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  • 1. Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400–550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The ‘efficient trauma’ distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 2.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Review of: Ann Garrison Darrin & Beth Laura O'Leary, (Eds), 2009, Handbook of Space engineering, Archaeology, and Heritage. Boca Raton: CRC Press.2011In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 14, no 1-2, p. 271-273Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Spatial and Temporal Trends in New Cases of Men with Modified Teeth from Sweden (AD 750 to 1100)2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vikings with artificially modified teeth have previously been documented in the south-eastern parts ofScandinavia and in England. In a project dealing with life in the Mälaren Valley in Sweden duringthe period AD 750–1100, new cases of people with modified maxillary teeth were observed. Thehypothesis that the practice was entirely associated with adult men dating to the Viking Age was tested.The new cases demonstrate that the habit extended to eastern-central Sweden, including the proto-townof Birka, perhaps as early as in the middle of the eighth century. Additionally, cases from Sigtuna showthat the practice may have ended as late as the beginning of the twelfth century. A microanalysis, usinga scanning electron microscope, showed the heterogeneous character of the modifications. The affectedindividuals were all adult men, similar to previously published cases. Some of the men are associatedwith weapons and violent acts and the cases from Sigtuna were all from cemeteries with a possibleassociation with lower social strata. However, discrepancies in archaeological contexts and in the charac-teristics of the modifications suggest temporal and spatial variation in the social meaning of themodifications.

  • 4.
    Klevnäs, Alison Margaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    ‘Imbued with the Essence of the Owner’: Personhood and Possessions in the Reopening and Reworking of Viking-Age Burials2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 456-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the wide range of grave disturbance practices seen in Viking-age burials across Scandinavia. It argues that the much-debated reopenings at high-profile sites, notably the Norwegian royal' mounds, should be seen against a background of widespread and varied evidence for burial reworking in Scandinavia throughout the first-millennium ad and into the Middle Ages. Interventions into Viking-age graves are interpreted as disruptive, intended to derail practices of memory-creation set in motion by funerary displays and monuments. However, the reopening and reworking of burials were also mnemonic citations in their own right, using a recurrent set of practices to make heroic, mythological, and genealogical allusions. The retrieval of portable artefacts was a key element in this repertoire, and in this article I use archaeological and written sources to explore the particular concepts of ownership which enabled certain possessions to work as material citations appropriating attributes of dead persons for living claimants.

  • 5.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ocriculum (Otricoli, Umbria): An Archaeological Survey of the Roman Town2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 745-748Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6. Äikäs, Tiina
    et al.
    Spangen, Marte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    New Users and Changing Traditions—(Re)Defining Sami Offering Sites2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 95-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sami are indigenous people of Northern Fennoscandia. Some Sami offering sites have been used for over a thousand years. During this time, the offering traditions have changed and various people have started using the places based on different motivations. Present day archaeological finds give evidence of both continuing traditions and new meanings attached to these sites, as well as to sites that were probably not originally used for rituals in the Sami ethnic religion. In some cases, the authenticity of the place seems to lie in the stories and current beliefs more than in a historical continuity or any specifically sacred aspects of the topography or nature it is situated in. Today's new users include, for example, local (Sami) people, tourists, and neo-pagans. This paper discusses what informs these users, what identifies certain locations as offering sites, and what current users believe their relationship to these places should be. What roles do scholarly traditions, heritage tourism, and internal culture have in (re)defining Sami offering sites and similarly what roles do ‘appropriate’ rituals have in ascribing meaning to particular places? How do we mediate wishes for multivocality with our professional opinions when it comes to defining sacredness?

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