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  • 1. Cassibba, Rosalinda
    et al.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Costantini, Alessandro
    Mothers' attachment security predicts their children's sense of God's closeness2013In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current research reports that mothers' security of attachment predicts their children's sense of God's closeness. A total of 71 mother–child dyads participated (children's M age = 7.5). Mothers' attachment organization was studied with the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; Main, Goldwyn, & Hesse, 2003) and their religiosity and attachment to God were measured with questionnaires. Children were told stories about visually represented children in attachment-activating and attachment-neutral situations, and placed a God symbol on a felt board to represent God's closeness to the fictional children. Children of secure mothers placed the God symbol closer (d = .78) than children of insecure mothers across both types of situations, suggesting that children's experiences with secure-insecure mothers generalize to their sense of God's closeness. Also, girls (but not boys) placed the God symbol closer in attachment-activating than in attachment-neutral situations, giving partial support for an attachment normative God-as-safe-haven model. Finally, mothers' religiosity and attachment to God were unrelated to child outcomes.

  • 2. Fransson, Mari
    et al.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bohlin, Gunilla
    Hagekull, Berit
    Interlinkages between attachment and the Five-Factor Model of personality in middle childhood and young adulthood: a longitudinal approach2013In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 219-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine concurrent and prospective links between attachment and the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality from middle childhood to young adulthood (n=66). At age 8.5 years, attachment was measured with the Separation Anxiety Test and at 21 years with the Adult Attachment Interview, whereas the personality dimensions were assessed with questionnaires at both time points. The results showed that attachment and personality dimensions are meaningfully related, concurrently and longitudinally. Attachment security in middle childhood was positively related to extraversion and openness, both concurrently and prospectively. Unresolved/disorganized (U/d) attachment was negatively related to conscientiousness and positively related to openness in young adulthood. U/d attachment showed a unique contribution to openness above the observed temporal stability of openness. As attachment security was also associated with openness, the duality of this factor is discussed together with other theoretical considerations regarding attachment theory in relation to the FFM.

  • 3.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Observations of disorganized behaviour yield no magic wand: Response to Shemmings2016In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 529-533Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forslund, Tommie
    Fransson, Mari
    Springer, Lydia
    Lindberg, Lene
    Mothers with intellectual disability, their experiences of maltreatment and their children’s attachment representations: a small-group matched comparison study2014In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 417-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maternal intellectual disability (ID) is regarded a risk factor in child development, but there is no scientific evidence on maternal ID in relation to children’s attachment. Using a matched comparison design, a small group (= 23) of mothers diagnosed with ID was studied to help fill this gap. Besides maternal ID, we examined the role of abuse/trauma/maltreatment (ATM) in the mothers’ biographies, along with potential confounds. Comparison group mothers (= 25) had normal variations in intelligence and matched mothers with ID on residential area, income, child age, and sex. History of maternal ATM was assessed using a semi-structured interview and was found to be significantly more likely in the ID group mothers’ experience than the comparison group mothers. Children’s (M age = 77 months) attachment representations were assessed with the Separation Anxiety Test. Among children of mothers with ID, a substantial minority (35%) had a secure and the vast majority (>80%) an organized attachment representation. Mothers with ID who had suffered elevated ATM were significantly more likely to have children who were scored high on disorganization and insecurity. We discuss possible implications of our findings for societal considerations regarding parenting and child attachment in the context of parental ID status.

  • 5.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    et al.
    Department of Psychology , Uppsala University , Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fransson, Mari
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Hegekull, Berit
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Disorganized attachment, absorption, and new age spirituality: a mediational model2009In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 385-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a theoretical model and an empirical review linking disorganized attachment with New Age spiritual beliefs and activities via a proposed mediator; the propensity to enter altered states of consciousness (absorption/dissociation). Utilizing a prospective longitudinal design (N = 62), an empirical test of the mediational model is also provided for illustrational purposes. More specifically, we tested if unresolved/disorganized (U/d) attachment scores, as identified via the Adult Attachment Interview at the first assessment point, predicted New Age spirituality 3 years later, and whether this link was mediated by absorption. Results supported the mediational model, although the bivariate relation between U/d attachment and New Age spirituality was of modest strength. The discussion focuses on the general implications, clinical as well as non-clinical, of the proposed model. Finally, we argue that time is now ripe for attachment researchers to address additional non-pathological sequelae of disorganized attachment and the related propensity to experience altered states of consciousness.

  • 6.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Hesse, Erik
    Fransson, Mari
    Main, Mary
    Hagekull, Berit
    Bohlin, Gunilla
    Prior participation in the strange situation and overstress jointly facilitate disorganized behaviours: implications for theory, research and practice2016In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 235-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We seek to understand why a relatively high percentage (39%; vs the meta-analytic average, 15-18%) of disorganized/disoriented (D) classifications has accrued in the low-risk Uppsala Longitudinal Study (ULS) study, using experienced D coders. Prior research indicates that D behaviours do not always indicate attachment disorganization stemming from a history of frightening caregiving. We examined the role of two other presumed factors: participation in a previous strange situation and overstress. Our findings indicate that both factors were highly prevalent in the ULS sample and that they jointly predicted higher rates of D. First, participation in a previous strange situation was associated with significantly higher distress displays during the second visit than occurred among previously untested children, suggesting that prior participation in the strange situation had a sensitizing effect on child distress during the second visit. Second, unless separations were cut short in lieu of high distress during the second visit, re-tested children were disproportionately likely (ca 60%) to be classified D. We argue that these findings have important implications for theory, research, and practice. In particular, we conclude that practitioners must refrain from misattributing the appearance of any D behaviors observed to a history of maltreatment.

  • 7.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Sroufe, L. Alan
    Dozier, Mary
    Hesse, Erik
    Steele, Miriam
    van Ijzendoorn, Marinus
    Solomon, Judith
    Schuengel, Carlo
    Fearon, Pasco
    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian
    Steele, Howard
    Cassidy, Jude
    Carlson, Elizabeth
    Madigan, Sheri
    Jacobvitz, Deborah
    Foster, Sarah
    Behrens, Kazuko
    Rifkin-Graboi, Anne
    Gribneau, Naomi
    Spangler, Gottfried
    Ward, Mary J.
    True, Mary
    Spieker, Susan
    Reijman, Sophie
    Reisz, Samantha
    Tharner, Anne
    Nkara, Frances
    Goldwyn, Ruth
    Sroufe, June
    Pederson, David
    Pederson, Deanne
    Weigand, Robert
    Siegel, Daniel
    Dazzi, Nino
    Bernard, Kristin
    Fonagy, Peter
    Waters, Everett
    Toth, Sheree
    Cicchetti, Dante
    Zeanah, Charles H.
    Lyons-Ruth, Karlen
    Main, Mary
    Duschinsky, Robbie
    Disorganized attachment in infancy: a review of the phenomenon and its implications for clinicians and policy-makers2017In: Attachment & Human Development, ISSN 1461-6734, E-ISSN 1469-2988, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 534-558Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disorganized/Disoriented (D) attachment has seen widespread interest from policy makers, practitioners, and clinicians in recent years. However, some of this interest seems to have been based on some false assumptions that (1) attachment measures can be used as definitive assessments of the individual in forensic/child protection settings and that disorganized attachment (2) reliably indicates child maltreatment, (3) is a strong predictor of pathology, and (4) represents a fixed or static trait of the child, impervious to development or help. This paper summarizes the evidence showing that these four assumptions are false and misleading. The paper reviews what is known about disorganized infant attachment and clarifies the implications of the classification for clinical and welfare practice with children. In particular, the difference between disorganized attachment and attachment disorder is examined, and a strong case is made for the value of attachment theory for supportive work with families and for the development and evaluation of evidence-based caregiving interventions.

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