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  • 1.
    Benson, Carol
    Stockholm University, Centre for Teaching and Learning.
    How multilingual African contexts are pushing educational research and practice in new directions2010In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 323-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strong case can be made for developing more flexible and relevant multilingual strategies for teaching and learning within the field of bilingual education. This paper aims to demonstrate how current linguistic and educational practices in countries like Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique and Ethiopia suggest new directions for research and practice. A practical approach is proposed to illuminate the gap between actual language competence on the part of primary students and teachers and the language competence to which their education system aspires. By applying known language and learning principles, policies and practices can be more realistically directed towards reducing this gap in the short, medium and long terms. This involves a reconstruction of multilingual pedagogy to capitalise on the strengths of learners, teachers and linguistic communities. Meanwhile, there is a need for more research on the following: (1) effective ways to assess multiple language competencies on the part of teachers and learners; (2) the relationship between learners' multilingual oral competence and literacy; and (3) methodologies that facilitate transfer of skills and knowledge between languages. The implications are that language-in-education policy should be based on what is possible in each sociolinguistic situation and should be flexible enough to offer equitable opportunities for all.

  • 2.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Struggles for legitimacy in mother tongue instruction in Sweden2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the pedagogical beliefs, practices and ideological assumptions of 15 teachers who work with mother tongue instruction in Sweden. Despite support through provisions in Swedish laws, mother tongue instruction is clearly a marginalized subject, not least due to its non-mandatory status, the limited time allocated for it and the fact that the subject and its teachers are often contested in public debate. In this study, the teachers’ narratives center round issues of legitimacy, both for the subject per se and for the teachers’ right to be viewed as ‘real’ teachers. In this paper, we highlight how the teachers link mother tongue instruction to the notion of a ‘common heritage’ and how they see themselves as advocates and role models for the mother tongue. The teachers raise the status of mother tongue instruction in a transformational way, to a subject that is essential and can have a positive impact for a group of students who would otherwise be at a disadvantage in the school system. The undermining of mother tongue instruction was found to affect the pedagogical practices, as the teachers often took into consideration how their teaching would be viewed by parents and colleagues.

  • 3.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Building a web in science instruction: using multiple resources in a Swedish multilingual middle school class2017In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 479-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, on the unit measuring time, examines classroom use of different resources and their affordances for students' meaning-making. The data, comprising audio and video recordings, fieldnotes, photographs and student texts, were collected during a lesson in a multilingual Swedish grad 5 classroom (students aged 11-12). In order to analyse the connections between the different resources, such as talking, modelling, using bodily action and practical equipment, reading and writing, and their affordances for meaning-making, we used pedagogical link-making, Dewey's principle of continuity and Halliday's Systemic Functional Linguistics. Findings show that in using these multiple resources, the teacher builds a web by linking various modes of representation, affording the multilingual students several opportunities for making meaning of the science content. Talk holds the prominent position and is linked to the other mediating resources, which in turn are linked to each other in all possible constellations. Science content is hereby mediated and reinforced through the web of multiple resources.

  • 4.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development for more equitable education in South Africa2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 177-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the guest editors’ introduction to the special issue ‘Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa’. The issue offers complementary perspectives on improving epistemic access for all learners but especially those whose home language does not match the language of learning. Plüddemann examines the complex configurations of ideological and structural factors in South African language policy processes and the diverse positions taken up by teachers in response. Makalela argues that a methodology that encourages translanguaging can overcome historical separations between groups and promote transformative pedagogies. Probyn points to the importance of principled ‘pedagogical translanguaging’ in the mediation of secondary school science knowledge. Kerfoot and Van Heerden illustrate the substantial benefits of Systemic Functional Linguistic genre-based pedagogies for second or additional language writing in the middle years. White, Mammone and Caldwell in Australia offer evidence that similar benefits were maintained over six years for learners who faced both socio-economic and linguistic disadvantage in schools. Finally, Cummins and Heugh offer expansive perspectives on the issue. The editors argue that dynamic plurilingual pedagogies can be allied with the explicit scaffolding of genre-based pedagogies to help redress asymmetries in epistemic access.

  • 5.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Van Heerden, Michelle
    University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Testing the Waters: Exploring the Teaching of Genres in a Cape Flats Primary School in South Africa2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 235-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty years after democracy, the legacy of apartheid and hitherto unmet challenges of resourcing and teacher development are reflected in a severely inequitable and underperforming education system. This paper focuses on second language writing in the middle years of schooling when 80% of learners face a double challenge: to move from ‘common sense’ discourses to the more abstract, specialised discourses of school subjects and, simultaneously, to a new language of learning, in this case English. It describes an intervention using a Systemic Functional Linguistic (SFL) genre-based pedagogy involving 72 learners and two teachers in a low socio-economic neighbourhood of Cape Town. Using an SFL analytical framework, we analyse learners’ development in the Information Report genre. All learners in the intervention group made substantial gains in control of staging, lexis, and key linguistic features. We argue that the scaffolding provided by SFL genre-based pedagogies together with their explicit focus on textual and linguistic features offer a means of significantly enhancing epistemic access to the specialised language of school subjects, particularly for additional language learners. Findings have implications for language-in-education policy, teacher education, curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment in multilingual classrooms.

  • 6. Tholander, Michael
    et al.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Doing subteaching in school groupwork: Positioning, resistance, and participation frameworks2003In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 208-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on subteaching, a phenomenon that regularly appears in pupil-run group work. On some occasions, junior high school pupils positioned themselves as subteachers, and exploited a series of teacher-like strategies. Thus, by instructing, evaluating, and disciplining their peers, they were found to take on repertoires and practices prototypical of classroom teaching. Thereby, discursive practices that characterise traditional classroom interaction were reproduced in small-group formats. On other occasions, subteaching was partly created by the pupils themselves in that they positioned themselves as pupils in relation to co-participant pupils, who were treated as `teachers'. Yet, the same pupils, at times, challenged such teacher positionings in a number of ways, e.g. by resisting the subteacher's task requirements. Regardless of whether pupils were positioned as subteachers or positioned themselves, subteaching was ultimately always a collaborative affair.

1 - 6 of 6
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