Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alfredsson Ågren, Kristin
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Digital participation? Internet use among adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities: A comparative study2019In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet use is an integrated part of everyday life, especially among young people. However, knowledge of this for young people with disabilities is scarce. This study investigates digital participation of adolescents with intellectual disabilities by comparing aspects of Internet use among adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities. Cross-sectional comparative design was used and a national survey from the Swedish Media Council was cognitively adapted for adolescents with intellectual disabilities aged 13-20 years. The results reveal that a significantly lower proportion of the 114 participating adolescents with intellectual disabilities had access to Internet-enabled devices and performed Internet activities, except for playing games, than the reference group (n = 1161). The greatest difference was found in searching for information. Analyses indicate that adolescents with intellectual disabilities are following a similar pattern of Internet use as the reference group, but a digital lag is prevalent, and a more cognitively accessible web could be beneficial.

  • 2.
    Andén-Papadopoulos, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Citizen camera-witnessing: Embodied political dissent in the age of 'mediated mass self-communication'2014In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 753-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article interrogates the emerging modes of civic engagement connected to the mobile camera-phone, and the ways in which they require us to rethink what it is to bear witness to brutality in the age of fundamentally camera-mediated mass self-publication. I argue that the camera-phone permits entirely new performative rituals of bearing witness, such as dissenting bodies en masse recording their own repression and, via wireless global communication networks, effectively mobilizing this footage as graphic testimony in a bid to produce feelings of political solidarity. Critically, the performance of what I elect to call citizen camera-witnessing', as exemplified by contemporary street opposition movements including those in Burma, Iran, Egypt, Libya and Syria, derives its potency from the ways it reactivates the idea of martyrdom: that is, from its distinct claim to truth in the name of afflicted people who put their bodies on the line to record the injustice of oppression.

  • 3.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Jansson, André
    Complicit surveillance, interveillance, and the question of cosmopolitanism: Toward a phenomenological understanding of mediatization2015In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1473-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The institutional and meta-processual dimensions of surveillance have been scrutinized extensively in literature. In these accounts, the subjective, individual level has often been invoked in relation to subject-object, surveillor-surveilled dualities and in terms of the kinds of subjectivity modern and late-modern institutions engender. The experiential, ontological realm of the mediatized everyday vis-a-vis surveillance remains less explored, particularly from the phenomenological perspective of the lifeworld. Academic discourses of surveillance mostly address rhetorically oriented macro-perspectives. The same diagnosis largely applies to the debates on the cosmopolitanization process. The literature of cosmopolitanism revolves around broad cultural and ethical transformations in terms of the relationship between Self and Other, individual and humanity, and the local and the universal. Our aim in this article is to conceptualize the dynamics that yield a cosmopolitan Self and an encapsulated Self under conditions of increasingly interactive and ubiquitous forms of mediation and surveillance.

  • 4.
    Lagerkvist, Amanda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Existential Media: Toward a Theorization of Digital Thrownness2017In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 96-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our digitally enforced lifeworld is an existential and ambivalent terrain. Questions concerning digital technologies are thus questions about human existence. This theoretical essay employs key concepts from existential philosophy to envision an existential media analysis that accounts for the thrownness of digital human existence. Tracing our digital thrownness to four emergent fields of inquiry, that relate to classic themes (death, time, being there, and being-in-and-with-the-world), it encircles both mundane connectivity and the extraordinary limit-situations (online) when our human vulnerability is principally felt and our security is shaken. In place of a savvy user, this article posits the “exister” as the principal subject in media studies and inhabitant of the digital ecology—a stumbling, hurting, and relational human being, who navigates within limits and among interruptions through the torrents of our digital existence, in search for meaning and existential security.

  • 5.
    Rahm-Skågeby, Jörgen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Carlsson, Anders
    The archive and the scene: on the cultural techniques of retrocomputing databases2019In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several digital spaces are now archiving artifacts from the first 1980s home computer boom. These spaces are not only storages, but also social venues and ‘memory banks’, and thereby depend on several concurrent practices: software and hardware developed to read, run, and preserve computer code; archiving of old software, magazines, and personal stories; contemporary conferences dedicated to retrocomputing; and making artifacts, which used to be private, publically available. The paper argues that retrocomputing can be seen as a foreshadowing in terms of managing collective digital archives, memories, and relationships to digital material. Taking the Commodore 64 Scene Database as a case, this paper 1) engages with both users and cultural techniques, in order to 2) theorize collective digital archives as ‘performative in-betweens’, and 3) discuss how retrocomputing may become a default mode for people seeking access to their digital pasts in a time when planned obsolescence is rampant.

  • 6.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Franzén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Contested connectedness in child custody narratives: Mobile phones and children's rights and responsibilities2018In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 3818-3835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New forms of information and communications technology (ICT) form parts of contemporary communication. At large, connected presence (e.g. through mobile phones) is seen as something positive that facilitates social connectedness in family life. Yet, there are also instances of what we call contested connectedness. This article analyses courtroom proceedings in child custody disputes. The analyses (from 68 audio-recorded high-conflict trials) highlight how mobile phone connectedness reshapes boundaries of public/private in post-separation family life. A number of cases were chosen to illuminate different ways in which connectedness through mobile phone contacts was contested by the child or one of the parents. Three cases document recurring ways in which children's rights and responsibilities were intertwined in complex ways in post-divorce life and how mobile phone connectedness would not offer the child new rights, yet make them more responsible for monitoring their parents' unresolved problems.

  • 7.
    Westerlund, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    The production of pro-suicide content on the Internet: A counter-discourse activity2012In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 764-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pro-suicide websites are topping search engine result lists, raising fears about the internet's detrimental influence on behaviour and attitudes related to suicide. Based on a qualitative analysis, this article argues that the production of pro-suicide content on the internet should be seen as a counter-discourse, directed against socially dominant perceptions of suicide. On pro-suicide websites, the description of technical, chemical and anatomic details, the expression of honourable and clearly individualistic ideals, the depictions of morbid bodily violence, together with the absence of emotional content could all be said to represent a kind of constructed Western masculinity. Furthermore, because of its potential for identity gain and the acting out of aggressive impulses, it is crucial - although this may seem somewhat paradoxical - to understand the production of the pro-suicide content as a manifestation of what is, for the participants, a meaningful practice.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf