Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Barman, Linda
    et al.
    Silén, Charlotte
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Outcome based education enacted: teachers' tensions in balancing between student learning and bureaucracy2014In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 629-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on how teachers within health sciences education translate outcome-based education (OBE) into practice when they design courses. The study is an empirical contribution to the debate about outcome- and competency-based approaches in health sciences education. A qualitative method was used to study how teachers from 14 different study programmes designed courses before and after OBE was implemented. Using an interpretative approach, analysis of documents and interviews was carried out. The findings show that teachers enacted OBE either to design for more competency-oriented teaching-learning, or to further detail knowledge and thus move towards reductionism. Teachers mainly understood the outcome-based framework as useful to support students' learning, although the demand for accountability created tension and became a bureaucratic hindrance to design for development of professional competence. The paper shows variations of how teachers enacted the same outcome-based framework for instructional design. These differences can add a richer understanding of how outcome- or competency-based approaches relate to teaching-learning at a course level.

  • 2.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lonka, Kirsti
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Josephson, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    How do medical teachers address the problem of transfer?2008In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 345-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical teachers often complain that medical students have forgotten or somehow "lost" knowledge that has been taught at pre-clinical levels at the time of entering the clinical part of education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, whether transfer of knowledge was identified as a problem by the teaching staff of anatomy and surgery, and if so, what strategies they used to overcome it. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten medical teachers in anatomy and surgery. Most teachers recognised that there was a problem of transfer and some individuals had adopted strategies to address this. However, there was no formal educational strategy suggested to overcome the problem of transfer. The conclusion is that transfer needs to be addressed both by basic science teachers and clinical teachers. There is a need for a mutual educational discourse of the contexts students will face.

  • 3.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Centre for Medical Education, Sweden.
    McGrath, Cormac
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Josephson, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Let’s talk about integration: a study of students’ understandings of integration2014In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1709-1720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the knowledge concerning clinical reasoning is advanced enough to translate into curriculum interventions such as an integrated curriculum, in which science theory and clinical practice can be interwoven effectively. However, the interpretations of what integration means differ and the purpose of this study was to elicit how students understand integration. This study was carried out using an interpretative perspective. Medical students, in their 2nd year of study, were asked to apply basic science knowledge from all previous courses to clinical cases in an examination. Subsequent to the examination, focus group interviews were conducted. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed by the use of qualitative content analysis. The analysis revealed how students comprehended integration: as the creation of wholeness, as relating new knowledge to core concepts, as reasoning, as application and as collaboration between teachers. The five categories were linked to three dimensions: intra-personal, inter-personal and organizational, each of which resonates with different theories of how expertise is developed. The outcome of this study adds to our understanding of how students conceptualize integration. The categories of 'integration' drawn out by the study are helpful in promoting further discussion of how eliciting students' own reports of cognition and may help the ongoing design of curricula by putting students at the center of the curriculum design process.

  • 4. Elmberger, Agnes
    et al.
    Björck, Erik
    Liljedahl, Matilda
    Nieminen, Juha
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Contradictions in clinical teachers' engagement in educational development: an activity theory analysis2019In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many medical universities offer educational development activities to support clinical teachers in their teaching role. Research has focused on the scope and effectiveness of such activities and on why individual teachers attend. However, systemic perspectives that go beyond a focus on individual participants are scarce in the existing literature. Employing activity theory, we explored how clinical teachers' engagement in educational development was affected by the systems they act within. Three focus groups were held with clinical teachers from different professions. A thematic analysis was used to map the contradictions between the systems that the participants were part of and the manifestations of these contradictions in the system of education. In our model, clinical teachers were part of three activity systems directed by the objects of patient care, research and education respectively. Contradictions arose between these systems as their objects were not aligned. This manifested through the enacted values of the academic hospital, difficulties establishing educational discussions in the clinical workplace, the transient nature of educational employments, and impediments to developing a teacher identity. These findings offer insights into the complexities of engaging in educational development as clinical teachers' priorities interact with the practices and values of the academic hospital, suggesting that attention needs to shift from individual teachers to developing the systems in which they work.

  • 5. Hörberg, Anna
    et al.
    Lindström, Veronica
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Conte, Helen
    Kalen, Susanne
    Challenging encounters as experienced by registered nurses new to the emergency medical service: explored by using the theory of communities of practice2019In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore challenging encounters experienced by registered nurses (RN) during their first year in the emergency medical service by using the social learning theory of communities of practice. During the first year in a new professional practice, a new RN experiences a transition during which the new professional identity is being formed. This is a challenging and demanding period of time. According to the learning theory of communities of practice by Lave and Wenger, individuals' learning and development in a new professional practice occurs through participation in social activity and is influenced by context. This study is based on the qualitative data from semi-structured interviews. Thirty-two RNs working in the Swedish emergency medical service were interviewed via telephone during the spring of 2017. A qualitative content analysis with deductive reasoning of the interviews was used. The analysis process generated the main category; New RNs participation is challenged by unpredictability and uncertainty in practice. The main category was based on three generic categories; Loneliness in an unpredictable context, Uncertainty about the team, and Uncertainty in action. The challenges new RNs encounter during the first year relate to all three dimensions of a community of practice; mutual engagement, joint enterprise and shared repertoire. The encountered challenges also relate to the EMS context. Taking into account all these aspects when designing support models for RN's professional development may be advantageous for creating positive development for RNs new to the EMS and/or similar practices.

  • 6. Komlenac, Nikola
    et al.
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Verdonk, Petra
    Hochleitner, Margarethe
    Siller, Heidi
    Parenthood does not explain the gender difference in clinical position in academic medicine among Swedish, Dutch and Austrian physicians2019In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 539-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have continuously shown that fewer women than men achieve leadership positions in academic medicine. In the current study we explored gender differences in clinical position among academic physicians at three university hospitals, each in a different European country. These countries, Sweden, the Netherlands and Austria, differ in terms of gender equality. We analyzed whether the number of children, working hours or publications could explain gender differences in physicians’ clinical position. In this cross-sectional questionnaire study 1333 (54% female) physicians participated. Physicians were asked about their gender, age, number of children, working hours and clinical position. We used structural equation models to explore the influence of gender on the physicians’ clinical position in each of the three countries. We explored whether the association between gender and clinical position could be explained by number of children, working hours or publication activity. The analyses revealed that at all three university hospitals gender influenced clinical position. These gender differences in clinical position could be partly explained by gender differences in publication activity. Female physicians as compared to male physicians were likely to publish fewer articles, and in turn these lower publication numbers were associated with lower clinical positions. The number of children or working hours did not explain gender differences in publication activity or clinical position. Therefore, factors other than unequal allocation of household labor, such as the academic working environment, may still disproportionately disadvantage women’s progress, even at universities in countries with high rates of gender equality such as Sweden.

  • 7. Liljedahl, Matilda
    et al.
    Engqvist Boman, Lena
    Porthén Fält, Charlotte
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    What students really learn: contrasting medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment2015In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 765-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a framework of 'before', 'during' and 'after' clinical placements. Three major themes emerged from the analysis, contrasting the medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment: (1) expectations of the placement; (2) relationship with the supervisor; and (3) focus of learning. The findings offer an increased understanding of how medical and nursing students learn in the clinical setting; they also show that the clinical learning environment contributes to the socialisation process of students not only into their future profession, but also into their role as learners. Differences between the two professions should be taken into consideration when designing interprofessional learning activities. Also, the findings can be used as a tool for clinical supervisors in the reflection on how student learning in the clinical learning environment can be improved.

  • 8. Wilhelmsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Hult, Håkan
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lonka, Kirsti
    Josephson, Anna
    The anatomy of learning anatomy2010In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, ISSN 1382-4996, E-ISSN 1573-1677, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 153-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of clinical teachers as well as research results about senior medical students' understanding of basic science concepts has much been debated. To gain a better understanding about how this knowledge-transformation is managed by medical students, this work aims at investigating their ways of setting about learning anatomy. Second-year medical students were interviewed with a focus on their approach to learning and their way of organizing their studies in anatomy. Phenomenographic analysis of the interviews was performed in 2007 to explore the complex field of learning anatomy. Subjects were found to hold conceptions of a dual notion of the field of anatomy and the interplay between details and wholes permeated their ways of studying with an obvious endeavor of understanding anatomy in terms of connectedness and meaning. The students' ways of approaching the learning task was characterized by three categories of description; the subjects experienced their anatomy studies as memorizing, contextualizing or experiencing. The study reveals aspects of learning anatomy indicating a deficit in meaningfulness. Variation in approach to learning and contextualization of anatomy are suggested as key-elements in how the students arrive at understanding. This should be acknowledged through careful variation of the integration of anatomy in future design of medical curricula.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf