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  • 1.
    Bygren, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Institute for Future Studies, Sweden.
    Biased grades? Changes in grading after a blinding of examinations reform2020In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 292-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group differences in average grades prior to and after a step-wise introduction of blinded examinations at Stockholm University are examined. Relative to students with 'native' names, students with 'foreign' names appear to experience weak positive bias in the grading of their examinations, but the estimated effect is sensitive to model specification. No substantial effects of blinding examinations with respect to male-female gaps are found. The results suggest that examiners - when the names of students are disclosed to them - if anything have a weak tendency to positively discriminate for students perceived to have an immigrant background, but they do not appear to discriminate on the basis of gender.

  • 2. Hagström, Linus
    et al.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Using meta-reflection to improve learning and throughput: redesigning assessment procedures in a political science course on power2014In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 242-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to the discussion on how examinations can be designed to enhance students' learning and increase throughput in terms of the number of students who sit, and pass, the course examination. The context of the study is a basic level political science course on power analysis, which initially suffered from low throughput. The contribution of the article is to demonstrate that no other changes to the course than the introduction of an element of meta-reflection in the take-home examination - a so-called reflection exercise' - helped increase throughput by 70-80%. The aggregated performance of the students was thus significantly enhanced after they were explicitly encouraged to meta-reflect on problems posed in the take-home examination, and on different strategies for tackling these problems. The introduction of another meta-reflection exercise in the mandatory seminars did not further increase throughput, but made a qualitative difference in terms of the positive feedback that students received on their work.

  • 3.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Assess as you go: the effect of continuous assessment on student learning during a short course in archaeology2008In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A continuous classroom assessment technique, 'Five-minute' essays, was applied during a short course called Scientific Methods in Archaeology-Applications and Problems, given at the Archaeological Research Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden. There was a strong positive and statistically significant correlation between the grades obtained by the students and time into the course. The results showed no significant difference based on gender but there might be a gender-based difference in approach. The 'Five-minute' essay was generally appreciated by the students even though some found it stressful. There was no significant difference in this appreciation based on gender. Several advantages of this assessment procedure in comparison with the more traditional final exam are presented.

  • 4.
    Trost, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Psst, have you ever cheated?: A study of academic dishonesty in Sweden2009In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 34, p. 367-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been reported that academic dishonesty is a prevalent problem that crosses all disciplines at the university level. But, how prevalent is it in Sweden? Little is published in the literature about lying, cheating, and plagiarism amongst Swedish university students. This paper focuses on the frequency of past specific academically dishonest behaviours amongst Swedish University students with consideration to social desirability. The results indicate that although there are variations in frequency of dishonest behaviours amongst university students, some dishonest behaviours are more common than others. Future perspectives are discussed.

  • 5. Weurlander, Maria
    et al.
    Soderberg, Magnus
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hult, Hakan
    Wernerson, Annika
    Exploring formative assessment as a tool for learning: students' experiences of different methods of formative assessment2012In: Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, ISSN 0260-2938, E-ISSN 1469-297X, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 747-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to provide a greater insight into how formative assessments are experienced and understood by students. Two different formative assessment methods, an individual, written assessment and an oral group assessment, were components of a pathology course within a medical curriculum. In a cohort of 70 students, written accounts were collected from 17 students and group interviews were carried out to explore the students' experiences of these two forms of assessment. All students were engaged in both assessment methods, which were conducted a few weeks apart, and data were collected soon after each assessment. Our findings suggest that formative assessments motivate students to study, make them aware of what they have learned and where they need to study more. Thus, formative assessment can act as a tool for learning, contributing to the process and outcomes of learning. A closer look at students' experiences of each form of assessment reveals interesting differences.

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