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  • 1.
    Abdul Baten, Mohammed
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Property rights in mangroves: A case study of the Mahakam Delta, East Kalimantan, Indonesia2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mangroves represent an important source of livelihood for many poor people acrossthe world. However, insufficient policy responses relating to mangrove conservation,combined with the lack of clearly defined property rights contribute extensively to theconversion of mangroves to alternative uses, in particular shrimp aquaculture. On thebasis of relevant theoretical perspectives on property rights, this Master’s thesisanalyses various formal and informal institutions and existing governancemechanisms that determine natural resources management in the Mahakam delta, EastKalimantan, Indonesia. By employing a qualitative participatory research approachthe case study explores how different institutions in Indonesia shape the local propertyrights regime in mangroves. The results show that the interplay between formal andinformal institutions involved in defining property rights, along with the lack ofcoordination among responsible government agencies, has resulted in the clearing ofone of the largest Nypah forests in the world for shrimp pond construction withinthree decades. Moreover, the study suggests that the current problem of mangrovedestruction will not be solved merely by declaring the Mahakam delta as a protectedarea or by assigning full ownership rights to the local people. On the contrary, thestudy suggests that the coordination and enforcement mechanisms should be enhancedin such ways that they simultaneously address both local peoples’ needs as well asecosystem integrity.

  • 2.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. University of Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Lampos, Vasileios
    Garnett, Philip
    Bentley, R. Alexander
    The Expression of Emotions in 20th Century Books2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 3, e59030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report here trends in the usage of mood words, that is, words carrying emotional content, in 20th century English language books, using the data set provided by Google that includes word frequencies in roughly 4% of all books published up to the year 2008. We find evidence for distinct historical periods of positive and negative moods, underlain by a general decrease in the use of emotion-related words through time. Finally, we show that, in books, American English has become decidedly more emotional than British English in the last half-century, as a part of a more general increase of the stylistic divergence between the two variants of English language.

  • 3.
    Ahammad, Ronju
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Understanding institutional changes for reducing vulnerability to landslides in Chittagong City, Bangladesh2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ineffective hill management policy at the national level and weak enforcement by thelocal authorities has created space for developing many informal settlements alonglandslide prone hillslopes in Chittagong city, Bangladesh. These settlements areconsidered illegal by the formal authorities, the settlers perceive their presence inthose areas as legal occupants, which have caused land tenure conflicts with formalauthorities over the last decades. The continual land tenure conflict has weakenedinstitutional arrangement for reducing vulnerability to landslides in the informalsettlements. The thesis paper is prepared based on the findings of a case study on thelandslides which occurred in 2007 in Chittagong city. The fieldwork of the study wascarried out using qualitative tools such as individual interviewing of organisationalrespondents and a focus group interview in Matijarna informal settlement to examinewhat institutional changes have occurred for reducing social vulnerability of informalsettlers to landslides in Chittagong city. The study finds that the institutional changeshave occurred as short-term mitigation policies like establishing structural measuresalong hillslopes for adjustment and relocation of the most vulnerable informal settlers.Anchoring on institutional change theory, the study suggests that new policies mayreduce social vulnerability of informal settlers to landslides through addressing thefollowing issues. First, previous institutional arrangements and how those shapedpresent vulnerability of informal settlers to landslides must be understood. Second,land tenure security of the informal settlers must be well incorporated in currentmitigation policies. Third, organisational coordination should be strengthened fromnational to local level, as well as, between government agencies and otherorganisations like NGOs and civil society to facilitate policy implementation process.

  • 4. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, IngelaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.Kilhammar, Karin
    HR: Att ta tillvara mänskliga resurser2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ahlgren, Per
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication in Engineering Sciences (ECE), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pagin, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Persson, Olle
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen..
    Svedberg, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Bibliometric analysis of two subdomains in philosophy: free will and sorites2015In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 103, no 1, 47-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we tested the fruitfulness of advanced bibliometric methods for mapping subdomains in philosophy. The development of the number of publications on free will and sorites, the two subdomains treated in the study, over time was studied. We applied the cocitation approach to map the most cited publications, authors and journals, and we mapped frequently occurring terms, using a term co-occurrence approach. Both subdomains show a strong increase of publications in Web of Science. When we decomposed the publications by faculty, we could see an increase of free will publications also in social sciences, medicine and natural sciences. The multidisciplinary character of free will research was reflected in the cocitation analysis and in the term co-occurrence analysis: we found clusters/groups of cocited publications, authors and journals, and of co-occurring terms, representing philosophy as well as non-philosophical fields, such as neuroscience and physics. The corresponding analyses of sorites publications displayed a structure consisting of research themes rather than fields. All in all, both philosophers involved in this study acknowledge the validity of the various networks presented. Bibliometric mapping appears to provide an interesting tool for describing the cognitive orientation of a research field, not only in the natural and life sciences but also in philosophy, which this study shows.

  • 6. Ahmed, N
    et al.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Allison, E.H.
    Muir, J.F.
    Prawn postlarvae fishing in coastal Bangladesh: Challenges for sustainable livelihoods2010In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 34, no 2, 218-227 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fishing for prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) postlarvae is a major contributor to the livelihoods of the coastal poor in Bangladesh, including women. A study of coastal livelihoods along the lower Pasur River in southwest Bangladesh indicates that on average 40% of total annual income comes from postlarvae fishing during the few months involved. However, indiscriminate fishing of wild postlarvae, with high levels of by-catch, has an impact on biodiversity in coastal ecosystems. This has provoked imposition of restrictions on postlarvae collection. The ban has, however, not been firmly enforced because of the lack of alternative livelihoods for coastal poor. A conceptual framework, drawn from an approach to poverty reduction known as the sustainable livelihoods approach, is applied to understanding the role of prawn postlarvae fishing. Evidence from this study suggests that postlarvae fishers faced a number of livelihood constraints, including poor livelihood assets. This paper concludes that wider livelihood options need to be found for postlarvae fishers to support their livelihoods.

  • 7.
    al Rawaf, Rawaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-Ecological Urbanism: Lessons in Design from the Albano Resilient Campus2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Currently there is a demand for practical ways to integrate ecological insights into practices of design, which previously have lacked a substantive empirical basis. In the process of developing the Albano Resilient Campus, a transdisciplinary group of ecologists, design scholars, and architects pioneered a conceptual innovation, and a new paradigm of urban sustainability and development: Social-Ecological Urbanism.  Social-Ecological Urbanism is based on the frameworks of Ecosystem Services and Resilience thinking. This approach has created novel ideas with interesting repercussions for the international debate on sustainable urban development. From a discourse point of view, the concept of SEU can be seen as a next evolutionary step for sustainable urbanism paradigms, since it develops synergies between ecological and socio-technical systems. This case study collects ‘best practices’ that can lay a foundational platform for learning, innovation, partnership and trust building within the field of urban sustainability. It also bridges gaps in existing design approaches, such as Projective Ecologies and Design Thinking, with respect to a design methodology with its basis firmly rooted in Ecology.

  • 8.
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Decline, Crisis and Turnaround in the Swedish School Market:: the case of a school that has come through2013In: Creativity and Innovation in Educational Research, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he principles of New Public Management (Adcroft & Willis, 2005, Deifenbach, 2008) have inspired educational reforms in Sweden during the last 20 years with the introduction of a large array of reforms: educational standards, national assessments, new grading system, accountability, vouchers, independent schools, school inspectorate (Allodi, in press, NAE, 2013). One of the assumptions is that the schools will perform better if they are exposed to concurrence from other schools, through the parents’ free choice of school. The system requires therefore that inspectorate reports and various measures of school performance are made publicly available. Measures of students’ achievements, grades, qualification rates, are included in the accountability system, while measures of school performance on other shared educational goals, as inclusiveness, fairness and equity, are usually not considered.  It is inevitable that some schools will be identified as low performers, or as performing less well than expected - in models that take account of school composition. The models employed in the Swedish school accountability system, however, do not take account of students with special educational needs and/or disabilities. Schools that recruit large numbers of disadvantaged students or that recruit students with special educational needs from the whole districts to special units, risk getting lower results than expected, may get consequently a bad reputation and eventually smaller numbers of students, which may conduce to economic trouble and budget cuts. Schools like these may be penalized and risk ending up in a situation of demoralization and crisis (Allodi, in press).The school’s organizational climate has been identified as a factor that influences school performance and students’ well being and results (Rutter & Maughan, 2002; Leithwood, 2011). The aim of the intervention program Social climate participation and learning was to sustain changes in the schools’ organizational climate, by mean of activities for the staff as workshops, evaluations and planning, in collaboration with a researcher. The broad theoretical framework of the intervention includes theories of learning environments, universal human needs and values (Allodi, 2007, 2010 a, 2010b, Schwartz, 1995), organizational  learning and change (Mintzberg, 1983, Senge, 1995, Kaplan , 2007). The changes were expected to make the school more equitable and inclusive, increasing the number of students that were qualified to secondary education, and also to raise the average qualification value of the students and their well-being. Pinehill school was one of the two schools that participated in the program. Pinehill school is a junior public high school with about 300 students located in a suburban municipality, in a neighborhood of about 16 thousand inhabitants. The employment rate in the area is about 84 % and 17 % of the population have an immigrant background. Pinehill school has a district commissioned special unit for students with special educational needs. The situation of the school at the beginning and some of the development and changes that occurred and were manifested at Pinehill school during three years are described and analyzed in this paper.

    The study is a case study of a school participating in a program aimed to change the school's organizational climate and performance. The school was recruited through the person in charge for development in the district, who identified it as a school in decline, a school that needed support to start a change. The principals, the teachers, the students and their parents were informed about the program and could avoid participating. The design of the program was approved by the regional ethical committee. The program adopted an approach that combined elements of research diffusion development and evidence-based practices. The key principles were: information on theories and research on social climate and supportive relationships in learning environments, evaluations of students’ experiences, reflection and analysis, flexible adaptations to local issues, long-term, sustainable development. The study has a mixed methods approach (Teddlie & Tashakkori, 2010) and analyzes the data collected within the school during a three-year period. The data about the school organization and performance was collected through teacher surveys (organizational climate) student surveys (school climate) participation to meetings and workshops, and includes documents, reports, available official school statistics from the NAE, and the Swedish School Inspectorate.When the program started in Autumn 2009, Pine Hill school was in decline. After a period the crisis accentuated due to internal and external factors. Several developments and changes were introduced in the school organization during the following years. Pine Hill made a turnaround: the school has the best average qualification value among the municipal schools in the district and has consistently reduced the achievement gap between girls and boys. The students have better perceptions of the social climate (creativity, safety, helpfulness, participation and influence). At Pine Hill all the subjects are considered important and the esthetic-practical activities are highly valued. The students' number has increased, which make it possible to recruit new teachers. The mission of inclusive education and participation is important for the staff and they are involved in several new research projects. Besides the special unit for students with special educational needs Pine Hill plans to give place to recently immigrated students, a new commission from the school district. Nevertheless, a recent report of the Inspectorate found reason to yet give criticism to several aspects of the school functioning. The changes and development are analyzed and related to research and theories of organizational change.

  • 9.
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Simple-minded accountability measures create failure schools in disadvantaged contexts: a case study of a Swedish junior high school2013In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 11, no 4, 331-363 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principles of new public management – market mechanisms, accountability and standards – have been applied in the education system. These methods are supposed to increase efficiency, but there is also a risk of negative consequences from the services provided if the measures of performance target a reduced range of goals, ignore relevant variables or are not valid measures. Indicators used to compare schools’ performance are aggregate measures, such as the percentage of students who have access to secondary education and the average qualification value. This study reports how accountability policy and procedures may affect the functioning of the education system through the case study of a school serving a diverse student population. The school organisation was influenced by measures of performance, external events and contextual and selection variables. The average qualification value measure seems to be a limited measure of performance at the school level, since it largely reflects school composition and school segregation. Even the available performance measures adjusted for background variables do not take account of relevant variables that may influence the school’s need of resources and its results, such as students’ language proficiency and special educational needs. Other performances that are not easily measured – such as the prevention of dropout, improvement of school attendance and provision of an equitable education for all students – are disregarded. Schools serving those students with the most needs risk being penalised by an approximate and restricted range of accountability systems because there is a risk that the schools will appear to be failing when they are working with more complex and advanced tasks than average schools. Based on these inaccurate performance measurements, the school may be targeted with wide-ranging, severe and basically unjust interventions.

  • 10.
    Andersen, Camilla Eline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Mot en mindre profesjonalitet: "Rase", tidlig barndom og Deleuzeoguattariske blivelser2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with professionalism in early childhood education in relation to «race» and whiteness in primarily a Norwegian landscape. The overall aim of the study is to investigate how sociomaterial «race»-events can be understood as constitutive of preschool teachers’ subjectivity. The thesis is a theoretical experimentation with strong ties to a real social landscape. One of the main problems that the study evolves around is how «race» is silenced in the dominant discourse contributing to how preschool teachers can create socially just and indiscriminating pedagogical practices in a current «multicultural society». Hence, there seem to be a lack of tools for preschool teachers to think through how «race» might be part of their pedagogical practice in preschools, and how «race» is an important issue to address when working with how to perform pedagogy ethically and politically. More specifically and in a philosophical-theoretical manner, the study explores «white» preschool teachers’ relation to «race». The philosophical-theoretical-methodological conceptual toolbox for the study is mainly constructed from the philosophical work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (1977, 1987). E.g. machinic assemblage, stratification, Body without Organs, nomadic subject, affect, individuation, micropolitics, becoming, actual/virtual and event. The methodological approach is highly inspired by decolonizing-, feminist poststructural- and critical methodologies. However, immersed with Deleuze and Guattaris philosophy of desire, what started out as a poststructural autoethnography transformed into a cartography of «my own» racial becomings in/with an early childhood landscape. The study shows how subjectivity, when understood as produced through sociomaterial «race»-events, offers another understanding of doing professionalism. Further, it offers an alternative understanding of how to create more socially just pedagogical practices in early childhood education.

  • 11.
    Anderson, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Make a customer, not a sale: A study on customer's perception of loyalty programs2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish food retail industry is one with fierce competition, small product differentiation and increasingly disloyal customers. Consequently in order to create and retain loyal customers many of the stores offer some kind of loyalty schemes. The effectiveness of loyalty programs have been questioned, but it is proposed that in order for a loyalty program to be successful it must offer benefits that are perceived as valuable by customers. Thus the purpose of this qualitative study is to investigate how customers value loyalty programs and how this might affect them in a context where many companies reward their loyal customers. Customer perception of loyalty programs are considered to be grounded in multiple factors such as the design of the loyalty program as well as the competition in the industry. The empirical data was collected through semi-structured interviews with twelve respondents that shopped in a suburban area of Stockholm. The process of the study was influenced by the Grounded theory of method and as coding was used as the method of analysis, three themes related to how customers perceive reward components of loyalty program emerged: Offset of what I give and what I gain, Plan to have control of one’s finances and My perception of value is grounded in me.The findings of the study propose that a customer’s perception of reward components are influenced by what they are offered and by the overall design of the loyalty program. The most significant factor is however the customer self and where she is in life. This is displayed as different customers stated to have different reasons to join a loyalty program, mentioned different reward components as the most valuable one, highlighted different disadvantages as well as perceived the same reward components very differently.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Lars
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education.
    Militärt ledarskap - när det gäller: svenskt militärt ledarskap med fredsfrämjande insatser i fokus2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1996 peacekeeping operations are a high priority for the Swedish Defence Forces. The experiences from these operations will influence the future military lead-ership education and training and the writing of this thesis should be regarded from that perspective. My main purpose is to examine military leadership in order to im-prove the leadership education and training within the Swedish Defence Forces. I have posed three research questions. What important steps have been taken in the develop-ment of leadership within the Swedish Defence Forces during the last century? How does this development of military leadership stand out in relation to the development in other countries? How is military leadership managed in international operations?

    This thesis begins with a survey of the leadership in the Swedish, Norwegian, American, and Israeli armies. The central part comprises studies of two Swedish bat-talions in Bosnia. The leadership in the Swedish Defence Forces has a very good repu-tation, due to the extensive reforms in educational leadership. However, as a military commander it is not sufficient to be a good and successful educator. You are also ex-pected to be able to conduct your unit in peacekeeping operations as well as at war. In general Swedish officers have not had that kind of experience, foremost due to the fact that Sweden has not been in a war for almost 200 years.

    Throughout the case studies I have used a multi-method technique, in which an im-portant part of the method was direct observation. I stayed with a UN-battalion for three months and with another battalion, which was under NATO command, for one month. In the thesis I give an inside perspective of the leadership of the battalions in Bosnia. I illustrate different leadership problems that have appeared throughout my study and describe the environment that the peacekeepers lived and worked in. In the discussion I change focus from the two case studies to the socialization process of the Swedish officers. I relate to the French sociologist Bourdieus´ theoretical concepts when I explain the role-conflict that Swedish officers are facing during international operations. The Swedish Defence College has started a programme to develop leader-ship for the twenty-first century. The biggest challenge is to deal with the general per-spective of the whole organization and its core values in relationship to the role of leadership. Other challenges are the insufficient coordination in the military leadership education and the existing communication problems between different officer groups. I wrap up the thesis with a proposal of a strategy that will help the progression of the Swedish military leadership.

  • 13.
    Andersson Tallec, Nina
    Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Centre for the study of children's culture.
    BARNS TANKAR OM LYCKA: En kvalitativ undersökning av barns subjektiva uppfattning om lycka2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie syftar till att undersöka vad lycka är och betyder för barn, enligt hypotesen att lyckan tenderar vara en central del i livet, där barns föreställningar kan tänkas ligga närmre psykologernas uppfattningar om lycka än filosofernas, då dessa de senares uppfattningar är mer komplicerade och mångdimensionella. Ansatsen är att jämföra barns uttalanden med forskningsrön kring lycka. Studien har sin utgångspunkt i ett filosofiskt frågeställande förhållningssätt, med den positiva psykologin som ram. Undersökningen presenteras i form av en deskriptiv studie av 121 barns reflektioner kring lycka. Den är huvudsakligen disponerad kring tre centrala delar: Vad lycka är, vilka förutsättningarna är för att bli och vara lycklig samt vad som medverkar till individens lycka. Studiens resultat visar till stor del på ett bekräftande av tidigare forskning. Barnens tankar om lycka är tätt sammanhängande med livsbejakande positiva känslor. Resultaten visar på vikten av det oumbärliga i nära relationer samt individens behov av aktivitet. Ytterligare visar resultaten på att människans inre upplevelser samt den egna inställningen inverkar på individens upplevelse kring lycka mer än vad påverkan från de omgivande yttre omständigheterna gör. Barnen uttrycker också i motsvarighet till flertalet vetenskapliga studiers utfall, att lyckans betydelse är så högt värderad att den i övervägande antal fall ses vara skäl till att leva. I studien redovisas också relativt nya resultat inom neurobiologisk forskning samt inom den positiva psykologins fält avseende lycka. Dessa visar på den tämligen entydiga slutsatsen att den mänskliga lyckonivån skapas och är påverkbar genom individens egna ageranden samt inre påverkan av de mentala processerna, hela livet. Studiens resultat visar att barnens uppfattningar inte befinner sig nära psykologernas resonemang, vilket inledningsvis var studiens antagande, utan snarare överensstämmer dessa med filosofernas tankegångar.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Therése
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Costume Cinema and Materiality: Telling the Story of Marie Antionette through Dress2011In: Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 3, no 1, 101-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Therése
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Fashion, Market and Materiality: Along the Seams of Clothing2011In: Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 3, no 1, 13-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Family therapy and accountability2012In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 9, no 2, 193-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Baheram, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Nollalternativ i en miljökonsekvensbeskrivning2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study of the zero alternatives in an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) constitutes a thesis in the Master's program in Environmental Management and Physical Planning at the Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology at Stockholm University. The work has also been produced in collaboration with WSP Civils.

    In the current situation, it seems to lack a clear consensus over how the zero alternatives in an EIA should be formulated and managed. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes towards the zero alternatives (or the no-action alternative) in an EIA and try to give a better understanding of how the alternative should be managed. Therefore, this study describes what the purpose and function of the zero alternatives have in an EIA, together with the aspects that should be considered when dealing with zero alternatives in an EIA.

    The study was conducted using four different methods that together should be able to answer the study's purpose and issues. To provide a better understanding the empirical data was connected to theories of prediction, uncertainties and scenarios in an EIA.

    The results of the study indicate that the purpose of the zero alternatives in an EIA is to put a plan or a project into context, and therefore fulfill an important function. It is important in an EIA to illustrate the uncertainty that exists in the predictions made about the future, which are the basis for the assessments that are made. This is also important for the zero alternatives. Regarding the uncertainty, it is also necessary to consider whether it in all circumstances is appropriate to use the zero alternatives as a reference alternative in relation to the other alternatives in the EIA. The Swedish Environmental Code also has two definitions that describe the zero alternatives, depending on whether it is a plan or a project the EIA should describe. This distinction is unfortunately not always visible in practice.

    During the study, it emerged that there is a demand for advice and recommendations for dealing with zero alternatives in an EIA. One hope is that this study will generate a greater knowledge of the handling of zero alternatives in an EIA.

  • 18.
    Bakardjieva Engelbrekt, Antonina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, The European Law Institute.
    Michalski, AnnaOxelheim, Lars
    EU och de nya säkerhetshoten2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bakardjieva Engelbrekt, Antonina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, The European Law Institute.
    Mårtensson, Moa
    Oxelheim, Lars
    Persson, Thomas
    The EU’s Role in Fighting Global Imbalances2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU’s Role in Fighting Global Imbalances looks at the role of the European Union in addressing some of the greatest challenges of our time: poverty, protectionism, climate change, and human trafficking. Contributions from ten leading scholars in the fields of economics, law, and political science provide in-depth analyses of three key dimensions of EU foreign policy, namely: the internal challenges facing the EU, as its 28 member countries struggle to coordinate their actions; the external challenges facing the EU on the global arena, in areas where global imbalances are particularly pervasive, and where measures taken by the Union can have an important impact; and the EU´s performance on the global arena, in the eyes of other key actors. Based on a broad and interdisciplinary understanding of the concept of global imbalances, this book argues that these challenges follow from pervasive global imbalances, which at root are economic, political, and legal in character.

  • 20.
    Banér, Anne
    Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Centre for the study of children's culture.
    Kulturarvingarna, typ! Vad ska barnen ärva och varför?2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Beckley, Amber L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Correlates of War? Towards an understanding of nativity-based variation in immigrant offending2013In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 10, no 4, 408-423 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses Swedish register data to assess the impact of war in the home country on the individual likelihood of registered violent crime among young male immigrants in Stockholm, Sweden. War in the home country during a migrant’s residence is significantly related to a higher likelihood of registration for a violent crime. However, these results were not sustained in a sensitivity analysis, which considered serious property crime. Analysis of the history of war in the home country produces effects opposite to those predicted, with more years of war reducing the likelihood of violent crime. These findings indicate that war is capturing other factors, within the home or the receiving country, that may be related to violent crime.

  • 22.
    Beckman, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Lindström, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sjögren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Wärn, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Globalization, imperialism and resistance: an introduction2007In: Globalization, imperialism and resistance / [ed] Lars Lindström, Mats Wärn and Björn Beckman, Stockholm: Politics of Development Group (PODSU), Department of Political Science, Stockholm University , 2007, 1-13 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Beckman, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Widmalm, S.
    Tunlid, A.
    Efterord2009In: Vetenskapens sociala strukturer: Sju historiska om konflikt, samverkan och makt., Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Bendt, Pim
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social Learning and Diversity of Practice in Community Gardens in Berlin2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Genuine advancement towards sustainable development requires broad-based popular supportfor prioritising the environment in our pursuit of social and economic progress. Since citieshave become the dominant human habitat of the century, it is especially critical that urbanpopulations adopt such sentiments. Yet, rapid urbanisation is severing perceived andexperienced links between people and nature, engendering an ‘extinction-of-experience’ asmodern life-styles are adopted and we cease to depend on local resources.Interdisciplinary perspectives on social learning suggest that communities that practicallyengage with nature constitute key forums for the creation and storage of knowledge andexperiences.This study goes further by investigating social learning and practice in locally managed greenareas which are also open to the public, in order to explore their capacity to nurtureexperienced based learning among wider sets of urban citizens. Extensive participatoryobservation and in-depth interviews have been conducted in a number of community gardensin Berlin over a period of 6 months.Findings show that community gardens support institutionally diverse sets of locally anchoredcommunities-of-practice where experienced based learning about nature is generated andstored.. Interestingly, local practice also nurtured experienced based learning about social,political and economic dimensions of life in the city.It is suggested that such open and experimental form of green area management hold promisefor tackling extinction-of-experience among the distinctively heterogeneous urbanpopulations of today. It also contends that community gardens foster progress towardssustainability on the local level through intertwining ecological and social concerns inlearning and practice on the ground.

  • 25.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Collaborative assessment and game development: professionals’ orientation towards problems, potentials and organizational demands2014In: 4th International Conference Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper address assessment practice as part of professional activity and learning in the domain of game development. A growing body of research has been concerned with the professionalization of games production knowledge, frequently attributed to the coordinated work of numerous actors in technology dense settings. While previous accounts of games development list a multifaceted body of knowledge, there is a gap in the literature focusing on game developers’ professional knowing and learning in situ. With an analytical approach informed by ethnomethodology, this paper aim to make visible professional knowledge and learning when collaboratively evaluating games-in-development. It is focusing on game developers’ assessment work as a way to gain insight in the practical reasoning when orienting towards games and gaming as subject of assessment, and as a way of making professional knowledge bases explicit.

           The empirical material is drawn from three settings: 1) a vocational game education, 2) a national game award event, and 3) a professional game development company. Based on fieldwork augmented with video-recordings, the study investigates how games-in-development are collaborative assessed and specifically the ways professionals evaluate co-workers views and understandings with respect to what constitutes problems and potentials of games-in-development.

           Assessments are at stake in a number of internal and external work practices, such as gate reviews, playtests, and the activity of pitching not-yet-finished-nor-financed games to publishers. Games assessments are a common preoccupation at game companies and game education but also at so-called game awards. Games assessments share similarities with assessment practices in other professional and educational settings, such as design reviews in architectural practices. Both are events where proposals are assessed by externally recruited professionals. However, the assessment activities and object of assessment largely differ. In architectural education, proposals are assessed by considering the qualities visible in the designed material (such as plans, paper posters and digital slideshows) in relation to articulated intentions. This can be contrasted with the object of criticism in games presentations: the object constitutes both digitally visual material and designed ‘playable/interactive’ activities. This means that the qualities of a game cannot only be judged by interpreting the idea communicated in plain words together with some visual layout, it also has to be discovered when engaging with the designed ‘experience’. Hence, professionals’ in the gaming domain are required to account for what hinders or make possible appealing experiences during assessments of digital games.

           By focusing on professionals’ collaborative assessments, the analysis unpacks some recurrent orientations towards games and gaming in professional settings. It is shown that the professionals are faced with a number of institutional and organizational demands with respect to time, technology, conventions, and innovations.

  • 26.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Searching for the best game: professionals’ jury work at a national game-award event2014In: The Second International ProPEL: Professional Practice, Education and Learning Conference, June 25-27, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates jury-based assessment work as part of professional activity in an emerging profession, the gaming industry. Drawing on prior studies of professional learning (Mäkitalo, 2012), jury deliberations (Garfinkel, 1976), and assessment practices in related settings, assessment is approached as a way of making professional knowledge and learning visible. With an analytical focus informed by ethnomethodology, the paper builds on the idea that detailed studies of local orders of collaborative assessment in creative organizations could contribute to the understanding of assessment in professional learning.

    Although previous research on games development point to a multifaceted body of knowledge and considered its development in terms of professionalization (cf. Bennerstedt, 2013), there is a lack of empirical studies of professional game developers practices, particularly addressing the key object of criticism - the games. Games assessments are not only a common preoccupation at game companies and in game education, but also at so-called game awards where novices send in playable demos. Games evaluations share similarities with assessment practices in other professional and educational settings, such as design reviews in architectural practices (Lymer, 2010). However, the assessment activities and object of assessment largely differ, as the qualities of playable games have to be discovered interactively and therefore include a range of learning trajectories and troubles.

    Based on fieldwork augmented with video-recordings at a game café, the paper explores a small group of invited professionals’ assessment when reviewing a large number of game demos for a national game award event. By focusing on collaborative work conducted in private deliberations, it is shown that the professionals are faced with a number of challenges when ranking and grading the demos. They discover problems and qualities with the games by taking departure in fixed categories, established standards and emergent criteria, but make collaborative decisions that are governed by the jury members’ varied access to the assessed demos. The variations with respect to access are tightly related to the time schedule of the reviewing, but also the design of the interactive material. They accomplished their work by drawing on jury members’ as well as organizers’ access to, and knowledge of, demos in terms of playability, progression, emergence, visual appearance, technical solutions, etc. Critical for overcoming knowledge gaps are the ways the jury manages access by engaging in hybrid activities, i.e. moving between assessments and instructions/demonstrations of demos.

    Pedagogical implications of the analysis are discussed, and it is suggested that the jury-based assessment of digital material shed new light on how professionals deal with ad hoc learning and instruction.

     

    References

    Bennerstedt, U. (2013). Knowledge at play: Studies of games as members’ matters. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.

    Garfinkel, H. (1967). Studies in ethnomethodology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

    Lymer, G. (2010). The work of critique in architectural education. Göteborg, Sweden: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.

    Mäkitalo, Å. (2012). Professional learning and the materiality of social practice. Journal of Education and Work, 25(1), 59-78.

  • 27.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Showcasing playable demos via design conventions: game students’ presentations of multimodal phenomena in a jurybased assessment environment2014In: the 4th International Designs for Learning Conference, expanding the field., Stockholm, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Benzie, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Social Justice and Adaptation in the UK2012In: Symposium: The Governance of Adaptation, 22-23 March 2012, Amsterdam, Netherlands: Programme and Abstracts, 2012, 37- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Berg, Alicia
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Empowering the Steel Industry as a Stakeholder: Environmental Management and Communication through a Social-Ecological Approach2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores a case study of a Swedish tool steel company undergoing a transition from traditional environmental management practices to an enterprise identifying its place as part of a social-ecological system. The Corporate Ecosystem Services Review (ESR) was utilized by the company to begin this process by focusing on ecosystem services to determine how an ESR approach contributes to environmental management in practice. What resulted moved beyond the ESR to a tailored methodology, the internalization of a systems perspective, and a proposed new environmental management system.

    The results of the study provide a concrete, effective method for internalizing a systems perspective through a focus on ecosystems and presents a case for further analysis into what made it successful. It also provides an example of translating theory into practice, illustrating how a company can engage in sustainable development by valuing and managing the resilience of social-ecological systems through identifying their place in that system. The value of the results can be high for the case study company as well as for business in general.

  • 30.
    Berg, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Evaluating Quality of Online Behavior Data2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has two purposes; emphasizing the importance of data quality of Big Data, and identifying and evaluating potential error sources in JavaScript tracking (a client side on - site online behavior clickstream data collection method commonly used in web analytics). The importance of data quality of Big Data is emphasized through the evaluation of JavaScript tracking. The Total Survey Error framework is applied to JavaScript tracking and 17 nonsampling error sources are identified and evaluated. The bias imposed by these error sources varies from large to small, but the major takeaway is the large number of error sources actually identified. More work is needed. Big Data has much to gain from quality work. Similarly, there is much that can be done with statistics in web analytics.

  • 31.
    Berggren, Maja
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Is Growing Larger the Same as Becoming Resilient? A case study of the Gothenburg Pelagic Offshore Fishery2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Scale enlargement and increased use of market mechanisms to improve fisheries’ management are a trend in many fisheries. These developments have economic benefits, but can also lead to loss of social-ecological knowledge, resilience, and employment opportunities in fishing communities. Successful large-scale fishers who have access to quotas benefit from these trends, but they also risk ending up in a lock-in, where a high degree of specialisation of fishing activities makes them vulnerable to economic and ecological fluctuation. Economic theory explains scale enlargement as an effect of economies of scale, but it cannot explain why these effects occur for certain groups of fishers and not for others. This study addresses this knowledge gap by exploring a small group of pelagic offshore fishers in Gothenburg, Sweden, who stand out in terms of their scale enlargement, profitability and political influence. Recently they also contributed to a change of management system towards increased use of economic management tools (Individual Transferable Quotas, ITQs). Using interviews with actors within and outside the pelagic offshore fishery, combined with participant observations, I describe a number of factors that can explain the Swedish development towards scale enlargement. Important for this development, it seems, is the fishers’ ‘entrepreneurial spirit’ and flexibility towards changing conditions. These are qualities that, in turn, have been supported by different contextual factors including abundant pelagic stocks, regulatory changes and a supportive community culture. Understanding the interaction between fishers’ activities and contextual developments can highlight why, and how, different development trajectories emerge in fisheries.

  • 32.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, Ingela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Karriär utifrån ett ansträngnings- och belöningsperspektiv2017In: HR: Att ta tillvara mänskliga resurser / [ed] Helene Ahl, Ingela Bergmo-Prvulovic, Karin Kilhammar, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2017, 77-94 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bergmo-Prvulovic, Ingela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kilhammar, Karin
    HR-arbete med balans och integritet2017In: HR: Att ta tillvara mänskliga resurser / [ed] Helene Ahl, Ingela Bergmo-Prvulovic, Karin Kilhammar, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2017, 257-274 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Bergsten, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Fragmented landscapes: Assessment and communication of landscape connectivity in human-dominated landscapes2012Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis summarizes the first half of my PhD on the theme of management of fragmented landscapes. The thesis applies – and reflects on the use of – network analysis of connectivity in relation to landscape planning. Relevant theory on knowledge management and spatial ecology is summarized and discussed in connection with two papers.

    Paper I centers on municipal ecologists and environmental planners in the Stockholm region. They state that connectivity is rarely considered enough in planning and that assessment tools are lacking. Paper I studies the benefits and difficulties of using network analysis to manage connectivity in land-use planning. Among the main difficulties was the choice of model species and access to input data. The main strengths were the graphical and quantitative results, the potential for social learning, identification of critical sites and to relate local planning and ecology to the regional landscape.

    Paper II applies network methodology to quantify habitat availability of fragmented lichen-type forests in protected areas in northern Sweden. It studies a dynamic landscape that is continuously rearranged by forestry, with consequences that depend on species’ abilities to compete for resources in protected habitats, and to disperse through unprotected mature forest stands. We discuss the results with reference to the planning of forestry and protected areas, and to the resilience of species to patchy disturbance regimes.

    To end I propose a continuation of research, including a methodological development of network analysis; a sociological study of the acceptance of ecological advice in urban planning; and an integration of social and ecological network analysis to compare patterns of cross-municipal collaboration with landscape connectivity.

  • 35.
    Berry, Margaret
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Slow Food in Transition: A study of niche development in Stockholm2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food systems represent one of the most critical resources under threat as a result of an unsustainable dominant regime. It is essential that the agricultural sector and food systems be addressed in order to achieve systemic and lasting change for sustainable development. This study uses transition theory’s strategic niche management approach to analyze a social innovation focused on creating systemic change within the currently unsustainable food system regime in order to influence a sustainability transition, using Slow Food Stockholm (a local level grassroots and social-ecological innovation niche) as a case study. Theoretically informed practical recommendations are given to help the Stockholm Slow Food movement grow and diffuse beyond its niche: to address social network weaknesses by broadening and strengthening relationships with underrepresented groups as well as resourceful and mainstream regime actors; to strengthen learning processes by fostering second-order learning through the creation of a platform for active and critical contemplation and knowledge sharing regarding niche growth and niche related topics; to manage expectations more realistically by identify and clarify niche goals for both the long term and the short term using tangible projects to stimulate involvement and concrete action opportunities for activists. Finally, reflections are given regarding remaining research gaps and the need for further studies relating to innovations for sustainable food system transitions. 

  • 36.
    Biggs, R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Carpenter, S.R.
    Brock, W.A.
    Turning back from the brink: Detecting an impending regime shift in time to avert it2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS, ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 3, 826-831 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Where is food 'good to think'?: Rationalities of food and place in Sweden and France2013In: Social Science Information, ISSN 0539-0184, E-ISSN 1461-7412, Vol. 52, no 1, 159-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Where is food 'good to think'? This comparative study describes the mental foodscapes of Swedish and French people by asking them to say where, in time and space, they would go to in order to eat well. Both the Swedish and French respondents say they would avoid the US and fast-food establishments in order to eat well, but while the French in general point inward, toward the countryside of their region a couple of decades ago, the Swedes, in their choices, want to go far away, to the Mediterranean region, South-east Asia or an abstract wilderness. The article argues that the reason for these differences is that consumers in these two countries use different dominant rationalities to judge the food of different places - a nutritional rationality in Sweden and a rationality of origin in France - and it proceeds to identify the politico-historical roots of these rationalities. Finally, it argues that while each rationality makes a certain set of food and place qualities cognizable and judgeable, others, such as exotic foods in France and conviviality in Sweden, are left non-cognizable and difficult to judge.

  • 38.
    Bivall, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande.
    Bennerstedt, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Co-evaluated quality in new occupational groups - Professional vision in digitalized work2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitalization of working life has lead to extensively changed conditions for work in both classical and emergent professional groups. In classical professional groups, e.g. within healthcare, impacts of such changes in daily work has attracted attention in various research communities focussing among other on adaptations in ways of working or changed patterns of collaboration. However, as a consequence of the society’s digitalization of work and leisure practices, new occupational settings and professional groups have emerged where it can be argued that new forms of knowledge and competence have evolved and become highly specialized. Among these professional groups a recurrent activity is assessment and evaluations of end-services and products. During assessment activities colleagues orient towards digital tools, designs and activities by negotiating understandings of quality. Yet, the work practices of such emerging occupational groups are unexplored in relation to how work is constituted and how professional knowledge becomes a subject matter among the professionals themselves. In this paper, we address these questions by exploring the conditions for collaborative work between colleagues in the IT support sector and computer game development industry. The aim is to explore how professional knowledge and competence are displayed and negotiated during different forms of assessment activities. Theoretically and methodologically we study naturally occurring activities of working life with a focus on participant interaction and the participants’ ways of orienting towards phenomena relevant for conducting work. In the paper, Goodwin’s (1994) notion of professional vision is central for teasing out the participants’ ways of assessing features relevant for the community of practice and making visible local knowledge and learning in the professional field. The empirical materials consist of video recordings from evaluation practices from a global IT support and from a game award event with participants from the computer game industry. Preliminary findings point to participant driven textual and interactional practices of negotiation. In these negotiations domain specific knowledge is displayed by participants through forward oriented reasoning and by addressing the relation between the particular case and general aspects of that case. The paper illustrates these findings by exploring practices deeply connected to work activities and settings as well as products. In the IT support milieu, collaborative assessment activities separated from the daily handling of support errands found a basis for discussing and developing ways of working. The forward oriented assessment orientation by participants is shown in cases where documented errands in IT-systems are reviewed and reformulated into suggestions of future actions by explicating local knowledge emerged within the organization. The participants in the game evaluation setting rely on hands on and “back-seat gaming” as assessment practices in order to establish shared access to the phenomena being assessed, and via such demonstrations negotiate particular game demos qualities and potentials in the future in relation to established game genres. In both settings, individual cases are used in different ways as textual and interactional resources for highlighting ways of seeing more general characters adhering to specific cultural values and organizational issues for the particular occupational group.

  • 39.
    Björk, Nicola
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Opportunities and obstacles implementing animal welfare friendly meat to the Swedish public catering sector2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Provision of meat to public catering canteens in Sweden is done through public procurement processes according to the Law of Public Procurement. However, due to the lack of a harmonized assessment standard and policy for communication throughout the supply chain, there is no animal welfare certification or label that contracting authorities can use to verify animal welfare friendly meat, in order to verify that the meat they purchase comes from reliable sources. My question is; is there a future in which animal welfare friendly meat is provided as the norm, to consumers at public canteens? To answer this question, the aim of this thesis was to identify a feasible way for Swedish wholesale dealers who provide food to the public sector, to implement meat originating from a source where animal-based assessments have been made according to the Welfare Quality® project.

    The findings showed that the top four critical elements to consider for an animal welfare friendly future are: 1. The consciousness and attitude by each stakeholder – a positive attitude among not only supply chain actors but also among the decision makers eases the process to bring animal welfare friendly meat. 2. The local political vision - in order for contracting authorities to work proactively towards bringing animal welfare friendly meat the political vision is fundamental. 3. A united legislation on animal welfare friendly systems in EU - based upon an animal-based assessment standard. 4. The Law of Public Procurement and its stance on an animal welfare friendly production – the requirements that can be set from an animal-based assessment system needs to be compatible with the Law of Public Procurement. Further research on the specific findings is recommended in order to deeper evaluate the needs to implement animal welfare friendly meat to Swedish public catering canteens. 

  • 40.
    Björkin Säll, Karin
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Walking the talk: Political consumers and their information search towards more sustainable consumption choices2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Political consumers, by using their consumerism to make political statements, constitute a potential force in changing global consumption patterns towards more sustainable ones. Thus new insights concerning this specific group and its ways of searching for information prior to a purchase decision might help understand the mechanisms behind sustainable consumption choices. This study is based on a series of twelve personal qualitative interviews conducted with Swedish consumers of sustainable goods. These interviews confirmed certain characteristics known to political consumers, such as a high level of commitment, high standards regarding information and the frequent use of labelling schemes. Furthermore this study has shown the complexity experienced by this group of consumers regarding sustainability claims and the role of a chosen “sustainability champion” in helping make sense of this complex information. Finally this study reminds of the significance of respecting the consumer and his trust for a message as well as the need for simple and clear information tools to distinguish proper sustainable goods from others.

  • 41.
    Björklund, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Eco-gastronomy: creative food for transformation2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Present-day food systems are characterised by industrial mass-production and are becoming exceedingly untenable from a social, ecological and economic perspective. The era of favourable growing conditions and stability is no longer guaranteed, and arguments for holistic and transformative solutions are raised, that can reconnect humanity to the biosphere and create resilient food systems. The overall aim of this study is to describe eco-gastronomy within a Swedish context, and to explore its potential to act as an incubator for change within the foodservice sector. The findings contribute to the transformation framework with contextual understanding on how sub-processes (in the preparation phase) play out in an eco-gastronomic context. One of the main challenges for the future and viability of eco-gastronomy is associated with limited supply and access to high quality and sustainable Swedish produce. Food professionals envision and innovate new pathways through social-ecological innovation, network building, novel organization and close collaboration (e.g. knowledge exchange, feedback). Collaborative efforts are made to support diversity, quality and access to eco-gastronomic produce. However, eco-gastronomic practices are both adaptive and transformative, and a potential trade-off is outlined between the goal of achieving an extensive change in food preferences and transformative production practices. Low social sustainability (e.g. low salaries) and small networks can threaten the longevity and expansion of eco-gastronomy. However, networks are growing in size and number, and a new type of food awareness is described, that in extension can become a seed to a more sustainable food culture. Eco-gastronomy is not a blueprint for resilient food systems but it provides solutions that can result in a more sustainable and delicious future. 

  • 42.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Explaining the decline in Swedish Baltic Sea small-scale fisheries: A historical analysis of fishers in their  social and ecological context2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish fisheries, as many other European fisheries are characterized by overcapacity. Efforts trying to reduce the overcapacity have led to fewer but bigger vessels. Hence, fish catches are aggregated among fewer and fewer fishers with bigger and bigger boats while problems with overcapacity remain. Instead, it is the fishers with smaller vessels that faced major declines and the Swedish Baltic Sea small-scale fisheries (SSF) have been identified to soon disappear. A disappearance would be unfortunate because SSF represent values that could be used in the development towards more ecological and social sustainable fisheries. The decline of SSF appears to be structural persistent, produced by factors interacting over time. To address the negative trend, it is essential to know how and why the decline became structural persistent. The objective of this study is therefore to investigate the long-term historical development of the SSF as a social-ecological system. A mixed-method approach was used to assess and identify interactions between fishers and contextual factors over time. The results show how the decline became structurally persistent in 1960s after a conjunction in time where fishers’ livelihood became more dependent upon fisheries while fish abundance started to decline. After the conjunction fishers became trapped within a system where social and ecological contextual factors constrained their fishing practices. This thesis provides new insights on the difficult situation in which SSF are currently trapped. These insights can be used for future development of Swedish fisheries, which needs to move away from increased economic optimization and instead enhance long-term sustainability.

  • 43.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Att sluta missbruka - med eller utan samhällets hjälp2011In: Narkotika. Om problem och politik. / [ed] Börje Olsson, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik , 2011, 161-185 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sjukdom, dålig vana, livsstil eller social konstruktion?: Om olika uppfattningar om missbruk och beroende och deras konsekvenser.2012In: Samhället, alkoholen och drogerna.: Politik, konstruktioner och dilemman. / [ed] Jessica Storbjörk, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag , 2012, 14-43 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Bocké, Alice
    Stockholm University, interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hållbart skogsbruk och naturvård – ett skogsägarperspektiv2008Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government has set up 16 environmental goals for Sweden to achieve. One of

    them is “Living forests”, which is the foundation for the “National strategy for the formal

    protection of forests”. The “National strategy” puts the private forest owner at the centre of

    attention in order to achieve the environmental goal “Living forests”. Adaptive Management

    could help with the implementation of the “National strategy”. 9 qualitative interviews have

    been done in order to examine how the communication between private forest owners and

    responsible authorities works. The interviews give the private forest owners’ perspective, and

    what they want the communication to be like, when it comes to conservation biology.

    Communication, language, and how to deal with conservation biology have been the main

    issues brought up during the interviews. The private forest owners also demand more

    flexibility and a keener ear from responsible authorities. The private forest owners would like

    a better knowledge of what is happening when it comes to conservation biology on their land.

    The private forest owners and the responsible authorities do have similar goals for what they

    want to achieve with the forest, but they disagree on how to achieve that goal.

  • 46.
    Bodin, Ö
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, B
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
     The role of social networks in natural resource governance:: What relational patterns make a difference?2009In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 19, 366-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Collaborative environmental governance: Achieving collective action in social-ecological systems2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 357, no 6352, 659-+ p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing ecosystems is challenging because of the high number of stakeholders, the permeability of man-made political and jurisdictional demarcations in relation to the temporal and spatial extent of biophysical processes, and a limited understanding of complex ecosystem and societal dynamics. Given these conditions, collaborative governance is commonly put forward as the preferred means of addressing environmental problems. Under this paradigm, a deeper understanding of if, when, and how collaboration is effective, and when other means of addressing environmental problems are better suited, is needed. Interdisciplinary research on collaborative networks demonstrates that which actors get involved, with whom they collaborate, and in what ways they are tied to the structures of the ecosystems have profound implications on actors' abilities to address different types of environmental problems.

  • 48.
    Boonstra, Wiebren Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Masterson, Vanessa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Human responses to social-ecological traps2016In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 11, no 6, 877-889 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological (SE) traps refer to persistent mismatches between the responses of people, or organisms, and their social and ecological conditions that are undesirable from a sustainability perspective. Until now, the occurrence of SE traps is primarily explained from a lack of adaptive capacity; not much attention is paid to other causal factors. In our article, we address this concern by theorizing the variety of human responses to SE traps and the effect of these responses on trap dynamics. Besides (adaptive) capacities, we theorize desires, abilities and opportunities as important additional drivers to explain the diversity of human responses to traps. Using these theoretical concepts, we construct a typology of human responses to SE traps, and illustrate its empirical relevance with three cases of SE traps: Swedish Baltic Sea fishery; amaXhosa rural livelihoods; and Pamir smallholder farming. We conclude with a discussion of how attention to the diversity in human response to SE traps may inform future academic research and planned interventions to prevent or dissolve SE traps.

  • 49. Boréus, Kristina
    et al.
    Bergström, GöranStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Analyzing Text and Discourse: Eight Approaches for the Social Sciences2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Boyd, E
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Grist, N
    Juhola, S
    Nelson, V
    Climate change and development futures.2009In: Development Policy Review, ISSN 0950-6764, E-ISSN 1467-7679, Vol. Special Issue: Climate Change and Development FuturesArticle in journal (Refereed)
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