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  • 1.
    Abougazar, Eman Silmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
      Barriers to equal access to eHealth in Stockholm  : A qualitative study2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim behind this study was to observe and understand barriers to access the eHealth system equally. The study was conducted in Stockholm based on qualitative data in which semi- structured interviews were conducted among 15 interviewees from different localities of Stockholm. The findings from the collected data revealed that language barriers, lack of knowledge about digital literacy, unawareness of Swedish healthcare services, psychological and social barriers, safety and privacy concerns, and the lack of an e-identification are all major barriers to accessing the eHealth system. From the data, it has also been observed that the main causes of the aforementioned hurdles are based on varied socioeconomic levels, literacy conditions of an individual, cultural background, and age. Another important observation shows that highly qualified people with limited language abilities have a difficult time using eHealth services. 

    Keywords 

    Ehealth, Covid-19, nudge approach, digital literacy, linguistic skills, Bank ID, 1177.se, Alltid öppet. 

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  • 2.
    Andersson, Eva K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Costa, Rafael
    Sleutjes, Bart
    Stonawski, Marcin Jan
    de Valk, Helga A. G.
    A Comparative Study of Segregation Patterns in Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden: Neighbourhood Concentration and Representation of Non-European Migrants2018In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 251-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we use geo-coded, individual-level register data on four European countries to compute comparative measures of segregation that are independent of existing geographical sub-divisions. The focus is on non-European migrants, for whom aggregates of egocentric neighbourhoods (with different population counts) are used to assess small-scale, medium-scale, and large-scale segregation patterns. At the smallest scale level, corresponding to neighbourhoods with 200 persons, patterns of over- and under-representation are strikingly similar. At larger-scale levels, Belgium stands out as having relatively strong over- and under-representation. More than 55% of the Belgian population lives in large-scale neighbourhoods with moderate under- or over-representation of non-European migrants. In the other countries, the corresponding figures are between 30 and 40%. Possible explanations for the variation across countries are differences in housing policies and refugee placement policies. Sweden has the largest and Denmark the smallest non-European migrant population, in relative terms. Thus, in both migrant-dense and native-born-dense areas, Swedish neighbourhoods have a higher concentration and Denmark a lower concentration of non-European migrants than the other countries. For large-scale, migrant-dense neighbourhoods, however, levels of concentration are similar in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Thus, to the extent that such concentrations contribute to spatial inequalities, these countries are facing similar policy challenges.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Linn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Zhang, Qian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Chinese restaurant workers in Sweden: policies, patterns and social consequences2013Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 4.
    Barker, Vanessa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Criminalization of Migration: A Regional Transnational Legal Order or the Rise of a Meta-TLO2020In: Transnational Legal Ordering of Criminal Justice / [ed] Gregory Shaffer, Ely Aaronson, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020, p. 154-175Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the criminalization of migration through the lens of transnational legal orders (TLOs). By doing so, it seeks to explain dramatic episodes such as the Diciotti refugee incident in Italy, but also provide socio-legal analysis for far-reaching practices such as immigration detention, removal, and refusal of entry, all of which depend on the development of a formalizing legal order and specific regulation such as the EU Returns Directive that transcends national boundaries. It argues that affluent democratic societies of the Global North are in the middle of a major transformation of governance while transnational legal orders are at the center of it.

  • 5.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Incorporation of children of immigrants: the case of descendants of immigrants from Turkey in Sweden2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 2141-2159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigatehh ow children of immigrants fromTurkey are integrated into Swedish society. The educational achievements and labour market outcomes of this group are compared with the performance  of the offspring of native.born parents. The aim of the study is to explore whether we can observe a tendency towards 'downwards mobility' among young people of immigrant background in Sweden and thereby provide reflections on the existing fomulationof the 'segmented assimilation' theory.Findings show that descendants of immigrants seem not to be in the process of downward assimilation, that is social exclusion and therefore formation of a distinct' underclassin Sweden. The concept of 'subordinate inclusion' is a more appropriate description of the experiences of children of immigrants.

  • 6.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Social capital and stigmatised immigrants2009In: European perspectives on exclusion and subordination: the political economy of migration / [ed] Anders Neergaard, Maaschtrict: Shaker Publishing, 2009, p. 232-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University.
    The ethnic penalty: immigration, education and the labour market2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 915-916Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jonsson, Stefan
    Rasism: särskiljandets och rangordningens praktik2013In: Migrationens och etnicitetens epok: kritiska perspektiv i etnicitets- och migrationsstudier / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt, Anders Neergarard, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 168-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Goldscheider, Calvin
    Goldscheider, Frances
    What integrates the second generation?: Factors affecting family transitions to adulthood in Sweden2008In: International Migration in Europe: New trends and new methods of analysis, Amsterdam University Press , 2008, p. 225-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern studies.
    La misión liberal de Najeeb Saleeby: un sirio-estadounidense en la construcción del Imperio en el sur de Filipinas, 1900-19232023In: Misioneros del Capitalismo: Aventureros, hombres de negocios y expertos transnacionales en el siglo XIX / [ed] Darina Martykánová; Juan Pan-Montojo, Granada: Editorial Comares , 2023, p. 183-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the more enduring tropes of Euro-American expansionism is the racial uniformity of its promoters, its beneficiaries, and its victims. Aside from the self-indulgent claims of racial superiority and the corresponding missionary spirit of many European-origin imperial conquerors, recent scholarship reveals a much more diverse cadre of imperialist benefactors. Now cutting across the “white man’s” self-imposed divide that circulated by way of popular culture and scholarship, a new complexity to the power dynamics at play includes reassessing the profile of the frontiersmen, cowboys, settlers, pioneers, miners, and then state employees who brought modern capitalism’s empire to the far corners of the world.

    Properly telling the story of capitalist imperialism’s ascendancy still requires the register of deviance, deceit, greed, and criminal duplicity, but one that emanates from multiple layers of the society 19th century global capitalism created. Regularly acknowledged in the recent scholarship on colonialism, the conquests of other people’s lands did not come without the human components whose skills extended beyond simple murder, financial mendacity, and European origins. Thanks to a recent surge in rethinking the sociology of this nasty enterprise, the panoply of human agents contributing to the expansion of empire included men and women of very different origins, be it geographic, class, race, or religion. Indeed, the very fact such a diversity of humanity came to serve the brutal role of dislodging other people from their homelands demands new ways of writing modern history.

    In the following we explore possible ways of discovering and then making sense of those whose non-European, and thus non-White, backgrounds did not stop them from becoming an agent who used empire to secure greater social mobility. One particularly conspicuous beneficiary of European imperialism was the migrant sent to the colonial theatre to service capitalism’s comprehensive subjugation of others’ natural resources. From humble origins in the Middle East, East Asia, or throughout the Mediterranean were migrants so often celebrated in the media at the time for their overwhelming impact on the process of “expanding civilization” (Blumi 2013). The regular stories in newspapers and the expanding library of novels depicting this settlement of migrants regularly sold the myth of capitalism and “progress.” This discourse infiltrated the world, selling the promise of rewards of a “new life” for those willing to “work.” In this context, otherwise marginal people, often themselves victims of the same expansive capitalist system, became heroes of liberal-era capitalism by the often-coerced use of their “free” labor.

  • 11.
    Bohme Shomary, Wiji
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The Road From Damascus: New Arrival Immigrant Families and The Swedish Preschool2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this doctoral thesis is to examine the perceptions that new arrival immigrant families have of Swedish preschool, and the perceptions of these families as expressed by the Swedish state preschool political discourse over the last fifty-year period. For this purpose, the study uses critical discourse analysis, as proposed by Norman Fairclough. CDA is applied both as theory and as analytical method. The study is empirically grounded and borrows Fairclough’s three-dimensional model of discourse for the analysis of 19 texts produced by new arrival Syrian families, along with  policy documents, the reports of government commissions and government bills dealing with preschool in relation to immigration. The study focuses on two main themes that are predominant in both texts—language learning (Swedish and mother tongue) and belonging—and shows how they are used to express and assign agency.

    In the study, special attention is paid to the use of verbs, pronouns and adjectives as linguistic parameters for analyzing representations of relational and action processes, as well as social actor representations. The thesis consists of three empirical chapters: New Arrival Immigrant Families’ Discourse about Language Learning, New Arrival Immigrant Families’ Discourse about Belonging and Preschool, and New Arrival Immigrant Children as a Concern for Preschool. The first two chapters demonstrate a high degree of agency employed by the parents and their children in relation to language learning and being at preschool, reflected in their use of verbs and pronouns. The last chapter demonstrates how, over a period of fifty years, state preschool political discourse has perceived and constructed immigrant children and their parents in relation to preschool. 

    The analysis reveals points of convergence and divergence between the parents’ and the state’s discursive practices about preschool as a place for language learning and belonging. For instance, in the state discourse, immigrant children’s language learning and belonging are defined in terms of their needs and immigrant experience. In the parents’ writings, these themes are emphasized in relation to the children’s development and wellbeing. The study emphasizes the importance of culture-conscious work, in which the shared interests and expectations of both parties are highlighted, rather than only the differences in their views. Preschool is further discussed as presenting an ideological dilemma, allowing for contradictory ideals to coexist as a reflection of the political diversity of Swedish society.

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  • 12.
    Boman, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Adaptive Proculturation Process of Being a Psychotherapist as a Kazakh Asylum Seeker in Sweden2022In: Human Arenas, ISSN 2522-5790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term acculturation is important for describing and analyzing how for example migrants gradually become accustomed to a new host society. The term proculturation is similar but emphasizes the real-life experiences of migrants, as well as the fusion between familiar and unfamiliar ideas, things, and experiences. However, so far there is a dearth of studies which have aimed to explore such a construct empirically. The current article used a limited but meaningful example, the lived experiences of a Kazakh migrant in Sweden whose occupation is being a psychotherapist. The aim was to understand the cultural identity of this individual as regards processes of migration from A (Kazakhstan) to B (Sweden), as well as related proculturation processes. Moreover, the focus was also on the specific and precarious work conditions for a person who does not have the possibility to work officially as a psychotherapist during an extensive residence permit application process. Information derived from a semi-structured interview indicates that basic cultural identity markers (woman, Kazakh, Russian-speaking, Muslim) remained constant after residing in Sweden for more than 5 years but that some elements of the more secular-liberal Swedish culture (e.g., the Swedish language, increased alcohol consumption) were appropriated. The person used social media apps like WhatsApp as a technological tool to practice the profession as a psychotherapist in a transnational setting, which constitutes a different strategy than how Swedish as well as Kazakh psychotherapists generally perform this profession. 

  • 13.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Good ethnography smells bad: On aesthetic experience in qualitative research2008In: Sveriges antropologförbunds årliga konferens (SANT): Visuell kultur, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aesthetic learning processes are being notified in current Swedish pedagogical research. The philosophical term aesthetics is used in multiple modes, some of them borrowing an agenda from the studies of fine art, some more with inspiration from cultural studies and popular culture. In this emerging field both ethnography and every-day-aesthetics are in focus. Despite new ways of doing ethnography the results still tend to look (!) like traditional ethnography. Field-notes saturated with sensuous and stinking data; e.g. moist socks, sweaty t-shirts and car fumes, still tend to depend upon written texts and photography as scientific proof. Moreover ethnography is still judged against a positivistic framework drawing from natural science. Is a change required? And in that case, can the future of visual anthropology challenge this hegemonic scientific paradigm?

  • 14.
    Carbin, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Det problematiska systerskapet: Purpurfärgen och postkolonial feminism2008In: Feministisk teori i rörliga bilder / [ed] Katharina Tollin & Maria Törnqvist, Malmö: Liber , 2008, 2, p. 83-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Carbin, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Det problematiska systerskapet: Purpurfärgen och postkolonial feminism2005In: Feministisk teori i rörliga bilder / [ed] Katharina Tollin & Maria Törnqvist, Malmö: Liber , 2005, 1, p. 83-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Hertzberg, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Democracy the Swedish Way?: the Exclusion of ‘Immigrants’ in Swedish Politics2007In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 53-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Official declarations state that Sweden is today a multicultural society. At the same time, ethnichierarchies have become increasingly conspicuous in contemporary Sweden. Recently, a governmentalinquiry on structural discrimination in Swedish society presented a report analysing therelationship between the multi-ethnic composition of the Swedish population and participationin Swedish politics. This article discusses some of the main findings of the report. On the basisof a number of case studies, it illustrates how inequalities in terms of participation and influencein Swedish politics are (re)produced. One of the main conclusions drawn in the article is that allcitizens that participate in Swedish politics are faced with a series of routines, conventions and idea(l)scategorising citizens according to their perceived closeness to a Swedish ‘normality’. Thus, democracynot only constitutes a formalised system of impartial procedures and conventions, routines andnorms that regulate the political process in a way that guarantees freedom and equality to allparticipants. Rather, political participation also reflects exclusionary practices long well-documentedin, for example, the housing and labour markets. In order to understand these practices, itis necessary to examine the historical interconnections betweennationalismanddemocracy. Bymeans of the recurrent characterisation of Swedish democracy as specifically Swedish, it becomesthe job of Swedes to ‘enlighten’ the ‘immigrants’ to become ‘Swedish democrats’. This specificconceptualisation of democracy is founded on the ideal of an archaic national community, whichin contemporary multi-ethnic Sweden is not capable of including the whole population on equal terms.

  • 17. Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Olson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. Dalarna University, Sweden; University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Ana’s Tragedy – and Europe’s: A Contemplation over Romani, belonging and the conditioned citizenship making in a Europe of Migration2016In: European Journal of Futures Research, ISSN 2195-4194, E-ISSN 2195-2248, Vol. 4, no 1, article id UNSP 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the notion of belonging in today’s multi-ethnic Sweden and hints at perpectives of future European identity-building. On the basis of Frantz Fanon’s understanding of colonialism and the colonized mentality as theoretical, the article deals with the situation of Roma in Sweden – and Europe. With the story of a young Roma woman that has migrated to Sweden from Hungary as point of departure, the article addresses the situation for Romani people, but also for other migrants in Europe, with particular focus on who are allowed to belong to the community of Swedish and European citizens, and who are not.

  • 18.
    Dennison, James
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. European University Institute, Italy.
    Geddes, Andrew
    Thinking Globally about Attitudes to Immigration: Concerns about Social Conflict, Economic Competition and Cultural Threat2021In: Political quarterly (London. 1930. Print), ISSN 0032-3179, E-ISSN 1467-923X, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 541-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article looks globally at the motivations behind attitudes to immigration. Such motivations have been typically conceptualised by academics either in terms of the ‘economic competition’ or ‘cultural threat’ that immigrants are perceived to pose to the individual or their ‘in-group’. We propose and test a third possibility: that support for or opposition to immigration is determined by one's perceptions of immigration's effects on social conflict. Using the 2017–2020 World Values Survey (WVS) for forty-nine countries, we show that: in most countries, globally, citizens are more likely to agree than disagree that immigration leads to social conflict; levels of concern about the effects of immigration on social conflict are higher than those regarding unemployment or culture in sixteen—disproportionately economically developed—countries; concern about social conflict is conceptually and distributionally distinct; belief that immigration leads to social conflict predicts immigration policy preferences; but, uniquely, is positively predicted by higher education. Our findings highlight the importance of institutional conflict resolution capacity, including those related to integration, for the politics of migration. 

  • 19.
    Dingu-Kyrklund, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Citizenship, Migration, and Social Integration in Sweden: A Model for Europe?2007In: CERIS Working Paper No.52, January 2007, Toronto, Canada., no 52, p. 73-Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Transnational migration has been a constant element of human existence. Admission and

    integration of migrants has, in time, become an increasingly important element of decision-making

    policies in many nations. Classifications of voluntary and involuntary migrants according to their

    reasons for migrating and the socio-economic and political reasons for the acceptance of such

    individuals by the receiving countries have been the object of numerous national and international

    pieces of legislation. This has served to underscore the importance of belonging for all parties

    involved: both migrants (more or less welcome in their adoptive countries) and states alike. In a

    formal sense, the ultimate signal of unlimited acceptance remains the granting of citizenship by

    his/her new country to the “adoptee-resident.” Only citizens normally enjoy an unconditional right

    to live and reside without restrictions in a given country. Traditionally, this ultimate form of

    acceptance was (mutually) exclusive, which, for a long time, made it practically impossible for a

    person to be a citizen of more than one state. Gradual globalization and an unprecedented

    development of the very concept of citizenship, from a horizontal, national perspective to an

    emerging vertical, supra-national level (consider, for example, the concept of EU-citizenship and

    the special case of the Nordic states), required, at some point, a redefinition and re-evaluation of the

    concept of citizenship, in both formal legal and more informal terms. This paper examines this

    redefinition and re-evaluation within the context of Sweden.

  • 20.
    Dingu-Kyrklund, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Migration and Recognition of Diplomas in Sweden2005In: European Journal of Education, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 123-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trans-national migration is now a global phenomenon, affecting an increasing amount of persons, many of whom have already completed a form of higher education in their country of origin or earlier residence at the time of migration. There is consequently a need to evaluate foreign degrees and assess migrants’ professional competence beyond their initial borders. Recognition of diplomas against the background of the integration process is the core of this article. Combining considerations regarding migration and integration of highly educated international migrants on the labour market of their target countries with a closer perspective on the process of validation of foreign higher education and professional competence in Sweden, the article treats this topic as a European example of the development of an issue of increasing importance in years to come.

  • 21.
    Dingu-Kyrklund, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Nationality and the child: children’s right to citizenship - the Swedish case2004In: The 3rd European Conference on Nationality “Nationality and the Child” 11-12 October 2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The right to citizenship is an important right that every child should enjoy. In a general discussion on nationality, acquisition and loss of citizenship, the rights of the child against the background of extensive international migration, the article argues about the multiple aspects embedded in the citizenship concept and its practical content, presenting the legal status quo in the matter in the Swedish context.

  • 22.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mussino, Eleonora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Föräldraledig nu eller senare? Invandrade kvinnors användning av föräldrapenning2016In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, E-ISSN 2003-5624, Vol. 23, no 3-4, p. 259-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental leave now or later? Immigrant women’s use of parental leave benefit

    Sweden is a welfare state with a family policy that strongly emphasizes equality without distinction according to place of birth or gender. In this study, we investigate the di erences in uptake of parental leave between native and immigrant women, and the connection to labour-market attachment. Sweden represents a unique case study, not only because of the strong e ort to combine work and family for all women and men, the high level of fertility and the large presence of immigrants in the country; it also enables a detailed and sophisticated analysis based on the high-quality data derived from its population registers. We nd that immigrant mothers use more parental leave bene t the rst year after their child’s birth, but then fewer in the second year compared to native women. e di erences diminish when labour-market status is controlled for. Additionally, after some time in Sweden, immigrant mothers use leave more similarly to how native mothers do. We conclude that labour-market status is the most decisive factor for parental leave use and we point out the relationship between labour market and family policy. 

  • 23. Einhorn, Eric
    et al.
    Harbison, Sherrill
    Huss, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, German.
    Introduction2022In: Migration and Multiculturalism in Scandinavia / [ed] Eric Einhorn; Sherrill Harbison; Markus Huss, Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2022, , p. 368Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavian societies have historically, and problematically, been understood as homogeneous, when in fact they have a long history of ethnic and cultural pluralism due to colonialism and territorial conquest. After World War II, Sweden, Denmark, and Norway all became destinations for an increasingly diverse stream of migrants and asylum seekers from war-torn countries around the globe, culminating in the 2015-16 "refugee crisis." This multidisciplinary volume opens with an overview of how the three countries' current immigration policies developed and evolved, then expands to address how we might understand the current contexts and the social realities of immigration and diversity on the ground. Drawing from personal experiences and theoretical perspectives in such varied fields as sociology, political science, literature, and media studies, nineteen scholars assess recent shifts in Scandinavian societies and how they intertwine with broader transformations in Europe and beyond. Chapters explore a variety of topics, including themes of belonging and identity in Norway, the experiences and activism of the Nordic countries' Indigenous populations, and parallels between the racist far-right resurgence in Sweden and the United States. Contributors: Ellen A. Ahlness, Julie K. Allen, Grete Brochmann, Eric Einhorn, Sherrill Harbison, Anne Heith, Markus Huss, Peter Leonard, Barbara Mattsson, Kelly McKowen, Andreas Önnerfors, Elisabeth Oxfeldt, Tony Sandset, Carly Elizabeth Schall, Ryan Thomas Skinner, Admir Skodo, Benjamin R. Teitelbaum, Sayaka Osanami Törngren, Ethelene Whitmire.

  • 24. Einhorn, Eric
    et al.
    Harbison, SherrillHuss, MarkusStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, German.
    Migration and Multiculturalism in Scandinavia2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavian societies have historically, and problematically, been understood as homogeneous, when in fact they have a long history of ethnic and cultural pluralism due to colonialism and territorial conquest. After World War II, Sweden, Denmark, and Norway all became destinations for an increasingly diverse stream of migrants and asylum seekers from war-torn countries around the globe, culminating in the 2015-16 "refugee crisis." This multidisciplinary volume opens with an overview of how the three countries' current immigration policies developed and evolved, then expands to address how we might understand the current contexts and the social realities of immigration and diversity on the ground. Drawing from personal experiences and theoretical perspectives in such varied fields as sociology, political science, literature, and media studies, nineteen scholars assess recent shifts in Scandinavian societies and how they intertwine with broader transformations in Europe and beyond. Chapters explore a variety of topics, including themes of belonging and identity in Norway, the experiences and activism of the Nordic countries' Indigenous populations, and parallels between the racist far-right resurgence in Sweden and the United States. Contributors: Ellen A. Ahlness, Julie K. Allen, Grete Brochmann, Eric Einhorn, Sherrill Harbison, Anne Heith, Markus Huss, Peter Leonard, Barbara Mattsson, Kelly McKowen, Andreas Önnerfors, Elisabeth Oxfeldt, Tony Sandset, Carly Elizabeth Schall, Ryan Thomas Skinner, Admir Skodo, Benjamin R. Teitelbaum, Sayaka Osanami Törngren, Ethelene Whitmire.

  • 25.
    Ellefson, Merja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Governmentality and the Question of Origin - Pastoral Power and Processes of Inclusion and Exclusion2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to raise questions about possible links between nationalism, racism, Christian heritage and processes of inclusion and exclusion, and to explore the role of communication in these processes. I will first examine the problematic concepts of nation, state, nationalism, ethnie and race. My intention is to discuss different definitions and usages of these often-used concepts. A key aspect in the question of common ancestry is the nature-culture dichotomy, that is, to what extent the national character is the result of heredity (biology or nature), and to which extent it is molded by the social environment and upbringing (culture).Secondly, I will look into the different meanings of the adjective white and into the embodiments of whiteness. My intention is also to discuss the role of whiteness in the racial imagery and in the construction of normalcy. Does whiteness affect the formation of national identity and the ways Westerners are facing Otherness? What is the relationship between whiteness and pastoral power? Foucault speaks of the role of self-examination and consciousness-guidance. What about Augustine’s idea of natural hierachies? Are these aspects in turn linked to the rationality of state? Lastly, I will look into the role of visual communication, especially that of Christian iconography. To put it short, my focus will lie on the Foucauldian concept of governmentality, which I will try to develop further.

  • 26.
    Ellefson, Merja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    "We can hear each other's thoughts". Collective, governmentality and the question of origin2003In: Media Research in Progress: JMK Conference Contributions 2002, Stockholm: Stockholm University, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK) , 2003, p. 203-224Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss different definitions and usages of concepts of nation, state, nation state, race and ethnie. For example, race is generally agreed to be a social construction, but the Swedish word “ras” has stronger biological connotations than the English “race”. Racial discourses contain a complicated and changing relationship between nature and culture, which makes differentiation between “race” and “ethnie” a hair-splitting activity. The concepts of nation, state and nationalism have also proven difficult to define. Furthermore, there are no simple criteria defining Europe’s geographic or symbolic borders, since there has never been one Europe. For example, when Estonians or Poles say are pleased to be part of Europe again, what does it mean? Did they at some point stop being European? Or, does the word “European” only signify “member of EU”? Richard Dyer, in his book White (1997), asks if the white man really knows he is white. Dyer makes a distinction between white as color, skin color and symbol. The conflation of the different meanings of whiteness enables images of white supremacy and distinctions or ranking between different white ethnicities. Popular culture and media in general play an important role in discourses about origin, human nature, culture, in-groups and out-groups. Some whites are clearly whiter than other whites, just as some Swedes are more Swedish than other Swedes.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Simpson, Brent
    Editorial Decisions May Perpetuate Belief in Invalid Research Findings2013In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, article id e73364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social psychology and related disciplines are seeing a resurgence of interest in replication, as well as actual replication efforts. But prior work suggests that even a clear demonstration that a finding is invalid often fails to shake acceptance of the finding. This threatens the full impact of these replication efforts. Here we show that the actions of two key players journal editors and the authors of original (invalidated) research findings - are critical to the broader public's continued belief in an invalidated research conclusion. Across three experiments, we show that belief in an invalidated finding falls sharply when a critical failed replication is published in the same - versus different - journal as the original finding, and when the authors of the original finding acknowledge that the new findings invalidate their conclusions. We conclude by discussing policy implications of our key findings.

  • 28.
    Feiler, Yael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies. Teater- och dansvetenskap.
    Första generationen2008In: I&M: Invandrare & Minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, Vol. Årgång 35, no Nr 1 2008, p. 26-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Franzén, Elsie C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lära för Sverige: en studie av utbildningsproblem och arbetsmarknad för invandrare i grundutbildning för vuxna (grundvux)1990Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University.
    Hassanen, Sadia
    Multicultural Centre & Department of Cultural Anthropology, Stockholm University.
    Onward Migration of African Europeans:Comparing Attitudes to Migration Motives2014Report (Refereed)
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  • 31.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    Chihaya, Guilherme Kenji
    New immigration destinations in Sweden: Migrant residential trajectories intersecting rural areas2023In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to examine the residential trajectories of immigrants that intersect rural areas in Sweden. It adds to the literature on new immigration destinations (NIDs) and addresses the need to include migration routes intersecting rural areas, immigrants’ secondary migration patterns and temporal dimensions of migration, as well as the multiplicity of migrants in such destinations. We examine whether NIDs have emerged in Sweden and immigrants’ subsequent internal mobility from such areas and its determinants. Employing sequence analysis to full-population register data, we identify typical migration pathways. According to the results, NIDs are an emerging phenomenon in rural and small-sized cities in Sweden. We find limited support for the Swedish discourse that the diverse groups of rural migrants leave soon after arrival; also, those leaving are not doing so for labour market–related reasons, nor are they heading for metropolitan areas. We suggest that NIDs offer an important contribution to understanding migration patterns. 

  • 32.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kvinna, utrikes född och företagare – En heterogen grupp med olika behov2020In: Framtidens Chefer - Nyanlända och utrikes födda kvinnors entreprenörskap / [ed] Hedvig Heijne, Stockholm: Fores , 2020, p. 20-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on Haandrikman’s and Webster FORMAS funded project at Stockholm University examining migrant women’s entrepreneurship in Sweden. Based on register data statistical analysis and 40 economic life course interviews this chapter highlights the heterogeneity of migrant women’s entrepreneurship in Sweden. We argue that the diversity of women’s experience must be recognized and that policy supports and programs must reflect the range of entrepreneurial backgrounds, with an emphasis on the need for long-term supports.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 33.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Migrant, woman and business owner: A heterogeneous group with diverse needs2020Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines migrant women’s entrepreneurship based on statistical analysis of register data and analysis of 36 economic life course interviews with migrant women entrepreneurs. We highlight the heterogeneity of migrant women’s entrepreneurship in Sweden and argue that the diversity of women’s experiences must be recognized by supporting policies and that policy supports and programs must reflect the range of entrepreneurial backgrounds, emphasizing the need for long-term supports.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 34.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Dynamics of Absolute Value2002In: Annual Meeting of the Caribbean Studies Association: The Bahamas 27th, May 27–June 1st, 2002, CSA CD. ASOCIACIÓN DE ESTUDIOS DEL CARIBE, San Germán, Puerto Rico: CSA/Asociación de estudios del Caribe , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    E pluribus unum: Mauritian reflections2013In: Patterns: Make 'Em and Break 'Em / [ed] Lawson, Carol S., and Robert. F. Lawson, West Chester, Pa., USA: Chrysalis Reader/Swedenborg Foundation Press , 2013, 1, p. 74-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [fr]

    Histoire sommaire de la Nouvelle Église chrétienne en Maurice

  • 36.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Invandrarbarnens problem1976In: Svensk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-677X, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är vanligen den andra generationen av invandrarna som har de största svårigheterna att finna sig till rätta i samhället. Barnen kläms mellan föräldrarnas kultur och den i vilken de nu skall uppfostras, och segregationen fördjupar problematiken. Utbildningssystemet snarare än invandrarna måste anpassas och läggas om på internationell vetenskaplig grund där specialundervisning och flerspråkighet gynnas.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 37.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Kring böcker och människor: de gåtfulla barbarerna1979In: Nordisk Tidskrift för vetenskap, konst och industri, ISSN 0029-1501, p. 354-358Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Barbro Sætersdal's book Innvandrerne og barna deres (Oslo: Universitetsforl. 1978, ISBN 82-00-26512-9)

  • 38.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Momåla-Lönneberga-Dallas – Utvandrarsverige återspeglades i TV-smaken ett sekel senare: En inventering av populära TV-serier 1970-19851989In: Värld och vetande, ISSN 0346-4873, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 265-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analytical survey of popular TV series 1970-1985 and their impact in Swedish media based on inofficial statistics. 

  • 39.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Nelson Mandela and the rainbow culture2004In: Peace in a restless world / [ed] Swami Shantananda, Piercy, CA: Chinmaya Publications , 2004, p. 116-120Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Nelson Mandela and the Rainbow of Culture2003In: The Star, no 17 JulyArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special feature issue of the Johannesburg Star, the country's largest-circulation daily paper.

  • 41.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Nordens huvudstad: svenska andar i det metafysiska Petersburg1999In: Parnass, ISSN 1104-0548, no 3, p. 34-35Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Review of Dmitrij Spivak's book Severnaya stolitsa: metafizika Peterburga (“The northern capital—the metaphysical Petersburg”; Sankt-Peterburg: TEMA, 1998), with a special focus on its second and most comprehensive part (Shvedskie korni, "Swedish roots"), and of Bengt Jangfeldt's Svenska vägar till S:t Petersburg (Stockholm 1998), supplemented by notes on other works in the same field and finally counterpoised by a note on my family's Russian background.

  • 42.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Race and Caste: Subjugation, Serfdom, Slavery1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Hassanen, Sadia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Woldu, Dawit Okubatsion
    Mkuu, Rahma
    The effects of migration on the practice and perception Female Genital Cutting (FGC) among the Horn of Africa's immigrants in Melbourne Australia2019In: AIMS public health, ISSN 2327-8994, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the effects of migration on the practice and perception of Female Genital Mutilation or Cutting (FGM/C) among Horn of Africa immigrants in Melbourne Australia. According to UN 2016 report, on (FGM/C), there are at least 200 million girls and women alive today globally that have undergone some of form of FGM/C. The same report highlights that most of these practices are concentrated in parts of Africa, Middle East and South Asia. Our research employed in-depth semi-structured interviews with 50 men and women informants and five focus groups among the Horn of Africa immigrants living in Melbourne Australia. Interview and focus group data were analysed using MAXQUDA text analysis software to see emerging themes from the data. Upon the examination of the interviews and focus group data, we found that gender and immigration were the two factors that influenced immigrant's perception about FGC. Understanding the social and cultural dynamics on the perception of FGC among immigrant communities in the West could help in devising appropriate interventions to tackle FGC in several groups where this practice is commonly occurring.

  • 44.
    Hedberg, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Disadvantage, Ethnic Niching or Pursuit of a Vision? Motives of Immigrant Women Care Entrepreneurs in the Ageing Swedish Society2012In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 423-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As immigrant groups grow older, host societies are faced with new challenges of integration. In a labor market that is structured by ethnicity and gender, the demand for culturally competent care provides immigrant women with the opportunity to become entrepreneurs within the care sector. This article analyzes 20 in-depth interviews with immigrant women from 13 countries who are entrepreneurs in home-help services for elderly people. The article analyzes the complex motives behind the women’s entrepreneurship. Ethnic entrepreneurship has mainly been approached as a way for immigrants to survive in the labor market—the disadvantage theory—or as a means to create job opportunities for co-ethnics within ethnic economies. Opposed to this, three main motives appear in the analysis: first, the processes of ethnic and gender sorting in the care sector; second, ethnic strategies in the labor market; and third, the wish to gain independence and improve the quality of care. Only in a few cases is ethnic entrepreneurship practiced within ethnic economies; instead, it is mainly found within cross-cultural economies, consisting of employees and customers of mixed origin who are embedded in a majority society. The women construct their ethnic identities to compete in the segmented Swedish labor market by creating ethnic identities of care that are adjusted to meet the needs of their customers in a cross-cultural society.

  • 45.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, Stockholm Centre for the Rights of the Child.
    Ensam på flykt – och ifrågasatt av Sverige2016In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000, no 27 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Ensamkommande barn och ungdomar: En introduktion till samhällskontext, forskning och ramverk2018Book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Multidisciplinary Research on Religion and Society (CRS Uppsala), Sweden.
    Exploring the ‘Integrative Turn’ in Child Politics and Law2022In: The Global Meeting on Law and Society, Annual conference arranged by the Law & Society Association, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, the concept of integration has primarily been connected to labor market participation. However, in later decades, there has been a shift in political discourse, where persons with migration experience are expected – or demanded – to ’integrate’ socially and culturally in ways that rather reminds of assimilation, i.e. the eradication of difference. Children and youth are in the focus of many of these policies. This has meant a sharp increase in the number of regulations in several policy areas, such as education, child welfare and criminal law.

    Sweden has been described in the sociological literature as part of a ‘Nordic Model’ striving for social equity, and to some extent, the inclusion of new arrivals and persons with migration experience. However, the Swedish welfare state has been structurally transformed during the last 30 years, combined with a steady growth of regulations aiming to integrate children and youth.

    The aim of this paper is to present preliminary findings about the trajectory of this ‘integrative turn’ in child politics and law, a turn that can be traced back to 1990s, a decade during which two parallel and sometimes-contradictory policy tracks were established. One was grounded in debates about gender equality and honour-related violence, while the other originated in expressed political strives to acknowledge Sweden as a multi-cultural society. The analysis draws on traditional legal sources such as legal text, court verdicts, preparatory work and legal scholarship to establish a timeline for the ‘integrative turn’ while simultaneously using text analysis to examine shifts in law and policy. Theoretically, the analysis highlights questions about the relationship between law and emotion, applying concepts such as abject (disgust), love (care/protection) and rage (as resistance to assimilation and an engine of progressive politics). Thereby, this paper goes into dialogue with the field of law and emotion.

     

  • 48.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, Stockholm Centre for the Rights of the Child.
    Företrädd på lika villkor? Perspektiv på godmanskapsinstitutet för ensamkommande barn2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, Stockholm Centre for the Rights of the Child.
    Är du trovärdig, lille vän?2015In: Artikel 14: informationsblad från Flyktinggruppernas och asylkommittéernas riksråd, ISSN 1104-1846, no 4, p. 42-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Salmonsson, Lisa
    Challenges in the Guardianship of Unaccompanied Minors Seeking Asylum2018In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 489-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the research literature relating to the guardianship of unaccompanied minors seeking asylum. In particular, we seek to find out what type of dilemmas have been identified by research concerning the guardianship of unaccompanied minors, and the focus that the literature has therefore taken. A comprehensive search of identified databases was conducted. Ultimately, 38 publications were selected for analysis. The review was qualitative and inductive. The results of the review suggest that research has identified and focused on challenges in the form of diverging policy such as gaps and inconsistencies in guardianship institutions, as well as challenges in balancing different objectives concerning the guardianship role, such as conflicting interest in the guardianship assignment or between different actors involved in protecting the child’s interest.The conclusion is that different configurations of guardianship institutions, as well as the identified challenges for practice, appear to be related to the welfare state model. Therefore, future research concerning guardianship for unaccompanied minors needs to move beyond legal sources and policy documents by focusing on empirically informed research on the relationship between child care/protection, principles of assessing the best interest of the child and the welfare state systems.

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