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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The concept of language in the Swedish preschool curriculum: A theoretical and empirical examination of its productions2022In: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, ISSN 1468-7984, E-ISSN 1741-2919, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 5-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's language development is a core task in Swedish preschool and central to how educators organize teaching and everyday activities. The curriculum's definition of language is described as extended, with language as both a prerequisite for learning and a learning effect, i.e. both internal processes and communication. This means that working methods and didactic strategies rely on many different epistemologies and thus different theoretical perspectives. Nevertheless, the research literature, as well as assessments of Swedish preschool services, show that educators' interpretation of the curriculum is primarily socioculturally oriented. This does not entirely converge with how language is conceptualized in the Swedish preschool curriculum. Against this background, the aim of this paper is to perform a theoretical and empirical investigation of the extended language concept in the curriculum with the intention to understand what the consequences of this extended meaning of language produce in terms of teaching and learning practices. I have traced various epistemologies in language didactic preschool research and related this tracing analysis to empirical examples from preschool practices. The results of my analysis show that the practices are predominantly interpersonally framed, which corresponds to the emphasis in research. In a further analysis, where empirical examples are read from other possible epistemologies, the practices can be perceived as being multi-epistemological in a fashion which corresponds to the curriculum's conceptualization of language. This is discussed as an opportunity for a didactic strengthening of presently neglected perspectives.

  • 2.
    Björkvall, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Engblom, Charlotte
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Young children’s exploration of semiotic resources during unofficial computer activities in the classroom2010In: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, ISSN 1468-7984, E-ISSN 1741-2919, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 271-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes and discusses the learning potential of unofficial techno-literacy activities in the classroom with regards to Swedish 7–8-year-olds’ exploration of semiotic resources when interacting with computers. In classroom contexts where every child works with his or her own computer, such activities tend to take up a substantial amount of time. The children have access to a wide range of sites and programs and show an interest in discovering these resources. The article thus explores a previously often neglected site for learning, located in the official classroom context but involving self-chosen activities with contemporary technology. In terms of theory and methodology, social semiotic ethnography is introduced into the field of young children’s techno-literacies. It is illustrated how a social semiotic approach allows for a more detailed analysis of the semiotic resources, whereas ethnographic data are necessary for an understanding of how such resources are put to use.

     

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