Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arnell, Matilda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Eriksson, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Ehrlén, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Reproductive success, fruit removal and local distribution patterns in the early-flowering shrub Daphne mezereum2023In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, no 10, article id e03871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In insect-pollinated, bird-dispersed plants, both investment in reproduction and reproductive success involve interactions between plants and their pollinators and dispersers. The outcome of these plant–animal interactions may be affected by the number of flowers and fruits, as well as by the plants' local environment and by spatial associations among plants. In this study we mapped the spatial distribution of individuals in a population of the early flowering, fleshy-fruited shrub Daphne mezereum, in a forest in boreo-nemoral Sweden. For all mapped individuals we collected data on numbers of flowers and fruits and fruit removal, for three consecutive years. We analysed spatial associations among individuals, and the effects on reproductive performance and fruit removal of plant height, numbers of flowers and fruits, distance to forest edge, and neighbouring flower and fruit density. Our results show that the density of D. mezereum increases with increasing proximity to forest edge. The number of flowers produced, as well as fruit set and fruit removal, show the same positive relationship with increasing proximity to forest edges. We further show that individuals are aggregated up to distances of about 10 m. The flower production of neighbouring conspecific individuals within 10 m is negatively related to fruit set whereas the fruit production of neighbours is positively related to fruit removal. Our main conclusion is that the spatial distribution of D. mezereum affects reproductive success and fruit removal, which in turn has the potential to feed back to the spatial distribution pattern. Combining studies of reproduction with spatial analyses is important to advance our understanding of the dynamics of plant populations. 

  • 2.
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Mattsson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Land use history and site location are more important for grassland species richness than local soil properties2009In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 27, p. 483-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately there has been a shift in Sweden from grazing species-rich semi-natural grasslands towards grazing ex-arable fields in the modern agricultural landscape. Grazing ex-arable fields contain a fraction of the plant species richness confined to semi-natural grasslands. Still, they have been suggested as potential target sites for re-creation of semi-natural grasslands. We asked to what extent does fine-scale variation in soil conditions, management history and site location effect local plant diversity in grazed ex-arable fields. We examined local soil conditions such as texture, pH, organic carbon, nitrogen (N) and extractable phosphate (P) and effects on plant richness in ten pairs of grazed ex-fields and neighbouring semi-natural grasslands in different rural landscapes. Each grassland pair where in the same paddock. A multivariate test showed that site location and land use history explained more of differences in species richness than local soil property variables. Plant species richness was positively associated to grazed ex-fields with low pH, low N and P levels. Sites with high plant richness in semi-natural grasslands also had more species in the adjacent grazed ex-fields, compared to sites neighbouring less species-rich semi-natural grasslands. Although both soil properties and species richness were different in grazed ex-fields compared to semi-natural grassland, the site location within a landscape, and vicinity to species-rich grasslands, can override effects of soil properties. In conclusion, if properly located, ex-arable fields may be an important habitat to maintain plant diversity at larger spatio-temporal scales and should considered as potential sites for grassland restoration.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    The power of observation: Eugen Warming (1918) Om Jordudløbere (‘Underground runners') and the ecology and evolution of clonal plants2023In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 2023, no 7, article id e04003Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although often overlooked, the Danish botanist Eugen Warming was one the founders of ecology as a science. He also wrote extensively on plant life forms, including an essay from 1918, Om Jordudløbere (‘Underground runners'), which specifically focused on clonal plants. As was common among naturalists during the 19th century, Warming was exceptionally skillful in drawing conclusions from plain observation. The present paper examines how Warming understood and interpreted the ecology and evolution of clonal plants, and compares his insights with those emanating during the revival of research on clonal plants from the late 1970s onward. Several of the key topics in this revival were treated already by Warming, particularly clonal plants' ability of mobility by horizontal growth, the features affecting the ‘splitting' of genets into independent ramets, and how clonal life forms evolve. Despite these thematic similarities, Warming's direct impact on later research was limited, with the possible exception of the concept of plant functional types. This does not preclude that Warming's insights have bearing on the current research agenda on the ecology and evolution of clonal plants. The paper ends with a brief discussion of horizontal growth as a means to extend genet lifespan, thereby providing a basis for evolution of clonal plant life form through processes acting within genets. 

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Ove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Glav Lundin, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Legacies of historic charcoal production affect the forest flora in a Swedish mining district2021In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 39, no 11, article id e03312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iron production was historically associated with major impacts on forests worldwide, as vast amounts of wood were harvested to produce the charcoal needed for heating the furnaces and reducing iron oxides in the ore to iron. This impact has left abundant legacies which potentially may remain in the present-day vegetation. We investigated how remains of historic charcoal production, mainly from the 18th to the early 20th century, at still remaining charcoal kiln platforms (CKPs), affect the current species richness, species occurrences and cover of vascular plants in the ground vegetation in a Swedish mining district located in the boreo-nemoral forest zone. CKPs have a significantly higher species richness than the surrounding forest, and they also affect cover (negatively) for ericaceous species typically dominating the forest ground vegetation. Several forest species are more frequent at CKPs, and these also harbor significantly more uncommon species, of which many are typical for traditionally managed grasslands. These latter species are likely to represent remnants in present-day forests reflecting former land-use such as livestock grazing. The soil chemistry at CKPs is strongly deviating from the surrounding forest, and this, together with a lower cover of ericaceous shrubs, are the most likely mechanisms behind the higher species richness. CKPs represent conspicuous and abundant historic anthropogenic habitats in the forest vegetation. As far as we are aware, the flora at CKPs in boreal and boreo-nemoral forests has not previously been investigated in detail, and they deserve more attention, both from a biological and a cultural–historical perspective. 

  • 5.
    Glav Lundin, Linnea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    The decline of Gentianella campestris: three decades of population development of an endangered grassland plant in Sweden2021In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 39, no 3, article id e03007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species-rich semi-natural grasslands are declining all over northern Europe, and many plant species confined to such grasslands are currently under threat. We studied the development of populations of one such species, the field gentian Gentianella campestris, during three decades in the County of Södermanland, south of Stockholm, Sweden. Gentianella campestris is Red Listed as Endangered in Sweden. It is a strict biennial, and as far as known with only a transient seed bank. Large population fluctuations are a characteristic of this species, and its life history makes the species inherently sensitive to factors causing population reductions. We found that the number of sites with G. campestris has declined with over 60% in the last three decades. The total number of flowering individuals also show a strong decreasing trend, although there was an increase the last year (2020) at a few remaining sites. Cessation of grazing management is a major cause of the decline, but populations also disappeared from managed sites. It is possible that the management has been inappropriate, and circumstantial evidence suggests that summer drought might be an additional cause of population decline. Data from 2018, a year with an exceptional summer drought, supports this explanation. A sowing experiment indicated that recruitment of new populations is unlikely in the present-day landscape where most vegetation is unsuitable for G. campestris. Due to the poor prospects for long-term maintenance of grazing management in still remaining semi-natural grasslands, and the decline even at sites with current management, G. campestris faces a risk of becoming regionally extinct within the coming decades.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Veronika A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Mueller, Gregor
    Eriksson, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Dust seed production and dispersal in Swedish Pyroleae species2014In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 209-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dust seeds are the smallest seeds in angiosperms weighing just about a few micrograms. These seeds are characteristic of most orchids, and several studies have been performed on seed features, fecundity and dispersal of orchid dust seeds. In this study we examine seed features, seed production and seed dispersal in another plant group with dust seeds, the Pyroleae (Monotropoideae, Ericaceae), focusing on six species: Pyrola chlorantha, P. minor, P. rotundifolia, Chimaphila umbellata, Moneses uniflora and Orthilia secunda. Seed production per capsule among these species was in the range between ca 1000 and 7800, and seed production per capsule bearing shoot was in the range between ca 7000 and 60 000. Combining our results with published information on pollen-ovule ratios suggests that these Pyroleae species have a generally efficient pollination system. The most fecund species was P. minor, the only species among the investigated that is probably largely self-pollinating. The investigated Pyroleae species have a seed production comparable to the less fecund orchid species. We studied seed dispersal in the field in one of the species, P. chlorantha. Despite the extremely small and potentially buoyant seeds, the vast majority of seeds are deposited close to the seed source, within a few meters. Further studies on the recruitment ecology of the investigated Pyroleae species are currently under way.

  • 7.
    Kapás, Rozália E.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Kimberley, Adam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Grassland species colonization of a restored grassland on a former forest varies in short-term success but is facilitated by greater functional connectivity2024In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 2024, no 4, article id e03762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, restoration on former grassland sites has been widely encouraged globally, aiming to address the historical loss of 90% of ancient species-rich grasslands, and to mitigate the associated threat to grassland biodiversity. The objective of our study was to investigate on a small-scale how plant species spontaneously colonize restored grasslands. We inventoried 275 permanent plots twice (in 2019 and 2021) in a restored grassland, following the removal of a conifer plantation. Species richness and vegetation cover in surveyed plots were dependent on grazing activity and distance to adjacent grassland. Plant species associated with forest habitats declined, while the occurrence of generalist species together with a few grassland specialists generally increased. However, not all grassland specialists gained occurrence and the colonization pattern was not consistent over time, possibly due to the lack of continuous seed arrival and low livestock activity and hence lack of disturbance. These results suggest that successful colonization of plant species benefits from links to species-rich sites adjacent to the restoration target, with spatial dispersal and improved conditions for species establishment being key to species occurrence. Both dispersal and establishment potential are likely facilitated through the presence of grazing livestock with access to both species-rich grasslands and restoration targets. However, the shift towards a more typical grassland community takes place gradually, with vulnerable populations of early colonizing grassland species prone to local extinction in short-term. As a result, continued functional connectivity provided by grazing animals is necessary to improve the diversity of the restored site and ensure the establishment of grassland specialists and to maintain the plant community composition.

  • 8.
    Mouly, Arnaud
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Puff, Christian
    Paederia ntiti sp nov (Rubiaceae) from the Comoros and notes on the affinities of Comorian rubiaceous climbers and lianas2010In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new species of Paederia L. (Rubiaceae, Rubioideae, Paederieae), P. ntiti Mouly & Puff, endemic to the Comoros (Grande Comore, Anjouan and Mayotte) and occurring in natural elevated forests is described and illustrated. Its conservation status is evaluated and the species is rated 'Endangered' (EN). A key to the Paederia taxa of the Comorian archipelago is provided. Also included are notes on the three other species of rubiaceous climbers and lianas known from the Comoros: Paederia bojeriana (A. Rich. ex DC.) Drake, Danais comorensis Drake and Uncaria africana G. Don.

  • 9. Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Beier, Bjorn-Axel
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Banks, Hannah I.
    Ambilobea, a new genus from Madagascar, the position of Aucoumea, and comments on the tribal classification of the frankincense and myrrh family (Burseraceae)2008In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 26, no 04-mar, p. 218-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phylogenetic analyses of 46 species, representing all tribes and 14 out of 18 recognized genera of Burseraceae, are performed using nuclear ETS and plastid rps16 sequences. Boswellia madagascariensis, the only Malagasy species of this genus, is shown to belong to a clade comprising all sampled members of the current tribe Canarieae plus Triomma, whereas other species of Boswellia (including the type, B. serrata) form a clade that is strongly supported as sister to Garuga. A new genus, Ambilobea, is proposed for B. madagascariensis and the new combination A. madagascariensis is made. Ambilobea differs from Boswellia s. s. by being dioecious and by having valvate petals and, furthermore, is unique in the family by its winged tips to the petioles, by having pyrenes that remain attached to the detached valves of the fruit at dehiscence, and by its long-spinose pollen grains. Aucoumea, a monotypic central African rain forest genus, is strongly supported as sister to a clade with the arid-adapted Bursera and Commiphora. Boswellia s. s. and Garuga form a clade characterized by having hermaphroditic flowers. The relationships within Burseraceae emerging from this and previous phylogenetic studies are, on several points, in conflict with current tribal delimitation. The following suggestions for a new tribal classification of Burseraceae are made: 1) Beiselia, sister to the rest of the family, needs to be placed in a tribe of its own, Beiselieae, trib. nov., 2) Protieae should be restricted to Crepidospermum, Protium and Tetragastris, although generic rearrangements seem to be needed within this tribe, 3) Bursereae should be restricted to Aucoumea, Bursera and Commiphora, but generic rearrangements are needed in the Bursera-Commiphora complex, 4) the remaining genera, Ambilobea, Boswellia, Canarium, Dacryodes, Garuga, Haplolobus, Pseudodacryodes, Rosselia, Santiria, Scutinanthe, Trattinnickia and Triomma, are probably best placed in a broadly circumscribed Garugeae.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf