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  • 1.
    Christensen, Miyase
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    New Media Geographies and the Middle East2013In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 267-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Television & New Media brings together current research on media technologies, society, and culture in the Middle East from diverse methodological and analytical perspectives. The topics addressed cover a wide spectrum: circulation of Arab music videos and public discourse; Lebanese bloggers and mediated public spheres; transnational television audiences and ontological security; social media, TV talk shows, and political change in Egypt; youth-generated Arab media and cultural politics; and the Arab Spring as an ephemeral communicative space. Together, the articles provide a panorama of how today's multimodal media geographies and engaged actors reinscribe public cultures and politics in the Middle East.

  • 2.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Arab Spring As Meta-Event and Communicative Spaces2013In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 351-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, immediately labeled the Arab Spring, are best described as processes rather than outcomes. Despite being a common area of media focus due to decades-long geopolitics, the Arab Spring, as a mediatized meta-event, has led to the reemergence of the region as a discursive territory. The communicative spaces that opened up during and in the aftermath of the uprisings allowed for a multiplicity of topics to reenter public discourse across local, national, and transnational scales. In the process, seasoned debates such as religious sectarianism and democratic institutionalization gained magnitude. More specific debates such as Turkey's role as a model/antimodel added new discursive aspects to the multitopic ensemble. The purpose of this article is to reflect on the communicative and scalar dimensions in the mediation of the Arab Spring by way of taking the debates on Turkey as a case in point.

  • 3. Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete
    et al.
    Hellman, Heikke
    Riegert, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Cultural Mediators Seduced by Mad Men: How Cultural Journalists Legitimized a Quality TV Series in the Nordic Region2019In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 257-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on theories about the role of cultural mediators in cultural production and using the TV series Mad Men as a case, this article investigates how cultural journalists in the Nordic countries have contributed to legitimizing “quality TV series” as a worthy field of aesthetic consumption. Key analytical points are as follows: (1) cultural journalists legitimize Mad Men’s quality by addressing aspects internal (aesthetic markers) and aspects external (culture industry markers) to the series, as well as the series’ broader social and historical anchoring; (2) Nordic cultural journalists position themselves positively toward the TV series based on their professional expertise and their personal taste preferences and predilections; (3) these legitimation processes take place across journalistic genres, pointing to the importance not only of TV criticism, epitomized by the review, but of cultural journalism more broadly in constructing affirmative attitudes toward popular culture phenomena such as TV series.

  • 4.
    Riegert, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Ramsay, Gail
    Activists, Individualists, and Comics: The Counter-publicness of Lebanese Blogs2013In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 286-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines whether the ways Lebanese bloggers blur the boundaries between the national and transnational, the formal and informal, and entertainment and politics can be described as counter-publics. We focus on the ten most popular individual blogs in Lebanon during the time period April 2009-2010, noting bloggers' mutual connectivity and links to online media in Lebanon. We then analyze themes common to these blogs, focusing specifically on how Lebanese bloggers question the norms and push the boundaries of what can be said mediated public sphere. While there are differences between the bloggers not least due to whether they are writing in Arabic or English-almost all explicitly criticize the current sectarian system, human rights violations, as well as existing religious, gender and environmental norms. Whether they see themselves as cosmopolitan or locally based activists, a significant minority uses humor and political satire as key elements in their blogs.

  • 5.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Politics of Content Aggregation2014In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the streaming of online video, along a line of comparison to the music industry. Based on qualitative empirical research conducted in Sweden and other European countries, the article focuses on one particular aspect of streamed media, aggregation, since aggregation is central for how streaming is economically, technically, and socially organized. Developing its argument at the intersection of critical media industry studies and economic anthropology, the article argues that online aggregators have contributed to a process of devaluation that their services were designed to fight.

  • 6.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Spotify Effect: Digital Distribution and Financial Growth2019In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 3-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes Spotify as a media company that operates at the intersection of advertising, technology, music, and finance. In doing so, this article contributes to media industry studies as a field that investigates the relation between various industrial and economic actors. Given that the media industries, as any other industry, can be defined as a set of markets, one of which is the leading market, and to which other markets are auxiliary, the question asked is what market is leading in the case of Spotify. What the article describes as the Spotify effect is the company's ability to fold markets into each other: to make disappear an aggressive financial growth strategy and business set-up based on ad tech engineering by creating an aura of Nordic cool and public benefit around its use of music. Spotify's financial strategy has implications for the digital distribution of cultural content more generally.

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