Change search
Refine search result
1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Hansson, Lena
    Inviting the petrochemical industry to the STEM classroom: messages about industry–society–environment in webinars2023In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports from a study of what messages concerning industry–society–environment are communicated to secondary students when they participate in webinars with representatives from the petrochemical industry. The webinars are conceptualised as part of an arena for governing science education and the messages as companion meanings. Empirically, the study is set in a context of online webinars on the topic of careers in the petrochemical industry. The webinars target students across the European Union (EU). The analysis reveals two main themes of companion meanings concerning what relations between industry–society–environment are communicated: a) the petrochemical industry as safeguarding modern life, and b) the petrochemical industry as essential for the solving of environmental problems. The companion meanings conveyed are not at all neutral but instead a means to influence the attitudes and choices of young people. The themes are discussed in relation to the overall democracy and citizenship aims of education. That the webinars claim to address the topic of careers and that they are part of an initiative sanctioned by a governmental authority (the EU) might contribute to teachers and students lowering their guard in relation to potentially biased messages. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Boyd, Emily
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Osbahr, Henny
    Responses to climate change: exploring organisational learning across internationally networked organisations for development2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 629-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from the organisational learning and governance literature, this paper assesses four internationally networked governmental and non-governmental organisations in the UK addressing climate change. We analyse how those concerned understand the climate change crisis, what mechanisms are put in place to address information flows, and what evidence there is of learning through sharing information between the organisational headquarters and their regional offices. The most striking finding is the evidence of learning that largely depends on ad-hoc informal processes and shadow networks.

  • 3.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hedefalk, Maria
    Ottander, Christina
    Pre-school teaching for creative processes in education for sustainable development - invisible animal traces, purple hands, and an elk container2022In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 457-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living in the anthropocene requires addressing several challenges. New forms of teaching where experiences of problem solving, creativity and innovation strategies are needed and considered important. This Swedish study contributes with knowledge on pre-school children’s creativity processes when working on an authentic, child-initiated sustainability problem about consumption. Teachers’ careful listening was important when forming the teaching context for the sustainability problem. A pragmatic perspective on learning and meaning-making is used to identify the significant features of the different phases in the creativity processes. The empirical results show: the importance of affording a creative context with uncoded material for children to transact with; previous experiences have a prominent role when imagining and reaching beyond the ordinary; the importance of teachers’ positive aesthetic judgments for sustaining the creative process. In alignment with the idea of learning as participation, the children broadened the consumption topic to contribute with creative outcomes for animals’ welfare.

  • 4.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Elementary students’ ‘outdoor – digital’ explorations in ecology - learning through chains of transduction2024In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 83-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates a research project in a Swedish elementary school where young students are engaged in a project on ecology. Species, digital resources and nature contribute to place-based exploration of ecological issues, relevant in learning for sustainability. Since children grow up in a digital era, their meaning-making is transversed by oral, digital and physical modes. By launching the terms relations, gaps, stand fast and chain of transduction as an analytical apparatus and connecting video ethnography to pragmatic theory and multimodal analysis, we contribute to the body of knowledge on students’ participation and meaning-making featured in digital and physical representations. Specifically, ecological and sustainability learning takes place in the transduction displaying students’ drawings, texts, digital images and biological arrangements. The article concludes with several education concerns: the teacher’s responsibility in supporting agency-processes, the growth of ecological literacy in a blurred ‘digital-ecology’ environment and the educational need to support students’ attachments and care for the living and nonliving.

  • 5.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Pre-school childrens agency in learning for sustainable development2013In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in pre-school children’s meaning-making and learning in education for sustainability. Young children should be recognized as ‘agents for change’ and active participants in their own day-to-day practices. Such issues are thoroughly discussed in the early childhood education for sustainability field. However, only a few research reports are presented on the subject. In this paper, our purpose is to examine empirically how agency is constituted when pre-school children explore science-related issues in a context of education for sustainability. The empirical material consists of video-recording sequences of four- to five-year-olds. In the analysis, we use a methodological approach based on Dewey’s pragmatist philosophy. We describe what a small group of children are doing and their ‘course of action’ towards ‘fulfilment’. In view of this, agency is explained as something that children achieve together in transactions rather than something they possess. Furthermore, the findings show the significance of the aesthetic relations in the constitution of agency. At the end of the article, we also discuss agency in relation to the ongoing debate on participation in young children’s meaning-making for sustainability.

  • 6.
    Garavito-Bermudez, Diana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Learning ecosystem complexity: a study on small-scale fishers' ecological knowledge generation2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 625-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale fisheries are learning contexts of importance for generating, transferring and updating ecological knowledge of natural environments through everyday work practices. The rich knowledge fishers have of local ecosystems is the result of the intimate relationship fishing communities have had with their natural environments across generations. Previous research on fishers' ecological knowledge has mainly been descriptive, i.e. has focused on aspects such as reproduction, nutrition and spatial-temporal distribution and population dynamics, from a traditional view of knowledge that only recognises scientific knowledge as the true knowledge. By doing this, fishers' ecological knowledge has been investigated separately from the learning contexts in which it is generated, ignoring the influence of social, cultural and historical aspects that characterise fishing communities, and the complex relationships between fishers and the natural environments they live and work in.

  • 7.
    Garavito-Bermúdez, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Exploring interconnections between local ecological knowledge, professional identity and sense of place among Swedish fishers2017In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 627-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecological knowledge of those who interact with ecosystems in everydaylife is situated in social and cultural contexts, as well as accumulated, transferred and adjusted through work practices. For them, ecosystems represent not only places for living but also places for working and defining themselves. This paper explores psychological aspects linking LEK/IEK/TEK to identity and sense of place in the context of fishery practices and management in Sweden. We analyse how knowledge of local ecosystems connect to fishers’ professional identity and their attachment to place by using the Person-Process-Place framework in integration with the Structure-Dynamic-Function framework on professional fishers in Sweden. On the basis of our results we conclude on the significance of physical as well as social and cultural features of fishing places for attachment and meaning as they are important for fishers’ local and professional identities, and also for ecological knowledge generation. Furthermore, fishers’ understanding of ecosystems complexity enhances their attachment and promotes positive emotions and behaviours for proximity maintenance.

  • 8.
    Garavito-Bermúdez, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Linking a conceptual framework on systems thinking with experiential knowledge2016In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses a systemic approach for the study of fishers’ ecological knowledge in order to describe fishers’ ways of knowing and dealing with com- plexity in ecosystems, and discusses how knowledge is generated through, e.g. apprenticeship, experiential knowledge, and testing of hypotheses. The descrip- tion and analysis of fishers’ ecological knowledge has been done using the Structure–Dynamics–Functions conceptual framework. Fishers identify 5–50 feeding interactions (Structure), recognize populations’ dynamics over time, and, the impact of external factors (climate change, water quality and overfishing) (Dynamics) and finally, acknowledge different values or services (Functions) of the ecosystem (drinking water and fishing). Knowing about these three main aspects seems to be core knowledge embedded in fishers’ ecological knowledge, which comprises systems thinking. Systems thinking is arguably part of fishers’ professional skills and significant for sustainable natural resource management yet understanding ecosystem complexity is also a cognitive challenge.

  • 9.
    Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jagers, Sverker C.
    Why do people accept environmental policies? The prospects of higher education and changes in norms, beliefs and policy preferences2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 791-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressing problems of environmental degradation are typically argued to require coordination, primarily through state intervention. Social scientists are struggling to understand how attitudes toward such state interventions are formed, and several drivers have been suggested, including education. People with university degrees are assumed to have certain values as well as the analytical skills to understand complex issues such as climate change. By using a unique panel data-set with students in different university programs (economics, law and political science), this study provides a better understanding of whether and how education affects environmental policy acceptance. One important finding is that university studies generate variation in support and scepticism toward different types of policy measures. For example, economics students tend to develop more positive attitudes toward market-based policy measures. This indicates a potential for education to increase the societal support often hindering the implementation of such policy tools.

  • 10. Hedefalk, Maria
    et al.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Ottander, Christina
    Almqvist, Jonas
    Didactical dilemmas when planning teaching for sustainable development in preschool2021In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 37-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyze preschool teacher students' conversations on planning teaching for sustainable development; a project. Previous research shows that teaching situations often involve strategies of achieving behavioral change; i.e. teaching the right way to handle garbage, and less activities allowing children to value and critically discuss sustainability issues. We take a pragmatic theoretical perspective to identify discourses on didactic choices created by teacher students during seminars. Texts in the form of transcripts of audio recordings from three seminars were analyzed, with the purpose of determining what didactical dilemmas were created in the students' discussions and in their reasoning about how to solve them. The results show a didactic dilemma common among the five groups of students. A tension between content as given, based on the curriculum, and content as created, based on children's experiences and ideas. Furthermore, the teacher students verbalized a third way of handling content, involving oscillating between given and created content. This oscillation allowed them to avoid normative teaching and instead achieve pluralistic teaching. Pluralistic teaching does not exclude predefined content such as facts, but it also includes other knowledge sources as well as allowing children to form their own opinions about sustainability issues.

  • 11.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students’ values and beliefs regarding policy responses to climate change2019In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 615-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores changes of environmental values and beliefs among secondary school business and economics students regarding government and market solutions to climate change. The quantitative study is longitudinal and a survey was administrated to students at two occasions including 212 participants in the first measurement. Results show a small significant increase in importance for altruistic, biospheric and egoistic value orientations at average. At an individual level, there are substantial movements over time. Nearly two-thirds of the students changed the strength of their value orientations over time. Taxes and legislation were regarded as the most effective solutions to climate change, however there was a decrease in seeing market prices as important mechanisms for change. Analysis suggested no direct relationship between change in environmental value orientation and change in norms. However indirect associations were mediated by changing beliefs in the efficacy of education and information and the efficacy of tax policies. For example, students who became more egoistic and more convinced about the efficacy of tax were less likely than others to be willing to take personal actions.

  • 12. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Environmental education, resilience, and learning: reflection and moving forward2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological resilience, a rapidly expanding area of scholarship internationally, seeks to understand how society and ecosystems mediate, adapt, and learn from change. This special issue is a pioneering attempt to explore the overlap of resilience, learning, and environmental education, in which four broad perspectives have emerged: (1) environmental education and learning may foster attributes of resilient social-ecological systems (e.g., biological diversity, participatory forms of governance, short feedback loops); (2) environmental education should not be viewed as an isolated means to address environmental issues, but rather as a complex and multifaceted part of a larger system of interacting structures and processes; (3) resilience thinking at multiple levels suggests a 'way out' of the instrumental/intrinsic split in environmental education; and (4) parallels among concepts used in learning theory and social-ecological systems resilience may contribute to discussions of transferability of ideas across disciplines. Whereas the authors are overwhelmingly positive about the potential contributions of environmental education and learning to resilience, in this endpiece to the special issue we offer cautions in suggesting the need to look for counter examples and to be concise in the use of terminology. Finally, we pose several research questions that might guide further work in this area, including: What are the outcomes of different approaches to environmental education relative to resilience attributes, such as social capital and ecosystem services? How do environmental education programs situated in management practice impact learning and values at the level of individuals and organizations? What role do different types of environmental education play in governance?

  • 13. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems: the Roles of Learning and Education2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Personal authenticity and political subjectivity in student deliberation in environmental and sustainability education2018In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 581-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study problematizes what is meant when one talks about classroom activities concerning environmental and sustainability issues as being authentic or not. It reports excerpts from three classroom discussions which start from questions formulated by the students themselves concerning issues related to sustainable development. It examines how the different questions give rise to altered kinds of participation and shows that the students' involvement shifted between either a distanced factual level of communication, or a personal level of communication. The result indicated that the nature of authenticity in a discourse differs depending on which question initiates it. If the initiating questions allow the students to distance themselves from the subject matter, then one type of authenticity is created. If, on the other hand, the questions give the students an opportunity to establish value-relations, or to dare to take a personal standpoint, as political subjects, to the issues at hand then the personal authenticity becomes another.

  • 15.
    Lundegård, Iann
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Arvanitis, Leena
    Hamza, Karim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Schenk, Linda
    Wojcik, Andrzej
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Haglund, Karin
    Facts and values in students’ reasoning about gene technology in the frame of risk–a thick comprehension2022In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1283-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current debate, there is no consensus on the relationship between knowledge and values in students’ reasoning and argumentation in socio-scientific and sustainability issues, i.e. if these should be addressed as separate entities or rather treated as a whole. In this study, we address this question empirically, with students engaging in two language games–aesthetic and epistemological–as they deliberate on ethical issues associated with genetic engineering. The study reports on a course unit that includes lectures, group work and student-led value-clarification exercises. The ways in which the language games interact were analysed using the established methods of Practical Epistemology Analysis (PEA) and analysis of Deliberative Educational Questions (DEQ). Our results show that aesthetic and epistemological language games were intricately intertwined in the students’ reasoning. Given this close entanglement, each language game was conducive to the development of the other and in so doing, deepened the understanding of the content as a whole.

  • 16.
    Lundegård, Iann
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    It takes two to tango: studying how students constitute political subjects in discourses on sustainable development2012In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great deal of the ongoing discussion about environmental education and edu- cation for sustainable development has to do with democracy and deliberation. Here, for example, the normative approach has been challenged. As an alterna- tive, there is sometimes a call for a curriculum and education that is character- ized by democracy, participation, and pluralism. According to this call, it is still far from clear what it actually means to create education in terms of democracy. While the debate is lively, it is not always anchored in empirical research. In this study, three students in a classroom situation talk about resources and soli- darity. Using analytical tools developed from a pragmatic base, the study tries to find a methodology to reveal how people create political subjects while engaged in such a discourse. This is associated with the discussion about democracy in education, and the consequences these findings may have in respect of how edu- cation on environment and sustainable development can be staged in terms of freedom and pluralism. 

  • 17.
    Lundegård, Iann
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication .
    Wickman, P.O.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication .
    Conflicts of interest: an indispensable element of education for sustainable development2007In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central concept introduced in the Nordic debate on sustainable development is 'action competence'. The concept has been defined as a competence of learners, i.e. the ability to take into consideration the social factors and human conflicts of interest that lies behind environmental questions and sustainable development. The concern of this article is the role of such conflicts for making meaning in relation to sustainable development. With this aim, we analyze a series of interviews with seven high school students. Our analysis takes its point of departure in the works of Dewey and Wittgenstein. It shows that the dialogue partners in this study continuously put one another in the position of having to make communicative choices in the dialogue. Moreover, the choices facing these dialogue partners can be translated into human conflicts of interest of a broader kind. A conclusion we draw from our work is that value judgments dealing with human conflicts of interest are a foundation upon which the dialogue on sustainable development is constructed, and that they seem to be a prerequisite if the dialogue is not to come to a standstill. We discuss the consequences of this finding for education for sustainable development.

  • 18.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Where to look and what to do? Blank and bright spots in research on environmental and climate change education2019In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1427-1437Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Resilience and learning: a conspectus for environmental education2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 475-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in how environmental education contributes to sustainability dating from the 1977 UNESCO conference in Tbilisi to the current Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, which in 2009, reached mid term. There is also a growing interest and concern in the complexity, uncertainty and changing nature of social-ecological systems and how sustainability is understood. Learning and resilience figure dominantly in both these trends. This contribution to the collection provides a conceptual overview of environmental learning, resilience in ecology and resilience in human development. The manners in which these conceptual areas are beginning to coalesce are discussed and their intersection in environmental education is illustrated in the context of formal schooling, organisations and society. Key research questions for environmental education emerge about its critical role in enhancing adaptive capacity and contributing to the resilience of social-ecological systems.

  • 20.
    Persson, Kristin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Andrée, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Caiman, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Making kin in the forest: explorations of ecological literacy trough contemplative practices in a Swedish folk high school2024In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about the use of contemplative practices in forest fieldwork and how such practices could support the growth of ecological literacy. Ecological literacy is explored by employing Donna Haraway’s notions of becoming-with and companion species. The study is based on fieldwork with a group of adult learners attending a folk high school in Sweden. The participants are followed as they encounter and are becoming-with species of the forest. The empirical material consists of video- and audio-recordings. The results provide a narrative of forest encounters, environmental concerns and dreams about the simple harmonic life. The forest fieldwork thus provides a site for elaborating a more inclusive ethics and teaching strategies where nonhuman-human relational aspects become center to ecological literacy. The results suggest that folk high school environmental education could be used as a source of inspiration in disrupting the practices of compulsory science education.

  • 21.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-ecological resilience and environmental education: synopsis, application, implications2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 493-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The resilience approach is rooted in ecology and is being advanced as a means to understand change in social-ecological systems. How can resilience be applied to understanding change in social systems, including in environmental education? In probing this question the main resilience approaches are described, the manner in which they may be applied to social systems are explored, and the implications of emerging issues are reflected upon. Applying resilience to environmental education requires concerted forethought and care. It also offers several opportunities for mutual enrichment to resilience and environmental education researchers.

  • 22.
    Powell, Neil
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute. University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia.
    Kløcker Larsen, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Integrated water resource management: a platform for higher education institutions to meet complex sustainability challenges2013In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 458-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions in Sweden are increasingly exposed to international market conditions and rising competition from a more mobile student body. This increases the need for universities to adapt to their social and economic environment and to their clients, including the political trends and financial opportunities in Sweden and EU, if they are to successfully implement sustainability reforms. In this regard, we examine the barriers faced by a ‘postnormal’  education for sustainable development (ESD) inherent within the structures of a ‘normal’ University. We pose the question whether Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) as a post-normal process can contribute to increased capacity of normal higher education institutions to address complex sustainability problems? IWRM is conceptualised as an interactionist process of social learning and adaptive management to reflect on the experiences from one particular case, namely the Master Programme in IWRM at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. We illustrate how IWRM can contribute to address conflicts of interests in education arising from competing claims of stakeholders in real life management situations, but also to reconcile the conflicts associated with institutional adaptation under conditions characterised by a new international educational regime and rapidly changing market conditions. The paper brings together the discourse on ESD with lessons from IWRM and contends that the interactionist approach might offer a useful alternative to realist conceptions of ESD in learner-centred and institutional systemic approaches. Contrary to other reports on IWRM education, this paper reflects on this role of IWRM within higher education per se.

  • 23.
    Schultz, Lisen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Learning for resilience?: Exploring learning opportunities in Biosphere Reserves2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 645-663Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

     

    The interdependence of society and nature, the inherent complexity of social-ecological systems, and the global deterioration of ecosystem services provide the rationale for a growing body of literature focusing on social-ecological resilience - the capacity to cope with, adapt to and shape change - for sustainable development. Processes of learning-by-doing and multiple-loop social learning across knowledge systems and different levels of decision-making are envisioned to strengthen this capacity, combined in the concept of adaptive governance. This study explores how learning for resilience is stimulated in practice; investigating learning opportunities provided in UNESCO-designated biosphere reserves (BRs). A global survey (N = 148) and qualitative interviews with key informants of selected BRs (N = 10) reveal that a subset (79) of the BRs serve as 'potential learning sites' and: (1) provide platforms for mutual and collective learning through face-to-face interactions; (2) coordinate and support the generation of new social-ecological knowledge through research, monitoring and experimentation; and (3) frame information and education to local stewards, resource-based businesses, policy-makers, disadvantaged groups, students and the public. We identify three BRs that seem to combine, in practice, the theoretically parallel research areas of environmental education and adaptive governance. We conclude that BRs have the potential to provide insights on the practical dimension of nurturing learning for social-ecological resilience. However, for their full potential as learning sites for sustainability to be realized, both capacity and incentives for evaluation and communication of lessons learned need to be strengthened.

  • 24.
    Sternäng, Li
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Climate change and costs: investigating students' reasoning on nature and economic development2012In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 417-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tensions between environmental protection and economic growth are critical to future well-being, and it is therefore important to understand how young people conceptualize these tensions. The aim of the present study is to explore students’ solutions to the dilemma of economic development and mitigating climate change, with regard to societal responses to the challenge of climate change. The study was conducted in China’s Green Schools. Green School is an international long-term programme with the aim of increasing students’ knowledge of environmental issues, and transferring this knowledge into positive actions to affect the wider community. The data were obtained through semi-structured pre- and post-interviews with 15–16-year-old students in three groups (12 students) from Green Schools in the Beijing area. The results show that students’ discussions focused exclusively on economic growth and social welfare. Students seem to believe that environmental problems are inevitable, nature is a ‘box’ of resources, and economic development is necessary in order to sustain and even improve nature. Therefore, there is no dilemma between economic development and environmental protection. The paper ends with a discussion on research and implications for teaching climate change.

  • 25.
    Sund, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Teaching contributions from secondary school subject areas to education for sustainable development - a comparative study of science, social science and language teachers2020In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 772-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries' policy documents and curricula, teachers in the subject areas of science, social science and language are encouraged to collaborate on cross-curricular issues such as sustainable development (SD). This study is conducted in secondary schools (compulsory years 7-9) in Sweden and investigates the similarities and differences in the responses of ten teacher groups (forty-three teachers in total) to questions about their teaching contributions in their own subject areas to education for sustainable development (ESD). The overall aim is to understand how teachers of these three subject areas can contribute to cross-curricular teaching in teacher teams in the context of ESD. This is done by analysing the group responses from data collected in group discussions concerning the teaching dimensions what (content), how (methods) and why (purposes) in relation to ESD. We first analyse the teacher group responses and arguments regarding their contribution to ESD teaching from each subject area separately. Thereafter, we comparatively analyse how the different subject areas' contributions overlap or complement each other in a potential collaborative ESD teaching. The results show that teachers from different subject areas stress different yet complimentary dimensions of teaching and perspectives of ESD. The implications for cross-curricular teaching in ESD are also discussed.

  • 26. Sund, Per
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Socialization content in schools and education for sustainable development – I. A study of teachers’ selective traditions2011In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 599-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies content issues by examining teachers’ communicated socialization content. The value-laden socialization content constitutes the educational context for the teaching of integrated subject matter and has not yet been thoroughly studied empirically in environmental education research. The implications of the results can be fruitful in discussions about how educational traditions evolve, as well as discussions about the relationships between environmental education (EE) and education for sustainable development (ESD). In this study, ten upper secondary teachers are interviewed and their expressed socialization content is examined. Various qualitative positions regarding five important educational aspects can be described in terms of three selective traditions. To strengthen the validity of the socialization content found in this study, the students of the same teachers were interviewed regarding their experiences of the socialization content of these teachers’ teaching. This is reported in a supplementary article (Sund and Wickman 2011; Sund 2008). Together these three studies (this article; Sund and Wickman 2011; Sund 2008) work to establish and test a method of discerning qualitative aspects in socialization content. Although the amount of data is limited, the ambition has been to triangulate socialization content qualitatively from three different sources: a literature study, teacher interviews, and student interviews.

  • 27. Sund, Per
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Socialization content in schools and education for sustainable development – II. A study of students’ apprehension of teachers’ companion meanings in ESD2011In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 625-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subject content is always studied within an educational context. This context is constituted by the socialization content, which can be regarded as an educational content beyond the subject content. This is the third article of three studies (this article; Sund and Wickman 2011; Sund 2008) that together form a triangulation of possible socialization content of environmental education. A common purpose for these three combined studies is to embrace and visualize the important value-laden content, which is often forgotten in discussions about the development of education for sustainable development. It is not sufficient to merely integrate more subject content matter – it may also be necessary to adapt to a changed teaching approach, which also develops content in the teaching process. Teachers’ changed approaches convey qualitatively different clusters of ‘meta-messages’ to students. The first study from authors in 2008 developed an analytical tool consisting of five important educational aspects and the second, also published in Environmental Education Research used the aspects to study teachers’ socialization content expressed in the interviews. The present study examines whether the qualitative differences in upper secondary teachers’ communicated socialization content in three selective traditions are apprehended by their students.

  • 28.
    Sund, Per
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Teachers’ objects of responsibility – Something to care about in education for sustainable development?2008In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 145-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Answers to questions about good teaching in environmental education can be expressed in different selective traditions. Questions as to what should be included in good teaching tend to be addressed by both teachers and researchers on an ideological basis. This qualitative study uses a pragmatist approach, and aims to make an empirical contribution to the debate. Rather than telling teachers what they should teach, this interview study involved listening to ten upper secondary school teachers in Sweden, and their arguments concerning their long-term teaching purposes. Why should students learn particular things? The teachers' answers revealed habits and frequently used the same arguments. These arguments recurrently dealt with what teachers particularly cared about, and five objects of responsibility were identified in the interviews. These objects of responsibility constitute the starting points of teachers' actions and can be seen as personal anchor points within a selective tradition. These points of departure remind the teachers of their teaching aims and objectives, and at the same time, keep them within a tradition. While they help the teachers in their everyday practice, they could just as easily be seen as tacit obstacles to efforts to change environmental education into Education for Sustainable Development. The results are also relevant for science education in general. Issues identified in the study include how the same scientific knowledge could be used for different purposes in education, and the different personal anchor points for long-term purposes of teaching based on teachers' own ideas of good teaching. These results can be important in developing a reflection tool for teachers, which in turn can help them to reflect more deeply about how they might change their teaching practices.

  • 29. Torbjörnsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Potential conflicts between ownership rights and environmental protection: Swedish undergraduate students? views2019In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 1790-1803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the perspectives of Swedish undergraduate students regarding potential conflicts between ownership rights and environmental protection. Conceptions of ?ownership? are relevant in relation to the environment and environmental protection as they can highlight a more transboundary relationship between the individual/society and nature. Students studying economics, law and political science were chosen because of their potential future transformative roles as decision makers and policy makers. Content analysis was employed to examine the written responses of 747 students from seven different universities to the open-ended survey question: Can ownership rights and environmental protection come into conflict? Students? responses were measured twice: at the very beginning of the first semester and then again at the end of the semester. The results show that students expressed a dominant view of ownership in terms of individual ownership, and associations to collective ownership were largely absent. In regards to the potential conflict between ownership rights and environmental protection, most students perceived such a conflict, and it was more common for the environment to be conceptualised as the losing party rather than the landowner. More research is needed regarding how teaching and instruction can deal with the potential conflicts between ownership (private/corporate/governmental) and environmental protection.

  • 30. Wildemeersch, Danny
    et al.
    Håkansson, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Læssøe, Jeppe
    No time to waste? Dealing with 'urgency' in environmental and sustainability education2023In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1417-1429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how and why the concept of rhythm is crucial to understand how environmental and sustainability education (ESE) may deal with the urgency of taking action regarding climate change. Many activists consider sustainability educators as important allies in this struggle. Our argument is that ESE has a different role and responsibility. Both activism and education can be important allies; however, they operate in different modes and rhythms. Three scholars John Dewey, Michel Alhadeff-Jones and Sharan Todd inspire us with captivating ideas on education as a rhythmic aesthetic experience. Their ideas also show the importance of the interruption of existing rhythms for opening new perspectives on how humans relate to the world. Our encounter with these ideas results into a plea for a pedagogy that provides for alternative, aesthetic arrangements of time and space. In line with this, we explore three examples of place-based education. We conclude that there is no time to waste regarding the problems of climate change. However, ESE requires a pedagogy that provides for alternative arrangements of time and space, while enabling educative moments interrupting a linear flow of time, including our familiar experiences of the world.

1 - 30 of 30
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf