees were interviewed with use of the Skype tool. A thematic analysis was conducted to find patterns and to create themes and categories that could answer the main research question: How might a digital communication tool be designed to facilitate the integration and inclusion of new arrived refugees in Sweden? The answers could be structured according to two overall themes: “Usable” and “Flexible”. The theme “Usable” consisted of three sub‐themes Ease of Access, Improved language skills and Integrity Facilitation, while the theme “Flexible” was divided into two subcategories Adaptable and Educational content. The findings confirm that a digital communication tool would support integration of new arrivals by facilitating personal dialogues with established Swedes. The recommendation is to create an online platform that supports language learning and enables multi‐way digital mentorship in a social network with benefits for the established Swedes as well.

  • 16.
    Kivunike, Florence Nameere
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Makerere University, Uganda.
    A Structured Approach for Evaluating ICT Contributions to Development2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is considerable on-going research aimed at devising means of evaluating the contribution information and communication technology (ICT) makes towards development, of which this thesis forms a part. It specifically seeks to investigate how a structured approach can support the evaluation of the ICT contribution to development. The need to demonstrate that ICT actually contributes to development is a concern for all those involved in policy and implementation of ICT for development (ICT4D). This research therefore adopted a broad perspective in developing the evaluation approach, particularly applying it to initiatives in Uganda as a test bed. The research further embraced an interdisciplinary approach to accommodate the complex ICT interactions. It merged concepts from information systems, development studies and applied decision theories to devise an evaluation approach. The design science research paradigm facilitated the understanding of what constitutes ICT-related development as basis for developing and testing the approach. Both case study and survey research strategies were applied to facilitate data collection at the different stages of the research.

    This thesis proposes a model and criteria for the evaluation of ICT-related development. Qualitative indicators are proposed, validated and tested for various dimensions including research and education, healthcare, economic opportunities, political freedoms and psychological wellbeing.

    Findings confirm the multidimensional and complex nature of the interactions of ICT in development. For instance, ICT benefits may not be restricted to specific goals, severally characterised by unintended benefits. This corroborates the essence of multidimensional evaluations to ensure a more meaningful understanding and establishing of ICT4D benefits. The majority of the proposed indicators could appropriately evaluate the ICT contribution to development. Notably, the quest by decision-makers for quantitative measures in evaluating development benefits is still apparent. Therefore, it is imperative that qualitative and quantitative approaches complement each other in the evaluation of the ICT contribution to development, a subject that can be addressed in subsequent studies. Furthermore, ICT4D benefits can be categorised in terms of significance to an initiative, for example primary and/or secondary contributors to development. For instance, while cost reductions and savings represent an important benefit, this research established that they were secondary to several others, such as providing a timely service in as far as improved access to healthcare is concerned. This is another aspect that would benefit from further investigation.

  • 17.
    Kivunike, Florence Nameere
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mats, Danielson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tusubira, F. F.
    Investigating Universal Access from a Human Development Perspective2009In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on ICT, Society and Human Beings / [ed] Gunilla Bradley, Piet Kommers, International Association for Development of the Information Society , 2009, 58-66 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lennstrand, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Persson, Christian
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Forsström, Lars
    Net Society. Content Creation in Broadband Systems2000In: : E-business Key Issues Applications Technologies / [ed] Stanford-Smith, B., Kidd, T., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2000, 1051-1057 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of a broadband application which integrates TV, Internet, picture telephones etc has been going on for several years within Telia, Sweden's leading telecom operator. The prototype solutions have been developed from a vision of how the distant communication of the future could function. Results of a qualitative study of how the prototype is perceived by consumers and service providers are presented. Compared to the Internet, the NNS prototype was perceived as being simpler, less confusing, faster to navigate and suited for all kinds of people. This paper has two aims: to provide an inspiration for new applications in a broadband environment, and to indicate problems connected with presenting content in a broadband environment.

  • 19.
    Lennstrand, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Persson, Christian
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
    Wallin, Erik
    KTH.
    Bifurcation - Improving the Effectiveness of Personalized Web-based Systems2004In: eAdoption and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham, Amsterdam, 2004, 491-498 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with a personalization system that utilizes descriptions of information characteristics to perform content based filtering in order to increase stated business objectives. The paper reports from testing of the personalization system in two commercial implementations, the website of Sweden’s third largest daily newspaper and the website of one of Sweden’s largest online recruitment services for the public sector. The results indicate that personalization has a positive influence on the stated business objective – traffic increase. Further, a personalization configuration that gives a high weight to the customer’s behavior in the ongoing session compared to the behavior in previous sessions was favorable to promote traffic increase.

  • 20.
    Lennstrand, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Persson, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Advertising and Public Relations.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    E-commerce in a multi-channel retailing context2002In:  , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reports on qualitative case studies of a purposeful sample of e-commerce companies. This is part of ongoing research, aiming at pointing out the qualities that characterize profitable e-commerce activities. The findings are compared with the success criteria derived from previous research on consumers’ evaluation of the e-channel. The paper concludes by discussing the prerequisites for a successful e-business. From our previous research, we have hypothesized that the e-channel should be seen as a complementary channel to the traditional channels. Therefore, we particularly focus on multi-channel retailers.

  • 21.
    Majek, Dee
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Big Content's Big Blunders: Anti-piracy measures in the entertainment and copyright industries2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the on-going anti-piracy and anti-file sharing measures taken by media conglomerates and big content as misguided attempts at addressing changing consumer expectations and social and technological norms. These measures include legislation such as the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act (PIPA), Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), and Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA); and litigation against both extremes of the spectrum: from the world's largest file sharing search engines like The Pirate Bay, and cyberlockers like MegaUpload, to private citizens who illegally downloaded a few movies or a few songs. The manner in which the entertainment industry's largest, most expensive, and highest-profile anti-piracy measures in the recent years have been received by groups from IT corporations to human rights organizations, researchers, politicians, legal and internet experts, and millions of citizens worldwide are of focus; and how this translates into an unpopular public image is explored. Piracy is underlined as a service and distribution problem, and various international studies are presented in exploring the relationship between illegal downloading and legal purchases.

  • 22. Mensonen, Aino
    et al.
    Persson, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Stafseng, Terje
    Vatrapu, Ravi
    Kaldalons, Örn
    Novel AR solutions in media: customer perception of augmented reality in media applications – possibilities for new service innovations2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A project titled ‘Customer Perception of Augmented Reality (AR) in Media Applica-tions – Possibilities for New Service Innovations’was carried out, with participantsfrom all of the Nordic countries. The project addressed the fact that the magazineand newspaper business is set to change dramatically as printed products en-counter two specific challenges: a) increasing competition from other media and b)changes in media-consumption habits caused by growth in the use of smartphonesand tablets, such as instant access and digital delivery. The changing marketenvironment for print-media products also opens new opportunities for using tech-nologies such as AR to create innovative applications and hence add businessvalue. To investigate the opportunities for service development within this area, weconducted a study of the state of the art to review the theoretical concepts relevantfor better understanding of the macro-level societal trends and business potentialof augmented reality for print products. Selected cases of augmented reality forprint products were then presented.The next phase of the project consisted of a Nordic empirical study of user per-ceptions of AR applications. Focus-group interviews were used to collect partici-pants’ statements about the use of AR technology. These statements were thenranked by means of the Q-sort method. Factor-analysis methods were appliedwith the objective of understanding the similarities among participants’ answers.The results indicated that AR was seen as useful, beneficial, attractive, interesting,and fascinating and as possessing the ‘wow’ factor. Some considered AR’s usagetime-consuming, while others deemed it time-saving. Another finding is that stand-ards seem to be lacking both for the user interface and on the business-handlingside. Participants saw AR as offering great possibility for innovation. People wouldlike to try the applications, and they would indeed find time for using them. Expec-tations set for AR applications are high.Stemming from the interview and Q-sort, an innovation workshop was organized forthe 19 industrial and academic partners of the project. The brain storming sessionaimed at producing new innovative service concept ideas of AR in printed media.Thirty four different ideas were generated in the workshop. The industrial partnerswere encouraged to select one idea for further development and produce a pilot.The pilots as well as the development process and experiences where presentedas a part of the end seminar.

  • 23.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Orchestrating scaffolded outdoor mobile learning activities2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the beginning of time, technological innovations have formed the basis for the development of society and supported the most fundamental societal features. The educational system is no exception. This we have witnessed on many occasions, as for example in form of the transformations of learning and teaching introduced by the printing press, the calculator and computers. With the advance of mobile technology, we have received another technology that inspires research fields to study the learning and teaching potentials that mobile technology may present. It is from here this thesis takes its general starting point, namely, in the determination to critically examine the role mobile technology can play in supporting outdoor learning activities. More specifically, the thesis attempts to, on the one hand, develop an understanding of the challenges and limitations associated with scaffolding students’ mobile learning in outdoor environments. On the other hand, based on such a developed understanding, the thesis investigates how mobile technology-supported outdoor activities should be orchestrated to scaffold students learning. Orchestration is, in this thesis, understood as the process of productively coordinating supportive interventions across multiple learning activities occurring at multiple social levels involving multiple contexts, and multiple tools and media.The framework of design-based research has guided the methodological approach. Three design studies formed the empirical basis of the study of the issues. The results of the thesis indicate the difficulties and challenges in supporting students in outdoor contexts and delineate an understanding of how mobile outdoor learning activities can be orchestrated with students scaffolding needs taken into account.The thesis contributes with a conceptualization of and a model for orchestration of mobile learning activities, a framework for design-based research in mobile learning, as well as a critical perspective on the introduction of mobile technology in education. 

  • 24.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Characterizing learning mediated by mobile technologies: a cultural-historical activity theoretical analysis2015In: IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, ISSN 1939-1382, E-ISSN 1939-1382, Vol. 8, no 4, 357-366 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies have not yet triggered the knowledge revolution in schools anticipated, in particular, by the telecommunications industry. On the contrary, mobile technologies remain extensively used outside the frontiers of formal education. The reasons for this are many and varied. In this paper, we concentrate on those associated with the prevalent methodological weakness in the study of innovative educational interventions with mobile technologies. In this context, the paper investigates the following question: what is the potential of second-generation cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) for characterizing learning activities mediated by mobile technologies? To this end, an empirical study was designed with the goal of examining five small groups of students (fifth grade, age 12) who were using mobile devices in authentic educational settings, within a natural science inquiry-based learning activity outdoors. Second-generation CHAT was operationalized as an analytical and dialectic methodological framework for understanding learning activities mediated by mobile devices. The study contributes a characterization of mobile learning and identification of constraints and transformations introduced by mobile technology into students’ tasks.

  • 25.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Learning Activity Design Framework for Supporting Mobile Learning2016In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 8, no 1, 1-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces the Learning Activity Design (LEAD) framework for the development and implementation of mobile learning activities in primary schools. The LEAD framework draws on methodological perspectives suggested by design-based research and interaction design in the specific field of technology-enhanced learning (TEL). The LEAD framework is grounded in four design projects conducted over a period of six years. It contributes a new understanding of the intricacies and multifaceted aspects of the design-process characterizing the development and implementation of mobile devices (i.e. smart phones and tablets) in curricular activities conducted in Swedish primary schools. This framework is intended to provide both designers and researchers with methodological tools that take account of the pedagogical foundations of technologically-based educational interventions, usability issues related to the interaction with the mobile application developed, multiple data streams generated during the design project, multiple stakeholders involved in the design process and sustainability aspects of the mobile learning activities implemented in the school classroom.

  • 26.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Higher Education Lecturers’ Lived Experience of Going Public in MOOCs2017In: Open Praxis, ISSN 1369-9997, E-ISSN 2304-070X, Vol. 9, no 3, 287-297 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academics in higher education are used to having their research publications reviewed and openly scrutinized. Teaching in higher education has traditionally been an individual academic’s activity that has taken place in a closed classroom. However, the introduction of open education, particularly massive open online courses (MOOCs) has challenged this. In MOOCs, lectures are recorded and made public for thousands of course participants to view. This study investigates, via semi-structured interviews, how 20 lecturers of 10 MOOCs at six Swedish Universities have experienced this. All have joined the projects voluntarily, but a few have done so with some ambivalence. For them, standing in front of the camera, publishing material and, to some extent, losing control of the course content was scary at the beginning of the projects. Overall, the lecturers overcame this and thought that it was a good opportunity to reach many students, as well as a way to keep up with the changing requirements for teaching in higher education.

  • 27.
    Persson, Christian
    KTH.
    Blås liv i den digitala radion2005In: Sydsvenskan, ISSN 1652-814X, no 21 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Persson, Christian
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH),.
    Concurrent Enterprising by means of a Broadband Portal2002In: 8th International Conference on Concurrent Enterprising: Ubiquitous Engineering in the Collaborative Economy, Nottingham: University of Nottingham , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis in this paper is based on a hypermedia interface strategy. A broadband portal issued from the concept of the local metaphor (Fidler 1997) has been developed as a prototype. The prototype has been used as a demonstrator and is evaluated in focus group interviews with users and service providers. The prototype represents an example of a true Concurrent Enterprising system since the broadband portal gives independent customers and service providers the opportunity to cooperate and interact by help of a common technological platform.

  • 29.
    Persson, Christian
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
    Customisation of Information in The Manufacturing Industry2004In: eAdoption and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2004, 1148-1155 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      The production and distribution of information in connection with products and services is one of the most important functions in today’s business world. The ability to produce and deliver information to the right place on time is often crucial for the company’s reputation and sales. This paper address questions about how companies can establish a dynamic information system with the help of digital media technology and customisation of information. Customisation of information is a process where information is adapted and distributed on different media platforms. A case study of a manufacturing company with global information activity is presented. The case describes a renewal of the company's information strategy in relation to its customer’s preferences. The case demonstrates how multi-channel publishing, including electronic on-line medias, combined with digital printing can offer efficient tools to reach out to the customers with customized information.

  • 30.
    Persson, Christian
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    e-Handel kräver lätthanterliga system2001Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Persson, Christian
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
     Factors influencing the future of e-Commerce2007In:  , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After one decade of intense e-commerce activities, the Internet as a channel for commercial activities looks bright. Still there are important factors related to commercial activities on the Internet that have to be focused on since they will have a great influence on the future development or have not yet reached a satisfying level. In this reflective paper some of the most important of these factors are discussed in the light of recent research.

  • 32.
    Persson, Christian
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Individuellt bemötande på personaliserad webbplats2000Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Persson, Christian
    Framkom Verksamhetsutveckling AB.
    Personalized Printing used as a One-to-One Enabler2003In: Building the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies / [ed] Cunningham, P., Cunningham, M., Fatelnig, P., 2003, 329-336 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The penetration of digital printers in the graphic arts industry today is rather high. However, only a small percentage of the equipment’s capacity is used for personalized printing. It is instead used for the ordinary production of smaller editions. This means that the primary intention of the technology as a tool to produce personalized material has not been realized. One reason for this is the basic lack of understanding towards the business models that can guide personalized printing and how these models can generate value to the actors on the market. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the basic knowledge of personalized printing as an enabler for a one-to-one information strategy. The question of how personalized printed matter combined with electronically distributed information can be a tool in an information and communication strategy for an industrial manufacturer is also discussed.

  • 34.
    Persson, Christian
    Tekniksa högskolan, Stockholm.
    Strategies for enhancing consumer interaction in electronic retailing2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, the potential for electronic commerce via the Internet has been intensively discussed. A strong vision of e-commerce as a business with great potential has been established. In the mean time different signs of problems in connection with e-commerce have been observed. The comprehensive empirical material concerning consumers’ impressions and experiences of e-commerce indicates that important qualities in the business are missing. This dissertation seeks to examine the potential for e-commerce by identifying and analysing factors that are important for the consumers in making use of the new medium. Based on the results obtained, new systems and strategies that could facilitate the interaction between e-trading companies and consumers are discussed. The study starts with the identification of five factors that affect the consumer’s possibilities of making use of the products and services in an e-commerce environment. The factors are: Attention, experiences, Social interaction, Physical contact with the products, and Consumer trust. Three strategies with the aim to improve the interaction between consumers and e-trading companies are proposed, based on the analysis. The strategies are developed and examined in six research papers forming the basis of this dissertation. Three papers discuss the use of personalization systems and autonomous agents in e-commerce. These contribute to the formation of a strategy called Analytical technology. One paper deals with the study of an advanced multimedia user interface distributed by means of a broadband portal. The strategy behind this is called the Hypermedia interface. Two papers discuss the combination of different retailing channels arranged in close connection. The proposed strategy is named Multi-Channel Retailing. The results of the studies indicate that all three strategies can give important contributions to the establishment of ease-of-use in e-commerce. The Multi-Channel Retailing strategy seems to be the most useful strategy in the short run. This is due to the fact that the necessary infrastructure already exists. The Analytical technology strategy and the Hypermediacy interface strategy have the potential to become important strategies in the future of e-commerce. However, a more common implementation cannot be expected until these systems have been further developed. Key words: e-commerce, consumers, interaction, autonomous agents, personalization, hypermedia interface, broadband, multi-channel retailing.

  • 35.
    Persson, Christian
    et al.
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Dubois, Ulf
    From printed matters to information distribution New strategies in the Graphic Arts industry2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the start of digitalization and the introduction of electronic medias suitable for publishing, i.e., the Internet, the printing industry has been struggling to find business models that can survive under these new conditions. Their main strategy up until now has been to find the niches where traditional printing matter is still unthreatened. Another strategy has been to approach the interactive electronic medias and personalize the printed matter with the help of digital printing presses, e.g., print-on-demand and personalized printing. However, long-term survival will demand a broader perspective. Far-sighted printing companies are therefore developing strategies that radically redefine their business. This paper discusses the reasoning behind the new strategies and presents a case study of a printing company that is transforming its activities from traditional printing into multi-channel production and information distribution.

  • 36.
    Persson, Christian
    et al.
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Lennstrand, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Wallin, Erik
    KTH.
    The SportWeb Case: Design and Prototyping of a System for E-commerce and Research.1999In: / [ed] Ruby Roy Dholakia and Nikhilesh Dholakia, Providence, Rhode Island: COTIM 99 , 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the design of an e-commerce system with the capability to generate consumer data. A system prototype has been created which supports real-time identification, selection, and exposure of personalized content. Combined with tracking of the visitor’s movements on the Web-site, the system makes it possible to establish detailed behavioral patterns. The paper aims at making design process and considerations transparent to the reader.

  • 37.
    Persson, Christian
    et al.
    STFI Packforsk AB.
    Lindqvist, Ulf
    VTT.
    Niels, Bjørn-Andersen
    CBS Copenhagen Business Scool.
    Kaldalóns, Örn S.
    ICEPRO.
    Krokan, Arne
    NTNU.
    New Business Forms in e-Business and Media “e-Media”2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a preliminary study a Nordic network for e-Business has been established between the media industry, vendors, service providers and scientists. This network has performed this project with the scope to develop new new innovative service forms and products for this new business area called ”e-Media”, and to identify the value chains and new business models needed for this area.

    The study first analyses the strucrural changes in the media and allied industries, i.e. content creation and advertising. Thereafter, a framework for innovations in e-Media is built together with a variety of business models. The framework is then used to identify new innovative service embryos for e-Media. Finally eight new services are exploited in industrial case studies.

    The outcome of the project is an extensive description of innovation methods, business models, more than sixty innovation embryos for exploitation and eight examples of more or less successfully exploited e-Media pilot cases. The project also elucidates the huge business potential of e-Media.

  • 38.
    Persson, Christian
    et al.
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
    Wallin, Erik
    KTH.
    Lennstrand, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Personalization Matured - Rediscovering the Essence of One-to-One Marketing2006In: IADIS International Conference / [ed] Isaias, P., Portugal: IADIS Press, 2006, 89-96 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The paper is about personalization system applications in different kind of settings. The studied systems utilize descriptions of information characteristics to perform content based filtering in order to increase stated business objectives. Data and experiences from action research, covering three different product areas – sports retailing, online newspaper and online recruitment sites, are presented and discussed, as well as the considerations made when developing and adapting a personalization system for each of these areas. Data describing personalization efficiency have been collected through an own-developed method, bifurcation, which makes it possible to compare the behavior of personalized groups with the behavior of an un-personalized control groups. The results show that personalization has a positive influence on the stated business objective – traffic increase.

  • 39.
    Persson, Christian
    et al.
    Høgskolen i Gjøvik, Norway.
    Wallin, Erik
    KTH.
    Lennstrand, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Personalization Matured – Rediscovering The Essence of One-To-One marketing2007In: IADIS International Journal on WWW/Internet, ISSN 1645-7641, Vol. 5, no 1, 145-158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Persson, Christian
    et al.
    Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH),.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Critical factors for e-business retailing2000In: E-business: Key Issues, Applications and Technologies / [ed] Stanford-Smith, B., Kidd, P.T., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2000, 824-830 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of players marketing consumer goods and services on the Internet is steadily increasing.  The original (physical) retailers experience fierce competition from other suppliers who market directly to the consumers. How should physical retailers meet this competition? In this paper we show there are many areas which can complement each other between the physical retail store and the e-store. We concentrate our analyses on three basic retailing activities: building the assortment, providing information about the products offered and finally, providing access to the products as part of the final transaction. We ascertain that it makes sense for traditional retailers to establish electronic retailing as part of their current business to meet the competition. The results are based on an strengths and weaknesses analysis of how the basic retail functions change when performed electronically. This evaluation is made from a consumer perspective, based on extensive empirical data. The paper ends with suggestions on how retailers can improve their e-retailing service to the consumers.

  • 41.
    Sauter, Willmar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies, Musicology and Performance Studies.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Digital teater i publikens tjänst?2012In: Teatertidningen, ISSN 1101-9107, no 4, 16-19 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett exempel på hur digital teater kan skapas och hur den når annorlunda publikgrupper.

  • 42.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Engineering meets marketing: advertising soft- and hardware in the 1980s2015In: In the Flow: People, Media, Materialities / [ed] Johanna Dahlin, Tove Andersson, Linköpings universitet , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of computer systems has been followed by market-ing and sales of the same systems. Computer systems and the language used to describe them form a material-discursive relationship, where information comes with both physical and philological propensities. This study will analyse the combined discourses and functionalities that permeated advertisements, commercials and infomercials in the marketing of computer systems during the 1980s. This will provide insights into how the impending computerisation of society took place at an ideological and linguistic level, which in turn was grounded in the material capacities of media technologies.

  • 43.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Framtidens medier: fiktion och politik2015In: ikaros - tidskrift om människan och vetenskapen, ISSN 1796-1998, Vol. 11, no 3-4, 13-15 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vår värld blir allt mer medierad. Medieteknologier utgör allt oftare ett mellanled i allt fler mänskliga aktiviteter. Denna hypermediering är på många sätt ett uttryck för en längtan efter omedelbarhet — en ideal kommunikationssituation där vi, hypotetiskt, kan överföra tankar och sinnesförnimmelser direkt, utan mellanled, till varandra.

     

    Denna längtan efter kommunikationens allt snabbare omedelbarhet gör att alla medier egentligen bara blir en biprodukt av vår oförmåga till direkt och omedelbar tankeöverföring. Om vi kunde överföra tankar och känslor direkt, utan mellanled, så skulle många medier kanske till och med bli överflödiga. Men idag driver en längtan efter omedelbarhet medieutvecklingen och den skapar på sin väg också en längtan efter bättre medier — efter medier som hela tiden kan komma närmare omedelbarheten. Vi längtar efter medier som är bättre än tidigare på att ”mer omedelbart” förmedla tankar och sinnesförnimmelser mellan oss människor. Vi längtar efter framtidens medier.

  • 44.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Functionality2014In: Encyclopedia of Social Media and Politics / [ed] Kerric Harvey, London: Sage Publications, 2014, 559-560 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general terms, functionality refers to what hardware and software ‘can do’ for a prototypical user. Functionality, in the context of social media, can be said to refer to a set of functions or capabilities associated with a particular social networking service. Thus, when elaborating on functionality it becomes important to recognize that it has a sub-structure consisting of self-contained units of computational code, or functions. In computer science, a function is an independent part of a program’s entire code that instructs the computer to perform a specific assignment.

  • 45.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Im/possible desires: media temporalities and (post)human technology relationships2016In: Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 4, no 2, 47-76 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general question of how our human desires can be supported by media technologies has produced a fairly constant endeavour in human history — and still does, for example in the shape of transhumanist hopes and aspirations. Over time, these desires have often driven development towards an, in the end, materialized technology. Many times, however, the desires have also not resulted in a physical product, but rather remained as ideas, conceptual sketches, or lo-fi prototypes. This essay will examine how such imaginary media technologies can be defined and categorized, why they are important to study, and how the underlying desires seem to be revitalized across centuries and decades. Such questions are of interest to transhumanism as they illustrate how desires, temporal relations, and human-technology relationships have been (and are) imagined both in the past, the present, and towards the future. So, while this essay is not a media archaeological excavation of transhumanist imaginary media only (which would be an interesting project in itself), it is a media genealogy of historically recurring desires to extend, substitute and enhance the human body and mind.

  • 46.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Interpreting online discussions: Connecting artefacts and experiences in user studies2015In: Qualitative Report, ISSN 1052-0147, Vol. 20, no 1, 115-129 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a methodological effort to connect the specifics of technologies to the details of social practices, in an attempt to deepen our understanding of evolving sociotechnical cultures. More specifically, this paper describes a methodological framework that makes use of online discussions as a vital source of data. The reason the paper focuses on online discussion is that the Internet has become a natural habitat for discussions of high-end technologies, be they physical products or online services. The framework combines interpretative research and attribute-consequence-value (ACV) chain theory – a theory commonly applied to market and consumer research – to conceptualize and explore evolving prosumer cultures through online discussions. The benefit of using ACV chain theory is that it explicitly connects products and services to practices and values. The proposed methodological framework identifies three central techniques to elicit and analyse ACV chains from online prosumer discussions: (1) attribute analysis (2) Internet forum data collection and (3) thematic analysis. The paper goes on to exemplify the application of this framework by examining the sociotechnical co-evolution of the friend list – a backbone feature of many social networking services. In summary, this paper shows how ACV chains can be fruitfully applied to explore evolving prosumer cultures and make the vital connection between technical features and emerging cultures.

  • 47.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Mischievous machines: a design criticism of programmable partners2017In: DHN 2017, Digital humaniora i Norden/Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries, Göteborg, March 14–16, 2017: Conference abstracts / [ed] Daniel Brodén, 2017, 104-105 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results from a design critical reading (Bardzell & Bardzell, 2015; Bardzell, Bolter, & Löwgren, 2010) of the AI-powered social robot Cozmo. Cozmo was released to the market during the fall of 2016 and is described as a “supercomputer on treads”. It comes in the form of a small forklift-like vehicle, which most prominent features are the caterpillar bands that drive it, the lift in front of it, and a screen, ef-fectively displaying stylized graphical facial expressions.The design critique will focus on the notion of programmability (Chun, 2008; Pa-rikka, 2014) and how this condition may affect human-technology relations (Ihde, 1990; Nørskov, 2015; Verbeek, 2011).

  • 48.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Value2014In: Encyclopedia of Social Media and Politics / [ed] Kerric Harvey, London: Sage Publications, 2014, 1318-1319 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Value is a generic term that may refer to a personal or cultural level and domains such as ethics, sociology and economics. In the context of social media and digital communication however it becomes interesting to think of values in terms of exchange and sharing. In other words, what values do people attach to the digital objects that they share via social mediating technologies? This question becomes increasingly pertinent with the potential convergence of producers and consumers that becomes possible with the disperse of media technologies.

  • 49.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    'Well-behaved robots rarely make history’: coactive technologies and humanistic HCIIn: Design and Culture, ISSN 1754-7075, E-ISSN 1754-7083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies, equipped with artificial intelligence and an agency of their own, are becoming increasingly available to consumers. Rather than just augmenting human senses or mediating information, these coactive technologies are mobile, pro-active, context-sensitive, programmable and agential in the milieu of the user. This paper illustrates a humanistic HCI approach to coactive technologies by analysing the AI-powered robot Cozmo. The analysis demonstrates how Cozmo 1) remediates fictional characteristics to appear more familiar, emotional and lovable; 2) is both pre-programmed and programmable, creating an interesting tension in its agential spectrum; and 3) is discursively marketed as a cunning, emotional, and non-machinic accomplice.

  • 50.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Making Change: Produsing Hybrid Learning Products2014In: Hybrid Pedagogy - a digital journal of learning, teaching and technology, ISSN 2332-2098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Too often, we demand from our students written proof of learning in the form of academic text. This is perhaps especially true within the humanities and the social sciences. We have, however, previously argued for the importance of installing an agency for change in students. For us, this agency seems unlikely to come only from producing a text that will at worst only be read by an examiner and at best also by a few classmates. This feeling of agency and efficacy (the capacity to produce an effect) rather comes with produsing hybrid learning products belonging to new/other genres than the ’pure’ critically reflecting text (or hardcore exams). We do not oppose critical reflection as being a foundation stone of any education, but as Laurillard, we argue that further inspiration could be taken from engineering, architecture, computer science and medicine in encouraging more of a ”design thinking” in (digital) humanities students. On a more general scale this is an approach that would combine critical reflection and experiential learning, and imbue students with an agency to make change and, quite literally, push things forward.

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