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  • 1.
    Calissendorff, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Student music teachers' learning styles in theoretical and practical situations2015In: International Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0255-7614, E-ISSN 1744-795X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 348-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes and compares the results of a survey and an interview investigation concerning the learning styles of 32 student music teachers at The University College of Music Education (SMI) in Sweden. The students' learning style preferences were examined through a productivity environmental preference survey (PEPS), a computer-based survey that is based on the Dunn and Dunn Learning Style Model. The students who completed the survey expressed a difference between learning something that was theoretically new and difficult and something that was new and difficult related to their instrument/singing. The surveys were then followed up by semi-structured interviews with 31 of the 32 students. The study found that there is only a minimal difference between practice and theoretical learning regarding the learning styles of student music teachers. The students' procedure in theoretical learning was, as far as possible, the same as for practical learning, and it is the more practical and physical details that present obstacles. The practical relevance of the research is that it raises awareness for students regarding their learning styles and how they can streamline both their own learning and that of their future pupils.

  • 2. Parkes, Kelly
    et al.
    Daniel, Ryan
    West, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gaunt, Helena
    Applied music studio teachers in higher education: exploring the impact of identification and talent on career satisfaction2015In: International Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0255-7614, E-ISSN 1744-795X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 372-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore how highly trained performing musicians, currently working in higher education conservatoires or universities, understand, categorize, and reflect on their identification as a studio music teacher. Using an online survey involving participants (N = 173) across nine western countries, respondents identified how they saw themselves, as performer, teacher, or both. Quantitative items illustrated their beliefs in regard to talent (self-concept) and identification with two domains (teaching and performing), as well as levels of satisfaction in both roles. Results showed that participants held two identities as both teachers and performers, that they felt slightly more talented at teaching, and that they were more satisfied with performing than with teaching. Using regression, the authors documented that identification with being a teacher predicted 41% of the variance in whether studio teachers were satisfied with being a teacher. Performing talent predicted 26% of their satisfaction with being a performer. The findings are significant to music educators because they demonstrate the complexities associated with the interplay between identification with teaching and with performing. Institutional leaders who recruit and employ advanced musicians to teach in the studio should explore this interplay or balance and, where appropriate, put in place mechanisms to support individuals as they navigate through these domains.

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