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  • 1.
    Ahl, Linda Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Kriminalvården, Sweden.
    Helenius, Ola
    Bill’s Rationales for Learning Mathematics in Prison2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 633-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a case study of a student’s rationales for learning mathematics. We operationalize Stieg Mellin-Olsen’s educational concept of rationales for learning and apply the concept on data consisting of three semi-structured interviews with a student in the Swedish prison education program. Our analysis shows that the student’s rationales vary in character over time as a reaction to his educational contexts. We conclude that Mellin-Olsen’s construct of rationales is useful for understanding students’ changing motivation in relation to the teaching and to the practice of mathematics the teaching entails. Teachers may use the concepts from our analysis as cognitive tools, related to students’ rationales for learning. By identifying students’ different rationales, opportunities arise for an individualized instructional design.

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  • 2. Andersson, C.
    et al.
    Antelius, J.
    Månsson, J.
    Sund, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Technical efficiency and productivity for higher education institutions in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 205-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates technical efficiency and productivity for Swedish higher education institutions (HEIs). One identified problem in previous research concerns adjusting efficiency scores for input quality. This problem is avoided using grades from upper-secondary schools. A second problem concerns heterogeneity with respect to subjects and institutions between HEIs. Using the Swedish national resource allocation system, students are weighted according to subject. For research production, a bibliometric index that allows for differences in publication tradition is used. A third problem when using the data envelopment analysis approach is the lack of statistical inference. Bootstrapping is used to approach this problem. The results indicate an average inefficiency of 12% and a productivity increase of around 1.7% per year.

  • 3.
    Berggren, Johannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Some Conceptual Metaphors for Rational Numbers as Fractions in Swedish Mathematics Textbooks for Elementary Education2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 914-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the presence of three conceptual metaphors for fractions – The measuring stick metaphor, Arithmetic is motion along a path, and Arithmetic is object construction – in four common and popular Swedish mathematics textbook series for years 1–3. I analyse the introduction of fractions and the kinds of tasks students are given in these books. The results show an abundance of labelling exercises related to Arithmetic is object construction, with representations of geometric shapes, in three of the book series. One book series reversely introduces fractions with The measuring stick metaphor and Arithmetic is motion along a path, with a focus on number line representations. The consequences of these variations in fraction introduction and treatment are discussed in relation to previous research and to process-object theories.

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  • 4.
    Boman, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Regional Differences in Educational Achievement among Swedish Grade 9 Students2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 610-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current article examined educational achievement at lower-secondary level in Sweden (Grade 9), using grades and national test results (NTR) as the dependent variables. Linear regressions and bivariate correlations indicated that the proportion of highly-educated individuals in each municipality was positively associated with grades and NTR and that the proportion of welfare recipients and non-natives, as well as rural location, had negative associations. In relation to two case studies with fewer observations, teacher certification rates were more strongly correlated with higher achievement measures. Overall, the NTR of Swedish as a second language (SVA) pupils lowered the overall results in most municipalities. For instance, in low-performing municipalities the native students’ NTR was virtually identical to that of the “high-performing” or “best” municipalities when SVA scores were removed. Thus, it seems misguided to highlight “successful” school municipalities whose performance is only average. 

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  • 5. Bødtker Sunde, Pernille
    et al.
    Petersson, Jöran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Malmö University, Sweden.
    Nosrati, Mona
    Rosenqvist, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Andrews, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Estimation in the Mathematics Curricula of Denmark, Norway and Sweden: Inadequate Conceptualisations of an Essential Competence2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 626-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging evidence that the ability to estimate has major consequences for both later mathematics learning and real-world functionality, this paper examines the national mathematics curriculum for compulsory school for each of Denmark, Norway and Sweden for the estimation-related opportunities it offers children. Framed against four conceptually and procedurally different forms of estimation (computational, measurement, quantity and number line), each of which is implicated differently in the later learning of mathematics, analyses indicated that none of the four forms of estimation were addressed explicitly in the Norwegian curriculum. Expectations of computational and measurement estimation were present in both the Danish and the Swedish curricula, although neither referred to either quantity or number line estimation. Even when estimation-related learning outcomes were articulated, there was no evidence of the processes by which they might be realised. Finally, there were no acknowledgements that estimation may contribute to the learning of other mathematical topics.

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  • 6.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What are we aiming for?—A Delphi study on the development of civic scientific literacy in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 224-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the EU FP 7 project PROFILES, this article presents our findings from a three-round Delphi study conducted in Sweden which aimed at establishing a consensus on how science education should be developed for citizens to enhance civic scientific literacy. A total of 100 stakeholders (9th graders, school teachers, scientists and science education researchers) were involved in our Delphi study in 2012–13. The results revealed that there were some highly ranked consensus ideas: environmental issues, inquiry skills, motivation/interest and holistic comprehension were all in line with conclusions drawn elsewhere in the literature and ideas within the PROFILES project itself. However, we also found that there were some mismatched aspects of our Delphi study and the Swedish curriculum. The conclusions of our research imply the importance of involving different stakeholders in the educational reconstruction process; we suggest that the school teacher in particular should play a vital role.

  • 7.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions.
    Lindwall, Oskar
    Säljö, Roger
    Questions, instructions, and modes of listening in the joint production of guided action: A study of student-teacher collaboration in handicraft education2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 497-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns a central issue in education as an institutional activity: instructions and their role in guiding student activities and understanding. In the study, we investigate the tensions between specifics and generalities in the joint production of guided action. This issue is explored in the context of handicraft educationor more specifically, a teacher education program in sloyd. Handicraft is particularly interesting when analysing instructions, since the purposes of instructions are often dual: (1) to bring about a broad, instructionally relevant mode of understanding artefacts (including their origin, aesthetics, etc.), and (2) to guide manual action in the production of such artefacts. In the article, a detailed analysis of an instructional sequence, which includes the production of two distinct types of embroideries, is reported. The analysis sheds light on the role of educational examples in sloyd as well as on the related issue concerning the distinctive difference between the activities of listening to instructions as part of a lecture, on the one hand, and, on the other, listening to instructions in order to be able to accomplish a task.

  • 8. Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Building life-world connections during school booktalk2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 511-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In criticisms of children's literature, notions of 'fantasy' and 'realism' are pivotal. In school 'booktalk' conversations pupils referred to what is 'real' in three different ways: (i) by referring to feelings of or semblance to 'real' life, (ii) by invoking shared facts and (iii) by making references to personal experiences. In cases when teachers or pupils initiated so-called text-to-life or real world connections, two types of dilemmas occurred. First, engagement was at times bought at the cost of quite literal reader responses. At other times, engagement was accomplished at the price of intrusiveness. There was, thus, a delicate balance between life world references, on the one hand, and literal readings or intrusion, on the other. Moreover, students sometimes resisted life world probing, but volunteered privileged information about their parents, displaying different notions from teachers about legitimate information in a school context.

  • 9. Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Olson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. Dalarna University, Sweden; Skövde University, Sweden.
    Rahm, Lina
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Individualisation in Swedish Adult Education and the Shaping of Neo-liberal Subjectivities2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 461-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we have analysed the ways a discourse on individualisation is taking shape within adult education in Sweden, how it operates, and what effects it has in terms of shaping student subjectivity. Drawing on a post-structural theorisation we analyse interviews with teachers and students in municipal adult education (MAE) and folk high schools (FHS). The analysis illustrates how both institutions contribute to the shaping of individualised subjectivities, although differently. At the end, a general question is raised about what happens with the democratic function of adult education in general, when a discourse on individualisation operates in the ways described, and more specifically, asks what is happening to FHS as an educational practice, that upholds its self-image as a last bastion of a collective notion of learning and subjectivity, and nurturing an educational practice of learning democracy?

  • 10.
    Fohlin, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Sedem, Mina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Karlberg, Martin
    School staff’s perceptions of implementing the Inclusive Behavioral Support in Schools framework in Swedish schools2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Determinants of Implementation Behavior Questionnaire for school settings (DIBQ-S) was administered to examine questionnaire internal structure evidence and ascertain 127 Swedish school staff’s perceived barriers to and facilitators of implementing the Inclusive Behavioral Support in Schools program. Using confirmatory factor analysis, we tested a 3-factor model (capability, opportunity, motivation) corresponding to the Theoretical Domain Framework and the COM-B system. Measurement of motivation was suboptimal, but a 2-factor model exclusively retaining capability and opportunity had fair fit. The questionnaire showed overall fair internal structure evidence. Facilitators related primarily to motivation, whereas potential barriers related to capability, opportunity, and motivation. Teachers working in early school years perceived higher opportunity and capability than teachers working in later school years. School staff in the implementation team perceived higher opportunity than other school staff. The DIBQ-S could support school implementations by ensuring that the process feels coherent, manageable, and meaningful for frontline implementers. 

  • 11.
    Hennerdal, Pontus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Andersson, Eva K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Competition and School Performance: Swedish School Leavers from 1991–20122020In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 70-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the wide-ranging liberal reforms introduced in the early 1990s, Sweden has become one of the most prominent realizations of Milton Friedman’s proposal for market-based schooling. From 1991 to 2012, the percentage of Swedish ninth-grade students attending independent, voucher-financed, private schools increased from 2.8% to 14.2%. A recent study using municipality-level data claimed that the resulting increase in school competition positively affected student performance in both private and public schools. In this study, using data on 2,154,729 school leavers, we show that this result does not hold when controlling for individual-level background factors and differences in the peer composition of schools.

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  • 12. Hultin, H.
    et al.
    Eichas, K.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Karlberg, M.
    Galanti, M. R.
    Pedagogical and Social School Climate: Psychometric Evaluation and Validation of the Student Edition of PESOC2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 534-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies indicate that school climate is important for student health and academic achievement. This study concerns the validity and reliability of the student edition a Swedish instrument for measuring pedagogical and social school climate (PESOC). Data were collected from 5,745 students at 97 Swedish secondary schools. Multilevel confirmatory factor analyses were conducted, and multilevel composite reliability estimates, as well as correlations with school-level achievement indicators, were calculated. The results supported an 8-factor structure at the student level and 1 general factor at the school level. Factor loadings and composite reliability estimates were acceptable at both levels. The school-level factor was moderately and positively correlated with school-level academic achievement. The student PESOC is a promising instrument for studying school climate.

  • 13. Hultin, H.
    et al.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eichas, K.
    Karlberg, M.
    Grosin, L.
    Galanti, M. R.
    Psychometric Properties of an Instrument to Measure Social and Pedagogical School Climate Among Teachers (PESOC)2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 287-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of a teacher-reported version of a Swedish school climate instrument called the Pedagogical and Social Climate (PESOC), which consists of 95 items covering cultural, structural and social factors. A sample of 348 teachers from 19 Swedish secondary schools was used. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis conducted within a structural equation modelling framework indicated that the PESOC had a two-factor structure at the teacher level and a one-factor at the school level. The PESOC’s convergent validity was supported by the school-level correlations between PESOC and another established instrument (i.e., the Team Climate Inventory). Further validation studies of PESOC are needed with larger, more representative samples, and with information on important outcomes such as student achievement and wellbeing.

  • 14.
    Ismayilova, Khayala
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teaching Creatively in Higher Education: The Roles of Personal Attributes and Environment2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 536-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore university teachers’ perceptions of creative teaching and other factors that may influence academics’ efforts to teach creatively in higher education in Sweden. A qualitative case study was employed, interviewing 14 university teachers in three focus group interviews. The results show that the university teachers’ perceptions of creative teaching differed slightly, yet were interconnected. They perceived creative teaching as an ability to engage students in learning, to solve problems in challenging teaching situations and introduce innovation or novelty into their teaching. The results also show that apart from personal attributes (e.g., imagination), environmental factors (e.g., departmental structure and culture) play an important role in enabling creative teaching practices.

  • 15.
    Jederlund, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Changes in Students’ School Trust as a Reflection of Teachers’ Collective Learning Processes: Findings from a Longitudinal Study2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 7, p. 1161-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This 2-year longitudinal study compares students’ trajectories for perceived teacher–student relationship quality and students’ selfefficacy (together discussed as students’ school trust) to previously documented teacher-perceived experiences in teacher teams’ collective learning processes. The article’s main contribution is the reflection in students’ perceptions, of their teachers’ perceived quality and attainment in collective learning processes. Comparisons between schools show that trajectories for students belonging to the only teacher team that experienced a more mature and successful learning process in an earlier study, differed significantly from the trajectories for students in compared teams. Differences demonstrated large positive effect sizes (d=0.81–1.14). Individual analysis provides deeper insights about how these students’ perceptions changed. Additionally, the full sample data confirms earlier findings of substantial cross-associations between student-perceived teacher–student relationship quality and student self-efficacy. For example, sustainable associations between supportive teacher–student relationships and students’ global academic self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulative learning were found (r = 0.43–0.51).

  • 16.
    Jägerskog, Ann-Sofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Using Visual Representations to Enhance Students’ Understanding of Causal Relationships in Price2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 986-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how different visual representations of price facilitate learning in upper secondary social science education. Three lessons on pricing were given to four classes (n = 94 students). Two classes had lessons based on graphs and two on a causal loop diagram. Written pre- and post-test answers were analysed phenomenographically and results arising from the two visual representations were compared. Results suggested that a causal loop diagram facilitated a more complex way of understanding the causal relationships in pricing than the graph. The traditional way of introducing price, through the use of supply/demand graphs, is thereby problematised. The study extends knowledge by identifying a synergy between phenomenography and research on visual representations and has specific implications for teaching and learning.

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  • 17. Karlberg, Martin
    et al.
    Klang, Nina
    Andersson, Filip
    Hancock, Kirsten
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Kearney, Christopher
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    The Importance of School Pedagogical and Social Climate to Students’ Unauthorized Absenteeism – a Multilevel Study of 101 Swedish Schools2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 88-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While individual and family factors behind students’ school absenteeism are well-researched, fewer studies have addressed school climate factors. This study investigated the association between school climate in Swedish schools and students’ absenteeism. A multi-informant survey of school climate was conducted in 101 schools and analysed in relation to the history of absenteeism of 2770 students attending those schools in the 7th grade at inception, with follow-up until completion of the compulsory school (9th grade). Data on absenteeism was extracted from schools’ registers. Student (but not teacher) positive ratings of school climate were associated with lower absenteeism between the age of 13 and the age of 16. The associations between student rated school climate and absenteeism appeared stronger among students with highly educated parents.

  • 18.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Assessment in the digital divide: Teachers´ and pupils’ multimodal interaction2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns assessment in the digital divide (Prensky, 2001) in Sweden’s most technologically advanced schools. It aims at studying interaction to understand assessment and to find how assessment can be didactically designed to recognise pupils´ learning. The study has a multimodal, design theoretical perspective on learning (Kress & Van Leeuwen, 2001, Selander, 2008b), which means that communicative modes are collected, transcribed and analysed. The results show that the subject design aims at an expert level, while formative assessment aims at a novice level (Lindström, 2002). Pupils are thus left without adequate guidance. Despite this, summative assessment aims at an expert level. As a conclusion, assessment should be designed exploratory (Quellmalz & Kozma, 2003) to encompass pupils’ new knowledge. Furthermore, assessment must embrace pupils´ signs of learning, in other modes than just text and speech, or much of what is learned will be ignored in the digital environment.

  • 19. Koyuncu, Selma
    et al.
    Kumpulainen, Kristiina
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Scaffolding children’s participation during teacher–child interaction in second language classrooms2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the nature of teacher–child interaction and teacher scaffolding in Finnish second language (L2) classrooms. Although previous research on classroom interaction has highlighted the importance of scaffolding in language learning, much less is known about the importance of scaffolding for younger children's L2 learning. Utilising a sociocultural approach, this study aims to fill this gap. The data were collected from seven pre-primary/early primary L2 classrooms, with four teachers and 205 children through video recording (56 h) and observational field notes. The interaction analysis focused on the communicative functions of teacher–child interaction, teacher and student initiations, and teachers’ scaffolding children's participation during whole-class and small-group sessions. The results show how teacher–child interaction during small-group sessions supported the children’s active participation in L2 interaction and learning. The results also suggest how changing from teacher-centred modes of classroom interaction to child-centred and playful interaction is challenging and requires strong teacher professionalism. 

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Social and Cultural Studies in Education .
    Learning Practices in Vocational Education2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 157-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article describes the learning practices created by 12 vocational teachers from five programmes by the tasks they give their students to work with. 'Classroom tasks' were observed and analysed according to their content, their forms, and the tools used. Further, the texts used for/written in connection with the tasks were classified. Three types of tasks were identified: school tasks, simulation tasks and vocational tasks. Many tasks in all three categories required the students to read quite a lot. The texts the students were to read were of two kinds: school texts and vocational texts (manuals, handbooks etc.). Most of the texts were vocational and were part of the tools the students were supposed to use in their daily work. This indicates that vocational education is often assumed to be 'practical'--as opposed to 'theoretical' programmes that prepare for further studies--also increasingly rely on texts. The texts you read and how you read them are, however, specific for each vocational area. The different learning practices, represented by the tasks in this study, can be described as bridging from one social practice, that of the school, to another--that of the vocation.

  • 21. Lindqvist, Henrik
    et al.
    Weurlander, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wernerson, Annika
    Thornberg, Robert
    Talk of teacher burnout among student teachers2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 1266-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student teachers recurrently and spontaneously talk about burnout when considering challenges of teaching. The following paper aims to address burnout from the perspectives of student teachers, as well as how they prepare to deal with the threat of burnout. There is a lack of research from a student teacher’s perspective concerning burnout. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews were analysed using constructivist grounded theory. The findings reveal that student teachers engaged in a learning process related to (a) making sense of the perceived causes of burnout, and (b) constructing proactive strategies. The perceived causes of burnout were understood as individual work ethics, systemic reasons, collegial negativity and personal deficits. These perceived causes were related to strategies to protect against burnout.

  • 22. Lindvall, Jannika
    et al.
    Helenius, Ola
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Impact and Design of a National-scale Professional Development Program for Mathematics Teachers2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 744-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By examining the effects of a national-scale teacher professional development (PD) program on instructional practices and student mathematics achievement, we contribute to calls for empirical studies investigating the impacts of such programs conducted at scale. The program corresponds well with core critical features of high-quality teacher PD and mathematics instruction identified in the literature, and the results indicate that it has had a small but statistical significant impact on teachers' instructional practices. However, no effect was found for student achievement. These results raise questions as to the importance of the critical features and how programs incorporating all of them affect instructional practices and student achievement.

  • 23.
    Lundqvist, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Siljehag, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Values and Needs of Children With and Without Special Educational Needs in Early School Years: A Study of Young Children’s Views on What Matters to Them2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 951-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how children experience life in educational settings should be an imperative for educational practitioners, evaluators, and researchers. Listening to children’s points of views would facilitate the development of educational settings that meet the needs of children and contribute to their wellbeing and development so that their experiences are both joyful and meaningful. A total of 56 children between the ages of 5 and 7 in 65 educational settings located in central Sweden were included in the study. Amongst the 56 participating children, 29 were identified as having special educational needs. The children’s views were collected from 2012 to 2015 using drawings and interviews, and these were analysed using a thematic analysis. Nine themes that reflected matters of importance for the children, both those with and without special educational needs, are described. These themes are discussed and linked to previous research, educational evaluation models, and theories of values and needs.

  • 24.
    Molander, Bengt-Olov
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Halldén, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Pedersen, Svend
    Understanding a Phenomenon in Two Domains as a Result of Contextualization.2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illustrates how contextualization influences students’ reasoning. An experiment on the properties of air was demonstrated with alternative design to two groups of primary students (n=45). Students’ written explanations to the observations show that an experiment in which science equipment and chemicals are used, signify a problem to these students, who have not yet been introduced to different disciplines of school science. We argue that the scientific arrangement of experiments might in fact obstruct students’ sound reasoning in explaining phenomena. In relation to the role as triggers for reasoning scientific equipment call for a more conscious utilization than is often the case in school science.

  • 25.
    Nilsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Bunar, Nihad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Educational Responses to Newly Arrived Students in Sweden: Understanding the Structure and Influence of Post-Migration Ecology2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 399-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education systems around the world have experienced a rise in the number of newly arrived students. This article explores the manner in which the Swedish education system responds to the diverse needs of these students. Using the concept of post-migration ecology, the authors outline and critically discuss the legal, organisational, and pedagogical responses that make up the educational landscape and structures of post-migration opportunity. The authors point to the emergence of a parallel educational structure and a deficit model in relation to newly arrived students and argue for a shift in perspective to one that recognises individual needs and resources. At stake in such a shift are not only the educational careers of newly arrived students, but also the realisation of the Swedish school system's stated goals of social solidarity and equity.

  • 26. Nilvius, Camilla
    et al.
    Fälth, Linda
    Selenius, Heidi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Svensson, Idor
    Examination of a multitiered RtI-model for identifying and supporting students at risk of reading difficulties in primary schools in Sweden2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some Swedish schools do not identify and support students with reading difficulties efficiently enough during the first years at school. A longitudinal design was used to examine a multitiered RtI-model for identifying and supporting students at risk of reading difficulties in a Swedish school context. The results demonstrated that the RtI-model could be successfully applied. The proportion of students in need of support (i.e., below the 25th percentile) was significantly reduced after two years. Compared to students in the reference group (n  = 759), significantly fewer students in the RtI group (n  = 113) scored below the 25th percentile in word and non-word decoding and reading comprehension in a short text at the end of Grade 2. The discussion highlights the RtI-model’s original ideas.

  • 27.
    Rajaleid, Kristiina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    School-Contextual Paths to Student Bullying Behaviour: Teachers Under Time Pressure are Less Likely to Intervene and the Students Know It!2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 629-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed whether the level of time-pressure reported by a school's teachers is predictive of student bullying perpetration. We combined data from two surveys conducted in 129 schools in 2016: the Stockholm School Survey performed among students in grades 9 and 11 (n = 10,668), and the Stockholm Teacher Survey carried out among senior level (grades 7-9) and upper secondary school (grades 10-12) teachers (n = 2259). Multilevel path analyses showed that teachers' stress and time-pressure increased with declining school leadership functioning. Teachers' level of time-pressure was, in turn, positively associated with student traditional and cyberbullying behaviour, through its effect on the school staff's tendency (not) to intervene against bullying, but not through the teachers' stress level. We conclude that schools with leadership that provides opportunities for the teachers to focus on their main mission can counteract bullying among the students and therefore indirectly also to promote student health.

  • 28.
    Ramberg, Joacim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Teacher Stress and Students’ School Well-being: the Case of Upper Secondary Schools in Stockholm2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 816-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress and stress-related complaints such as fatigue and depressed mood are common among teachers. Yet, knowledge about the links between the overall level of teacher stress within a school and individual student outcomes is scarce. This study investigates if the levels of teacher-reported stress, fatigue and depressed mood within a school are associated with students’ ratings of their school satisfaction and perceived teacher caring, respectively. Data derives from two separate data collections performed in upper secondary schools in 2016, the Stockholm School Survey (SSS) and the Stockholm Teacher Survey (STS), which were linked together (5367 students and 1045 teachers in 46 schools). Two-level linear regression analyses were performed. Results showed negative associations between school-level teacher stress, fatigue, and depressed mood and students’ school satisfaction and perceived teacher caring, even when controlling for student- and school-level sociodemographic characteristics. The findings suggest that teacher stress may have negative implications for students.

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  • 29.
    Riad, Rasmus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Siljehag, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Bölte, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Dialogic reading in preschool: a pragmatic randomized trial enrolling additional language learners2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additional language learners are at risk of presenting lower language skills in the majority language compared to peers. These differences in language skills have been observed at an early stage of education and may impact academic achievement later on. A randomized trial with a switching replications design was performed in Swedish preschools to examine the effectiveness of small group dialogic reading, aiming to promote oral language skills. The sample comprised 85 children with diverse language, socioeconomic, and cultural backgrounds attending nine preschools in three school districts. Dialogic reading was conducted by ten teachers, trained in dialogic reading and coached by three special education teachers. The dialogic reading intervention was feasible in preschool context and children progressed in their oral language skills during the intervention.

  • 30. Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Discourses about School-based Mathematics Teacher Education in Finland and Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 132-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this cross-case study we focus on school-based teacher education in Sweden and Finland. Through the use of focus-group interviews with mathematics teacher educators in Finland and Sweden, the study shows that there are substantial differences in how school-based teacher education is introduced and portrayed in the discourse about teacher education and prospective teachers' learning. The school-based teacher education among the Finnish groups is made relevant in relation to several aspects of prospective teachers' learning. In the Swedish groups, school-based teacher education is portrayed as an organizational problem and few aspects of prospective teachers' learning are brought into the discourse. The results cannot be generalized to the two countries but show interesting conceptualizations of school-based education potentially useful for teacher educators and scholars.

  • 31.
    Selenius, Heidi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    A scoping review on the psychometric properties of the teacher efficacy for inclusive practices (TEIP) scale2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers’ self-efficacy for inclusion is emphasized as necessary for enabling inclusive education. One instrument developed for measuring teacher self-efficacy for inclusion is the Teacher Efficacy for Inclusion Practice-scale (TEIP) (Sharma, U., Loreman, T., & Forlin, C. (2012). Measuring teacher efficacy to implement inclusive practices. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 12(1), 12–21). The present study aimed to identify and summarize the empirical literature on structural validation and reliability of the TEIP scale. A scoping review of 15 peer-review articles was conducted. The three subscales found in the original TEIP scale were confirmed. However, there is support for two subscales. The TEIP is also reported to be a construct without multidimensional constructs of teacher-self efficacy. Although the items worked differently in different samples, the internal consistency was generally sufficient or good. Our findings indicate that the TEIP is not yet a scale fit for comparisons between populations and contexts, reflecting the multifaceted nature of the concept of both inclusion and teacher self-efficacy.

  • 32.
    Skogmyr Marian, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Henricson, Sofie
    Nelson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Counselors’ Claims of Insufficient Knowledge in Academic Writing Consultations2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 1065-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contributing to academic literacies research, this study investigates how counselors at university writing centers in Sweden and Finland handle the micro-level management of knowledge in advice-giving. While writing counselors are experienced in academic writing, they are not necessarily familiar with students’ subject areas and may also lack access to other relevant information, such as specific writing instructions. Using Conversation Analysis, we examine how writing counselors address their lack of relevant knowledge through claims of insufficient knowledge (CIK). CIKs are typically used in assessment activities, to downgrade both positive and negative assessments, but sometimes also to upgrade positive assessments. Our findings demonstrate how the distribution of knowledge is negotiated in academic writing consultations and illustrate the epistemic complexity of this setting.

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  • 33. Stevanovic, Melisa
    et al.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Teacher Directives in Children’s Musical Instrument Instruction: Activity Context, Student Cooperation, and Institutional Priority2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 1022-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying precisely what teachers do to elicit desired changes in their students’ knowledge and skill is a long-lasting challenge of educational research. Here, we use conversation analysis to contribute to a deeper understanding of this matter by considering how Finnish-speaking instrument music teachers use directives to guide their students. Our data consist of 10 video-recorded instrument lessons (violin, piano, guitar, and ukulele). In our findings, we provide an account for the variance in the music instrument teachers’ use of six second-person directive forms in Finnish. We argue that the teachers’ choices between these directive forms are warranted by three dimensions of the participants’ conduct: (1) location of the directive within the participants’ wider activity structure, (2) degree of the student’s cooperation at the given moment, and (3) the institutional priority of action that is being called for.

  • 34.
    Szabo, Attila
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Stockholm City Education Department, Sweden.
    Andrews, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Uncovering the Relationship Between Mathematical Ability and Problem Solving Performance of Swedish Upper Secondary School Students2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 555-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine the interactions of mathematical abilities when 6 high achieving Swedish upper-secondary students attempt unfamiliar non-routine mathematical problems. Analyses indicated a repeating cycle in which students typically exploited abilities relating to the ways they orientated themselves with respect to a problem, recalled mathematical facts, executed mathematical procedures, and regulated their activity. Also, while the nature of this cyclic sequence varied little across problems and students, the proportions of time afforded the different components varied across both, indicating that problem solving approaches are informed by previous experiences of the mathematics underlying the problem. Finally, students’ whose initial problem formulations were numerical typically failed to complete the problem, while those whose initial formulations were algebraic always succeeded.

  • 35.
    Thomas, Sarah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eichas, Kyle
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Psychometric Properties of a Swedish Translation of the Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior Scales (PKBS): A Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling Analysis2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 1171-1186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study established the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior Scales (PKBS) and an index of empathy in a sample of Swedish four to six year olds (N = 115). Using Bayesian structural equation modeling, we found that a five-factor PKBS and one-factor empathy model provided good fit to the data, posterior predictive p-value (PPP) = .246. Results indicated good internal consistency (ω .73 to .92). Consistent with the CASEL model and prior research, positive associations were found between social emotional competencies. Relationship skills were positively associated with empathy and negatively associated with internalizing problems. Results provided support for the use of the PKBS as well as the empathy scale in Swedish preschools.

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  • 36.
    Trostek, Jonas R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Acceptance as a Normative Aspect of the Process of Coming to Understand Emotionally Charged Concepts: Upper-Secondary School Students Make Meaning of Gender2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 381-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on how students' acceptance of emotionally charged theories relates to their understanding is based on the measurement of acceptance and understanding as two separate variables. As an alternative, the present study takes a qualitative approach with the aim of exploring what 24 upper-secondary school students accept when they come to understand the concept of gender and how to justify gender-related statements. The results show how the students accept ideas about social structures, power, and emancipation, as well as ideas about essences, individual independence, and a natural order. As for their justifications, they accept ideals of equality and objectivity. By assuming that the ideas have positive connotations for the students, it becomes possible to understand them as engaged in negotiating norms that are brought to the fore in the interviews.

  • 37.
    von Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lederman, Judith
    Lederman, Norman
    Views About Scientific Inquiry: A Study of Students’ Understanding of Scientific Inquiry in Grade 7 and 12 in Sweden2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 336-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses data from the Swedish sample of the international VASI (Views about scientific inquiry) study (Lederman et al. [2019]. An international collaborative investigation of beginning seventh grade students’ understandings of scientific inquiry: Establishing a baseline. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Published online. https://doi.org/10.1002/tea.21512). Understandings about scientific inquiry involve knowledge about the processes of inquiry, and are not the same as being able to do inquiry although these are related domains. This paper focuses on what students know about scientific inquiry and what impact school science may have on this knowledge. Data were collected using the VASI instrument developed previously and was administered to 126 students at the beginning of year seven and 145 students at the end of year 12 in a cross-sectional design. Results indicate that the majority of students do not have an informed understanding of key aspects of scientific inquiry in either grade. Although students in year 12 are more informed, the average is still less than 50% as measured by the VASI and with a large spread. 

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  • 38. von Reybekiel Trostek, Jonas
    Acceptance as a normative aspect of the process of coming to understand emotionally charged concepts: Upper secondary school students make meaning of genderIn: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on how students’ acceptance of emotionally charged theories relates to their understanding is based on the measurement of acceptance and understanding as two separate variables. As an alternative, the present study takes a qualitative approach with the aim of exploring what 24 upper secondary school students accept when they come to understand the concept of gender and how to justify gender-related statements. The results show how the students accept ideas about social structures, power, and emancipation, as well as ideas about essences, individual independence, and a natural order. As for their justifications, they accept ideals of equality and objectivity. By assuming that the ideas have positive connotations for the students, it becomes possible to understand them as engaged in negotiating norms that are brought to the fore in the interviews.

  • 39.
    Wermke, Wieland
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. University of South Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Beck, Inken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Department of Special Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Power and inclusion. German and Swedish special educators’ roles and work in inclusive schools2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a comparative interview study (N = 45) with Swedish and German special educators working in inclusive school settings in order to gain an understanding of how inclusive education is operationalized by the provision of special education needs (SEN) support; and how both aspects are conditioned by nation-specific particularities. Drawing on our interview analyses, we suggest an analytical device for examining and comparing the provision of SEN support in school organizations from a comparative perspective. The device is a 9-dimensional matrix, understanding the phenomenon in terms of three levels (individual, group, organizational) related to three domains (educational, social, administrative). Employing this matrix, we explain national differences in operationalizing inclusive schools. Compared with Germany, in Sweden, special educators have much more power in the inclusive school, and significantly more important decisions regarding SEN are made at an organizational level, and not only regarding individual students in need of special support.

  • 40.
    Österling, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    inVisible Theory in Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers’ Practicum Tasks2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study adds to an ongoing debate about third spaces in teacher education, spaces where theory and practice come together. One third space is constituted by the written tasks from practicum. Yet research has shown only modest emphasis on theory in such tasks. Tasks from two versions of a programme are used to represent two different positions on linking theory and practice. The tasks were therefore analysed with respect to the demarcation of conceptual objects as well as practice-based contexts. The findings indicate a difference with respect to the demarcation of conceptual objects, especially concepts relating to mathematics and mathematics education. This is seen as indicative of the reduced encouragement of linking theory and practice. 

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